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News about the Digital Humanities Innovation Lab

Using NVivo for Humanities Research

Published November 26, 2018 by Kandice Sharren

The Digital Humanities Skills Workshop Series continued on Tuesday, October 30 with the workshop, “Using NVivo for Humanities Research.” Facilitated by Graduate Peer NVivo Facilitator, Esteban Morales, and DHIL Fellow Kandice Sharren, this workshop explored the possibilities NVivo represents for humanities research and introduced participants to the basics of using it. 

Meet our new User Interface Developer -- Catherine Winters

Published October 2, 2018 by Kim O'Donnell

This fall, the Lab is very happy to welcome a new User Interface Developer to the team! Catherine Winters joined us this September, and I talked with her about her path to the DHIL, designing cooperative interfaces, creating Twitter bots, and growing up with the World Wide Web.

Kim: Hi Catherine! So my first question is, what does a User Interface Developer do?

Catherine: Hi! Well, I make our Digital Humanities projects easier to use by improving their user experience.

When did you first learn to code, and how?

DHIL's New Fall 2018 Technical Fellow!

Published September 20, 2018 by Hannah Holtzclaw

Hello! Hannah Holtzclaw here, the Digital Humanities and Innovation Lab’s newest technical fellow. As a new team member to DHIL, I wanted to take a minute to introduce myself and the role of DH in my personal pedagogy and philosophy.

Introduction to Spatial Data in the Humanities

Published July 31, 2018 by Kim O'Donnell

“If I had to draw a map of those four-plus years to illustrate the time between the day of my mother’s death and the day I began my hike on the Pacific Crest Trail...the map would be a confusion of lines in all directions, like a crackling Fourth of July sparkler with Minnesota at its inevitable center,” Cheryl Strayed writes in her autobiography, Wild. “But,” she continues, “those lines wouldn’t tell the story” (28).

Open Access and Open Scholarship at DHSI

Published July 30, 2018 by Kim O'Donnell
The Benefits of Open Access (adapted from Danny Kingsley and Sarah Brown)

For a week in June, I joined seven other members of the Digital Humanities community from around the world for a week-long session called “Open Access and Open Scholarship” to learn more about how to responsibly make scholarly communication open and accessible to the public. I was at DHSI, the Digital Humanities Summer Institute at the University of Victoria, which has become one of the most well-attended DH training programs in North America.

Beyond the Cloud: Analyzing Texts with Voyant

Published June 19, 2018 by Kim O'Donnell
Word cloud of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein created with Voyant

If you are interested in finding out what the most frequently occuring words are in the text(s) you are researching, you could always start by creating a Word Cloud, one of the best known text analysis visualizations. The results are simple and aesthetically-pleasing: run your text through a word cloud application to produce a roughly circular design of the most frequently used words, with the highest frequency appearing as the largest and lower frequencies diminishing in size.

Hacking the Scholarly Workflow

Published May 14, 2018 by Kim O'Donnell
Participants at Hacking the Scholarly Workflow

From keeping track of our schedules, our citations, our writing revisions, and our millions of photos, digital tools have the power to make research and teaching easier - or, at least, more organized. The only problem is, they only work if you know about them! On April 13, 2018, the DHIL’s day-long event “Hacking the Scholarly Workflow” was a chance to introduce participants to some of those useful tools and their best practices.

Dreams, Narratives… Analysis

Published March 28, 2018 by Kim O'Donnell
Dream Language Word Cloud

Most people regard their nocturnal adventures a little higher than sheer gibberish, and they tend to quickly forget about them a few minutes after waking up. At Dr. Tore Nielsen’s Dream and Nightmare Laboratory in Montréal though, these are highly valued as items of a scientific inquiry into consciousness and cognition. Talk of text analysis, at first, might seem a bit out of place here; dreams are hallucinatory experiences that take place during sleep - they don’t seem to be the kind of things that give way to objective study.

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