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Research Commons: Workshops for graduate students & postdoctoral fellows

The Research Commons is pleased to offer you a range of workshops. Register for upcoming workshops. Search by date in our workshops calendar.

If you do not see the topic(s) you are interested in and/or would like a specialized workshop for yourself and a group of colleagues, send a request to research-commons@sfu.ca.

SFU values diversity and is committed to inclusion. If you require any disability related accommodations in order to fully access and participate in our workshops and/or events, please contact us directly at library-workshops@sfu.ca. Please contact us as soon as possible as some accommodations will require lead time to arrange (i.e. CART, ASL)

All in a Day

All in a Day: Research Roadmap - is a suite of our most popular workshops for graduate students and postdoctoral fellows. Mid-morning refreshments will be served at 11:00am

Research Ethics: Ethics Principles and Institutional Requirements

The purpose of this session is to engage students in considering and discussing the ethical conduct of research involving humans. A number of topics will be covered, including a brief overview of the ethics review process.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Saturday, January 19, 2019 - 9:30am to 11:00am Surrey, Galleria 3, Rm 3290

Communicate with Purpose and Intent

Do you feel lost or challenged when communicating your research to audiences who are non subject matter experts?  When you're asked about what your research is about, do you often feel it may be too complicated to explain, or you feel as though you must provide all the details for your audience to understand? In most situations, constraints with time limits what and how we can communicate with our research.  This workshop session will address some of those questions and provide strategies for communicating your research with purpose and intent.  If you are preparing for an upcoming presentation or just curious about how you can further develop your communication skills, we invite you to join us for this interactive workshop. 

Dr. Poh Tan is an entrepreneur, a stem cell biologist, an educator, a volunteer and a mother.  She has made substantive contributions to many different fields and has made positive impacts on many people’s lives throughout her career. Poh’s current focus is on inspiring young children and their educators to use scientific thinking as a tool to open up their world and courageously walk into a bright future full of limitless possibilities.  Poh obtained her first PhD from the Faculty of Medicine at UBC focusing on the biology of blood stem cells. Her experience led her to a successful career in the biotechnology sector and eventually, helped her become a successful entrepreneur with two businesses.  Poh's passion lies in developing scientific literacy in young children and is currently pursuing a second PhD at SFU.  Through her academic and industry experience, Poh has communicated her research to national and international audiences, including sharing her knowledge as a two time TEDx speaker.  She coaches graduate students to develop their oral and written skills to effectively communicate their research to different types of audiences.     

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Saturday, January 19, 2019 - 9:30am to 11:00am Surrey, Galleria 3, Rm 3280

Making Literature Reviews Easier with NVivo for Mac

This interactive workshop introduces importing and coding of literature review materials and key tools that can be particularly helpful when reviewing literature in your area of research.

Topics covered include:

  • introducing NVivo and setting up a project
  • working with your information
  • identifying themes, topics and ideas and collecting data to support them
  • using tools such as text search query, matrix coding query, and Framework Matrix.

What will you achieve from this session? You will have the knowledge to set up a literature review in NVivo, and begin to work with your information. You will also be able to use NVivo to organize your content and begin to identify themes, topics or ideas. It is appropriate for those who have had some experience with NVivo. For more information about NVivo at SFU, please visit NVivo Software for Research Analysis.

Participants should also have some familiarity with citation management software (Zotero, Mendeley, Refworks, EndNote, etc). Zotero will be used during this workshop.

Note: You will need to bring your own Mac laptop, loaded with the latest version of NVivo for Mac.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Saturday, January 19, 2019 - 9:30am to 11:00am Surrey

What is the Open Science Framework (OSF)?

The OSF is a free, open-source web app that manages research projects at all stages of the research lifecycle. It is used for documentation, file storage, versioning, collaboration, and it connects the various tools researchers currently use. The OSF is produced by the Center for Open Science (COS) and has over 60,000 users across various academic disciplines. Attend the workshop to learn more and explore the OSF.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Saturday, January 19, 2019 - 11:30am to 1:00pm Surrey, Galleria 3, Rm 3290

Writing and Researching Your Literature Review

This interactive workshop focuses on the literature review and literature search. At this session you will learn:

  • conventions of literature reviews,
  • search strategies,
  • advanced features of research databases,
  • and tips to further develop effective and efficient research skills.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Saturday, January 19, 2019 - 11:30am to 1:15pm Surrey, Galleria 3, Rm 3280

Preparing to Publish

Graduate students are always encouraged to publish but often without really knowing what that means or how to start. This workshop will focus on navigating the peer review process and will also touch on the topics of open access, working with an editor, and co-authorship.  It will include a discussion of copyright transfer agreements and licenses and provide insight into publishing venues for assuring your research has the best possible visibility, accessibility, and impact.

A few questions this session will help to answer:

  • How does the publishing cycle work?
  • How can you assess potential publishing venues?
  • What is peer review and how can you respond to reviewer comments?
  • What rights can you retain to your published research?
  • What are predatory publishers and how can you avoid them?

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Saturday, January 19, 2019 - 2:00pm to 3:30pm Surrey, Galleria 3, Rm 3290

Digital Humanities

Introduction to Spatial Data in Humanities: The Spatial Elements of Textual Analysis

Many humanities researchers have some form of geographical information included in their research, such as objects, images, or texts from or about a particular place; narratives about a person’s movement or a place’s change over time; or information about networks of people or organizations. Whether places and spaces are at the heart of your research or are a part of it, mapping can help answer research questions and generate new ones by visualizing your data in new ways. It can help tell a story about place or space. This two-part workshop series will help humanities researchers map their place-based research with ArcGIS.

The Spatial Elements of Textual Analysis
The first workshop will cover the nuts and bolts of getting started mapping with ArcGIS. We will discuss how to extract data from your research, get it ready for analysis, and upload it into ArcGIS. The workshop will help humanities researchers explore and map the spatial elements of their research with ArcGIS.

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • extract data from their research;
  • get their data ready for spatial analysis;
  • upload data into ArcGIS Online;
  • use some basic mapping techniques with ArcGIS Online.

Software: ArcGIS Online (participants will not need their own computer)

Workshop page (SFU Canvas): GIS workshops page includes workshop descriptions and suggested streams for different disciplines, handouts, slides, and example datasets

Creating Story Maps
The second workshop will cover spatial analysis - the potential applications of your geographic information. We will demonstrate the analytic functions included in ArcGIS and discuss how to create context for your spatial data. We will also introduce Story Maps, an app that helps turn place-based information into narratives with a combination of maps, images, and text. Note: for this workshop, we will assume that you have already attended the first workshop or are comfortable with the material covered there.

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • create a Story Map;
  • extract spatial context from text.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Monday, March 4, 2019 - 1:00pm to 3:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Lab 2105

Introduction to Spatial Data in Humanities: Creating Story Maps

Many humanities researchers have some form of geographical information included in their research, such as objects, images, or texts from or about a particular place; narratives about a person’s movement or a place’s change over time; or information about networks of people or organizations. Whether places and spaces are at the heart of your research or are a part of it, mapping can help answer research questions and generate new ones by visualizing your data in new ways. It can help tell a story about place or space. This two-part workshop series will help humanities researchers map their place-based research with ArcGIS.

The Spatial Elements of Textual Analysis
The first workshop will cover the nuts and bolts of getting started mapping with ArcGIS. We will discuss how to extract data from your research, get it ready for analysis, and upload it into ArcGIS. The workshop will help humanities researchers explore and map the spatial elements of their research with ArcGIS.

Software: ArcGIS Online (participants will not need their own computer)

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • extract data from their research;
  • get their data ready for spatial analysis;
  • upload data into ArcGIS Online;
  • use some basic mapping techniques with ArcGIS Online.

Creating Story Maps
The second workshop will cover spatial analysis - the potential applications of your geographic information. We will demonstrate the analytic functions included in ArcGIS and discuss how to create context for your spatial data. We will also introduce Story Maps, an app that helps turn place-based information into narratives with a combination of maps, images, and text. Note: for this workshop, we will assume that you have already attended the first workshop or are comfortable with the material covered there.

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • create a Story Map;
  • extract spatial context from text.

Software: ArcGIS Online (participants will not need their own computer)

Workshop page (SFU Canvas): GIS workshops page includes workshop descriptions and suggested streams for different disciplines, handouts, slides, and example datasets

    Upcoming Workshops

    Dates Location
    Tuesday, March 5, 2019 - 1:00pm to 3:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Lab 2105

    EAL/ESL

    Academic Writing for Graduate Students (EAL)

    Academic Writing for Graduate Students is a non-credit, 10-week co-curricular course designed for graduate students for whom English is an additional language (EAL).  You will learn how to apply your analytical skills to the discourses of your chosen disciplines and to explore how effective academic writing in Western scholarly tradition is achieved in order to position yourself as junior scholars in your chosen academic communities. 

    The course is offered as a collaboration between the Student Learning Commons, Research Commons, and The Center for English Learning, Teaching and Research (CELLTR).

    Required textbook (supplied)

    Swales, John M., & Feak, Christine B. (2011). Academic Writing for Graduate Students: Essential Tasks and Skills (3rd Edition). Ann Arbor: U of Michigan Press (ISBN: 978-0472-03475-8).

    To support for the on-going development of students' academic writing skills, the textbook will be provided free of charge to registered students (for this first course offering only), compliments of the Library and The Centre of English Language Learning, Teaching, and Research (CELLTR).


    Spring 2019 term course dates, times, and location:

    January 14 - March 27, 2019
    Mondays and Wednesdays, 10:30 AM-12:20 PM
    Bennett Library, Research Commons, Room 7010

    **NOTE: No classes during Reading Break (February 18-24, 2019)

    Upcoming Workshops

    Dates Location
    Monday, January 14, 2019 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Wednesday, January 16, 2019 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Monday, January 21, 2019 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Wednesday, January 23, 2019 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Monday, January 28, 2019 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Wednesday, January 30, 2019 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Monday, February 4, 2019 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Wednesday, February 6, 2019 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Monday, February 11, 2019 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Wednesday, February 13, 2019 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Monday, February 25, 2019 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Wednesday, February 27, 2019 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Monday, March 4, 2019 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Wednesday, March 6, 2019 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Monday, March 11, 2019 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Wednesday, March 13, 2019 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Monday, March 18, 2019 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Wednesday, March 20, 2019 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Monday, March 25, 2019 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Wednesday, March 27, 2019 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

    Learning

    Research Ethics: Ethics Principles and Institutional Requirements

    The purpose of this session is to engage students in considering and discussing the ethical conduct of research involving humans. A number of topics will be covered, including a brief overview of the ethics review process.

    Upcoming Workshops

    Dates Location
    Saturday, January 19, 2019 - 9:30am to 11:00am Surrey, Galleria 3, Rm 3290

    New Year's Resolution Writing Spectacular

    Get 2019 off to a spectacular start! Join us for a full day of workshops and writing support for graduate students and post-doctoral fellows on Friday January 11 at SFU Harbour Centre in Vancouver. Register for as many workshops as you choose and stay for our dedicated writing time in the afternoon. Morning and afternoon refreshments will be served.

    Sketching Your 2019 Writing Road Map

    In this power-charged mini-workshop, facilitators will help students establish clear writing goals for the New Year and plans of action to achieve them. Key topics will be making a realistic schedule, crafting benchmarks to assess your progress, foreseeing and planning for potential challenges or road blocks, and overall providing a structured path through the seemingly abstract, amorphous journey of thesis writing!

    Upcoming Workshops

    Dates Location
    Friday, January 11, 2019 - 10:00am to 10:45am Harbour Centre, Rm 1315

    Level Up! Tips and Tricks for Research Productivity

    Learn how to keep up with research! In this workshop, we'll go over tips and tricks that can save you time during your research, including setting search and citation alerts, forward chaining, software tools to help with writing reference lists and literature reviews, and more.

    Upcoming Workshops

    Dates Location
    Friday, January 11, 2019 - 11:00am to 11:30am Harbour Centre, Rm 1315

    Key Strategies for Staying on the 2019 Path You’ve Mapped Out (Procrastinate Later!)

    After having constructed a clear path forward in the earlier workshop, now it’s time to talk about how to stay on track! Here we’ll discuss strategies for self-discipline, time-management, and tackling pervasive pitfalls like procrastination and working in a communication void. We’ll also suggest strategic ways of using Research Commons’ space and services to help you meet your 2019 goals!

    Upcoming Workshops

    Dates Location
    Friday, January 11, 2019 - 11:45am to 12:30pm Harbour Centre, Rm 1315

    Research data management

    What is the Open Science Framework (OSF)?

    The OSF is a free, open-source web app that manages research projects at all stages of the research lifecycle. It is used for documentation, file storage, versioning, collaboration, and it connects the various tools researchers currently use. The OSF is produced by the Center for Open Science (COS) and has over 60,000 users across various academic disciplines. Attend the workshop to learn more and explore the OSF.

    Upcoming Workshops

    Dates Location
    Saturday, January 19, 2019 - 11:30am to 1:00pm Surrey, Galleria 3, Rm 3290

    Plan Data

    Collect. Describe. Store. Backup. Preserve. Share.

    Draft a plan to manage your research data and ensure its openness over time. The focus of this workshop will be working with DMP Assistant, an online data management plan utility. A sample case will be provided or build a plan using your research.

    Note: Please bring your own fully charged laptop to this workshop.

    Upcoming Workshops

    Dates Location
    Monday, February 11, 2019 - 10:00am to 11:30am Burnaby, SFU's Big Data Hub (Applied Science Building - Flexible Meeting Room ASB 10908)

    Secure data

    Protect your research data by following strong security practices. This workshop will cover topics including:

    • cloud storage,
    • full disk encryption,
    • threat modelling,
    • communication and file sharing,
    • account security,
    • two-factor authentication (2FA), and
    • digital preservation.

    Learn how to keep data secure with SFU resources.

    Upcoming Workshops

    Dates Location
    Monday, February 11, 2019 - 12:30pm to 2:00pm Burnaby, SFU's Big Data Hub (Applied Science Building - Flexible Meeting Room ASB 10908)

    Clean data

    Do you work with research data in spreadsheets? If so, this workshop is designed for you! We’ll be covering the best practices for Data Organization in Spreadsheets, according to Data Carpentry. Then we’ll look at formatting values, fixing dates, merging/splitting columns, and more. By the end, you’ll be prepared to take your spreadsheets to the next level.

    Upcoming Workshops

    Dates Location
    Monday, February 11, 2019 - 2:30pm to 4:30pm Burnaby, SFU's Big Data Hub (Applied Science Building - Flexible Meeting Room ASB 10908)

    Research programming

    Introduction to Bash shell, Python programming, and Git version control

    We start this 2-day hands-on workshop with an introduction to bash shell, a popular Linux command-line environment. By the end of this hands-on session you will know how to navigate the file system from the command line, how to run basic commands, and how to do more complex things with just a few keystrokes.

    Then we move to Python, a popular language for scientific computing and great for general-purpose programming as well.  This workshop will cover basic concepts and tools, including program design, version control, data management, and task automation. This workshop is offered by The Carpentries, whose mission is to help scientists and engineers get more research done in less time and with less pain by teaching them basic lab skills for scientific computing. 

    Finally the workshop will end with a 3-hour session on Git, the world’s most popular version control system. You will learn how to track your project history in a Git repository, how to work with remote repositories on GitHub, how to collaborate with others using Git, and how to build a free static website with a Git repository on GitHub.

    Participants will need to bring their own computer/laptop. See the "Notes" section at the top for instructions on installing Python and other necessary information.

    Upcoming Workshops

    Dates Location
    Monday, January 21, 2019 - 9:30am to 4:30pm
    Tuesday, January 22, 2019 - 9:30am to 4:30pm
    Burnaby, SFU's Big Data Hub (Applied Science Building - Flexible Meeting Room ASB 10908)

    Research software

    Citation Management

    Level Up! Tips and Tricks for Research Productivity

    Learn how to keep up with research! In this workshop, we'll go over tips and tricks that can save you time during your research, including setting search and citation alerts, forward chaining, software tools to help with writing reference lists and literature reviews, and more.

    Upcoming Workshops

    Dates Location
    Friday, January 11, 2019 - 11:00am to 11:30am Harbour Centre, Rm 1315

    Cite your sources easier and faster with Zotero

    Want to make your research and writing more efficient? Hate the last minute rush of trying to create a correctly formatted bibliography? This workshop is for you! We will introduce Zotero, a citation management tool that can help you import, organize, share, and manage your citations and documents, as well as create correctly formatted in-text citations and bibliographies in almost any style -- in seconds.

    Bring your laptop: this interactive workshop will cover registration, installation, and everything that you need to know to get up and running with Zotero.

    Upcoming Workshops

    Dates Location
    Tuesday, January 22, 2019 - 12:30pm to 1:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons
    Tuesday, January 29, 2019 - 2:00pm to 3:00pm Surrey, Galleria 4, Rm 4040

    Cite your sources easier and faster with Mendeley

    Want to make your research and writing more efficient? Hate the last minute rush of trying to create a correctly formatted bibliography? This workshop is for you! We will introduce Mendeley, a citation management tool that can help you import, organize, share, and manage your citations and documents, as well as create correctly formatted in-text citations and bibliographies in almost any style -- in seconds.

    Bring your laptop: this interactive workshop will cover registration, installation, and everything that you need to know to get up and running with Mendeley.

    Upcoming Workshops

    Dates Location
    Wednesday, January 23, 2019 - 2:30pm to 3:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

    GIS

    Introduction to Spatial Thinking and ArcGIS

    • Which areas in Ontario are susceptible to drought? Which areas are susceptible to longer periods of drought and which to shorter periods?
    • What is the travel route of the Anna's hummingbird (Calypte anna)? Does it pass close to areas where predators are present, specifically those which prey on eggs?
    • Are neighbourhoods with low socioeconomic status spatially correlated to high morbidity rates?

    Many of these questions ask about the spatial relationship between two or more phenomena. This workshop is an introduction to spatial thinking and the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). This workshop assumes attendees have no previous experience with GIS.

    By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

    • think spatially about their research;
    • understand the elements of GIS;
    • use a leading industry software (ArcGIS);
    • create simple maps using geospatial data;
    • look for and find geospatial data and resources.

    Software: ArcGIS Online, ArcGIS Desktop 10.6 (participants will not need their own computer)

    Workshop page (SFU Canvas): GIS workshops page includes workshop descriptions and suggested streams for different disciplines, handouts, slides, and example datasets

    Upcoming Workshops

    Dates Location
    Monday, January 14, 2019 - 2:30pm to 4:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Lab 2105

    Mapping Census Data

    This workshop will cover two very practical skill areas for ArcGIS users:

    • finding Canadian Census data that is accessible to university researchers,
    • and mapping it using ArcGIS software.

    This workshop will guide you through tips for mapping large amounts of census data quickly and for working with spatial patterns and relationships among census variables.

    By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

    • find and choose Census data required for their research;
    • extract relevant Census data from Census files;
    • understand the census spatial units;
    • map census data using census spatial units.

    Software: ArcGIS Online, ArcGIS Desktop (participants will not need their own computer)

    Workshop page (SFU Canvas): GIS workshops page includes workshop descriptions and suggested streams for different disciplines, handouts, slides, and example datasets

    Upcoming Workshops

    Dates Location
    Tuesday, February 5, 2019 - 2:30pm to 4:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Lab 2105

    Introduction to QGIS

    GIS software doesn’t have to be expensive! QGIS is a free, open source GIS platform with powerful tools and wide variety of plugins. Learn how to use the basic tools in QGIS for your spatial projects. 

    Learning Outcomes: By the end of this workshop you will be able to:

    • Import data to and export data from QGIS
    • Edit data within QGIS
    • Do basic vector analysis in QGIS
    • Do basic raster analysis in QGIS
    • Export simple maps using the layout manager

    Software: QGIS (Windows version) - installed on Lab computers

    Core Competencies: vector analysis, raster analysis, data management

    Pre-Requisite: Basic knowledge of GIS and/or some familiarity with ArcGIS. Otherwise, we suggest taking Intro to Spatial Thinking and ArcGIS workshop.

     

    Upcoming Workshops

    Dates Location
    Wednesday, February 6, 2019 - 2:30pm to 4:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Lab 2105

    Introduction to Cartography

    Making a map isn’t difficult, but making a visually appealing map is much harder. A bad map is difficult to understand, and makes viewers more likely to ignore it entirely. A beautiful map will not only better communicate your ideas, but can transform an average poster, paper, or presentation into a great one.

    Learning Outcomes: By the end of this workshop you will be able to:

    • Import data into QGIS (from ArcGIS)
    • Find and use custom basemaps
    • Understand the elements of good cartographic design
    • Use QGIS map layouts to make maps faster and more consistently
    • Export maps for publication

    Software: QGIS (Windows version) - installed on Lab computers

    Core Competencies: cartography, map layout, basemaps

    Upcoming Workshops

    Dates Location
    Thursday, February 7, 2019 - 2:00pm to 4:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Lab 2105

    Intro to Geospatial Data with R

    The lessons in this workshop will cover how to open, work with, and plot vector and raster-format spatial data in R.

    Additional topics include:

    • working with spatial metadata (extent and coordinate reference systems),
    • reprojecting spatial data,
    • and working with raster time series data.

    By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

    • import and export raster and vector data from R;
    • analyze and edit raster and vector data;
    • explore spatio-temporal data in R.

    This full-day workshop will follow the Data Carpentries' syllabus.

    Prerequisites:

    Software requirements:

    • Participants will need to bring their own laptops with the most recent version of R and Rstudio installed. For installation instructions and to download the data used in this lesson, see the workshop homepage.

    Workshop page (SFU Canvas): GIS workshops page includes workshop descriptions and suggested streams for different disciplines, handouts, slides, and example datasets

    Upcoming Workshops

    Dates Location
    Tuesday, February 12, 2019 - 9:00am to 5:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Lab 2105

    Mapping Socio-Demographic Data in QGIS

    This workshop is intended as a gentle introduction to GIS. No prior GIS or ArcMap experience is needed. The emphasis is on the novice user who is curious about how to use GIS software for their research.

    The workshop will discuss different types of geospatial data sources and alternative GIS tools (e.g. SimplyAnalytics) and then provide a hands-on workshop focused on creating a map in ArcMap using 2016 Census data, Vancouver neighbourhood boundaries, homeless shelter and non-market housing point datasets accessible through the City of Vancouver Open Data Catalogue.

    The Lab is equipped with QGIS so you don't need to bring a laptop, although you are welcome to bring one if you would prefer.

     

    Upcoming Workshops

    Dates Location
    Wednesday, February 27, 2019 - 9:30am to 11:00am Burnaby, Bennett Library, Lab 2105

    Introduction to Spatial Data in Humanities: The Spatial Elements of Textual Analysis

    Many humanities researchers have some form of geographical information included in their research, such as objects, images, or texts from or about a particular place; narratives about a person’s movement or a place’s change over time; or information about networks of people or organizations. Whether places and spaces are at the heart of your research or are a part of it, mapping can help answer research questions and generate new ones by visualizing your data in new ways. It can help tell a story about place or space. This two-part workshop series will help humanities researchers map their place-based research with ArcGIS.

    The Spatial Elements of Textual Analysis
    The first workshop will cover the nuts and bolts of getting started mapping with ArcGIS. We will discuss how to extract data from your research, get it ready for analysis, and upload it into ArcGIS. The workshop will help humanities researchers explore and map the spatial elements of their research with ArcGIS.

    By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

    • extract data from their research;
    • get their data ready for spatial analysis;
    • upload data into ArcGIS Online;
    • use some basic mapping techniques with ArcGIS Online.

    Software: ArcGIS Online (participants will not need their own computer)

    Workshop page (SFU Canvas): GIS workshops page includes workshop descriptions and suggested streams for different disciplines, handouts, slides, and example datasets

    Creating Story Maps
    The second workshop will cover spatial analysis - the potential applications of your geographic information. We will demonstrate the analytic functions included in ArcGIS and discuss how to create context for your spatial data. We will also introduce Story Maps, an app that helps turn place-based information into narratives with a combination of maps, images, and text. Note: for this workshop, we will assume that you have already attended the first workshop or are comfortable with the material covered there.

    By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

    • create a Story Map;
    • extract spatial context from text.

    Upcoming Workshops

    Dates Location
    Monday, March 4, 2019 - 1:00pm to 3:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Lab 2105

    Introduction to Spatial Data in Humanities: Creating Story Maps

    Many humanities researchers have some form of geographical information included in their research, such as objects, images, or texts from or about a particular place; narratives about a person’s movement or a place’s change over time; or information about networks of people or organizations. Whether places and spaces are at the heart of your research or are a part of it, mapping can help answer research questions and generate new ones by visualizing your data in new ways. It can help tell a story about place or space. This two-part workshop series will help humanities researchers map their place-based research with ArcGIS.

    The Spatial Elements of Textual Analysis
    The first workshop will cover the nuts and bolts of getting started mapping with ArcGIS. We will discuss how to extract data from your research, get it ready for analysis, and upload it into ArcGIS. The workshop will help humanities researchers explore and map the spatial elements of their research with ArcGIS.

    Software: ArcGIS Online (participants will not need their own computer)

    By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

    • extract data from their research;
    • get their data ready for spatial analysis;
    • upload data into ArcGIS Online;
    • use some basic mapping techniques with ArcGIS Online.

    Creating Story Maps
    The second workshop will cover spatial analysis - the potential applications of your geographic information. We will demonstrate the analytic functions included in ArcGIS and discuss how to create context for your spatial data. We will also introduce Story Maps, an app that helps turn place-based information into narratives with a combination of maps, images, and text. Note: for this workshop, we will assume that you have already attended the first workshop or are comfortable with the material covered there.

    By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

    • create a Story Map;
    • extract spatial context from text.

    Software: ArcGIS Online (participants will not need their own computer)

    Workshop page (SFU Canvas): GIS workshops page includes workshop descriptions and suggested streams for different disciplines, handouts, slides, and example datasets

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Tuesday, March 5, 2019 - 1:00pm to 3:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Lab 2105

      Introduction to Web Cartography

      Take your cartography to the next level by making your maps interactive and online! An interactive map helps your map viewers explore your data with greater detail and control. In this workshop, we’ll use open source software to turn our shapefiles into interactive online maps.

      Learning Outcomes: By the end of this workshop you will be able to:

      • Export data from QGIS to a web-readable format (GeoJSON)
      • Create a Leaflet-based web map
      • Customize the styling in that web map

      Software: QGIS, Leaflet, HTML & CSS

      Core Competencies: web mapping, cartography

      Pre-Requisite: Some familiarity with ArcGIS or QGIS, and have used/dabbled in HTML and CSS but may not be fluent in them.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Monday, March 18, 2019 - 2:00pm to 4:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Lab 2105

      Advanced GIS: Raster Data Analysis

      Raster data is continuous, pixelated data. For example, aerial photographs, LIDAR data, and digital elevation models store information as raster data. In contrast, vector data is discrete and is stored as geometric objects: points, lines and polygons. The tools available to you, and the kind of analysis you can conduct, with raster data are different than those for vector data. This session will focus on working with raster data in ArcGIS.

      By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

      • distinguish between different types of raster data;
      • work with digital elevation models (DEMs);
      • explore raster surface data (hill shade, contour, aspect data);
      • create and work with mosaic datasets.

      Software: ArcGIS Desktop 10.6 (participants will not need their own computer)

      Workshop page (SFU Canvas): GIS workshops page includes workshop descriptions and suggested streams for different disciplines, handouts, slides, and example datasets

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Tuesday, March 19, 2019 - 2:30pm to 4:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Lab 2105

      Python

      Introduction to Bash shell, Python programming, and Git version control

      We start this 2-day hands-on workshop with an introduction to bash shell, a popular Linux command-line environment. By the end of this hands-on session you will know how to navigate the file system from the command line, how to run basic commands, and how to do more complex things with just a few keystrokes.

      Then we move to Python, a popular language for scientific computing and great for general-purpose programming as well.  This workshop will cover basic concepts and tools, including program design, version control, data management, and task automation. This workshop is offered by The Carpentries, whose mission is to help scientists and engineers get more research done in less time and with less pain by teaching them basic lab skills for scientific computing. 

      Finally the workshop will end with a 3-hour session on Git, the world’s most popular version control system. You will learn how to track your project history in a Git repository, how to work with remote repositories on GitHub, how to collaborate with others using Git, and how to build a free static website with a Git repository on GitHub.

      Participants will need to bring their own computer/laptop. See the "Notes" section at the top for instructions on installing Python and other necessary information.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Monday, January 21, 2019 - 9:30am to 4:30pm
      Tuesday, January 22, 2019 - 9:30am to 4:30pm
      Burnaby, SFU's Big Data Hub (Applied Science Building - Flexible Meeting Room ASB 10908)

      Qualitative Data Analysis

      Making Literature Reviews Easier with NVivo for Mac

      This interactive workshop introduces importing and coding of literature review materials and key tools that can be particularly helpful when reviewing literature in your area of research.

      Topics covered include:

      • introducing NVivo and setting up a project
      • working with your information
      • identifying themes, topics and ideas and collecting data to support them
      • using tools such as text search query, matrix coding query, and Framework Matrix.

      What will you achieve from this session? You will have the knowledge to set up a literature review in NVivo, and begin to work with your information. You will also be able to use NVivo to organize your content and begin to identify themes, topics or ideas. It is appropriate for those who have had some experience with NVivo. For more information about NVivo at SFU, please visit NVivo Software for Research Analysis.

      Participants should also have some familiarity with citation management software (Zotero, Mendeley, Refworks, EndNote, etc). Zotero will be used during this workshop.

      Note: You will need to bring your own Mac laptop, loaded with the latest version of NVivo for Mac.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Saturday, January 19, 2019 - 9:30am to 11:00am Surrey

      Introduction to NVivo for Windows

      NVivo is a qualitative data analysis software program, but what does that mean -- and what does it mean for your research? Find out what NVivo is, when to use it, and how to get started.

      In this hands-on introductory workshop, you'll take a tour of the NVivo software environment, using sample data. You’ll be introduced to NVivo’s functions and you’ll leave equipped with the basic info you need to begin working with NVivo. Topics introduced may include importing files and beginning coding.

      This workshop is suitable for those with little or no experience using NVivo or other qualitative data analysis software.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Tuesday, January 22, 2019 - 9:30am to 11:00am Burnaby, Bennett Library, Lab 4009
      Wednesday, January 30, 2019 - 1:30pm to 3:00pm Harbour Centre, Lab 1350

      Introduction to NVivo for Mac

      NVivo is a qualitative data analysis software program, but what does that mean -- and what does it mean for your research? Find out what NVivo is, when to use it, and how to get started.

      In this hands-on introductory workshop, you'll take a tour of the NVivo software environment, using sample data. You’ll be introduced to NVivo’s functions and you’ll leave equipped with the basic info you need to begin working with NVivo. Topics introduced may include importing files and beginning coding.

      This workshop is suitable for those with little or no experience using NVivo or other qualitative data analysis software.

      Notes:
      1. This workshop is for NVivo for Mac. The Windows interface is significantly different. Please check here for NVivo for Windows workshops being offered.
      2. Please bring your own Mac laptop preloaded with the latest version of NVivo. You can download NVivo and the license key with your SFU computing ID by using the self-serve download link here. If you are unable to get past the authentication page, then please email nvivo-rc@sfu.ca.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Thursday, January 24, 2019 - 1:00pm to 2:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons
      Thursday, January 31, 2019 - 12:30pm to 2:00pm Surrey

      Advanced NVivo for Windows

      Need help moving forward with your qualitative data analysis? If you’re already comfortable with bringing in documents and coding them, you’re ready to move on to analyzing your material. In this hands-on workshop, Graduate Peer NVivo Facilitators will walk you through visualizations and queries using sample data and may be able to address other topics depending on the needs of the group.

      PREREQUISITE:
      Before registering for this workshop, you must be familiar with coding in NVivo and/or have already taken the Introduction to NVivo workshop.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Tuesday, February 26, 2019 - 1:00pm to 2:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Lab 4009

      Advanced NVivo for Mac

      Need help moving forward with your qualitative data analysis? If you’re already comfortable with bringing in documents and coding them, you’re ready to move on to analyzing your material. In this hands-on workshop, Graduate Peer NVivo Facilitators will walk you through visualizations and queries using sample data and may be able to address other topics depending on the needs of the group.

      This is a BYOL workshop: Bring Your Own Laptop, with the latest version of NVivo for Mac installed on it.

      PREREQUISITE:
      Before registering for this workshop, you must be familiar with coding in NVivo and/or have already taken the Introduction to NVivo workshop.

       

       

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Thursday, February 28, 2019 - 9:30am to 11:00am Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

      Making Literature Reviews Easier with NVivo for Windows

      This interactive workshop introduces importing and coding of literature review materials and key tools that can be particularly helpful when reviewing literature in your area of research.

      Topics covered include:

      • introducing NVivo and setting up a project
      • working with your information
      • identifying themes, topics and ideas and collecting data to support them
      • using tools such as text search query, matrix coding query, and Framework Matrix.

      What will you achieve from this session? You will have the knowledge to set up a literature review in NVivo, and begin to work with your information. You will also be able to use NVivo to organize your content and begin to identify themes, topics or ideas. It is appropriate for those who have had some experience with NVivo. For more information about NVivo at SFU, please visit NVivo Software for Research Analysis.

      Participants should also have some familiarity with citation management software (Zotero, Mendeley, Refworks, EndNote, etc). Zotero will be used during this workshop.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Wednesday, March 13, 2019 - 9:30am to 11:00am Burnaby, Bennett Library, Lab 4009

      R (Software)

      Introduction to R (2-day workshop)

      This two day workshop introduces the programming language R.  R is an open-source, widely used, and increasingly popular tool for statistical and data analyses, text mining, geospatial analysis, modelling, and a growing number of other applications. No prior knowledge is required. Students will learn the skills needed to start analyzing their own data.

      The topics covered include:

      • the R environment (directories, workspace, scripts, and packages),
      • simple commands to get you started,
      • data structures (vector, matrix, data frames, lists),
      • basic data analysis tools (built-in statistical packages, plotting, etc.)

       As time permits, an introduction to functions may also be covered.

      Requirements:

      • Participants need to bring a laptop with the latest versions of R and RStudio installed.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Saturday, January 26, 2019 - 9:30am to 4:30pm
      Sunday, January 27, 2019 - 9:30am to 4:30pm
      Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7200
      Tuesday, February 12, 2019 - 9:30am to 4:30pm
      Wednesday, February 13, 2019 - 9:30am to 4:30pm
      Burnaby, SFU's Big Data Hub (Applied Science Building - Flexible Meeting Room ASB 10908)

      Intro to Geospatial Data with R

      The lessons in this workshop will cover how to open, work with, and plot vector and raster-format spatial data in R.

      Additional topics include:

      • working with spatial metadata (extent and coordinate reference systems),
      • reprojecting spatial data,
      • and working with raster time series data.

      By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

      • import and export raster and vector data from R;
      • analyze and edit raster and vector data;
      • explore spatio-temporal data in R.

      This full-day workshop will follow the Data Carpentries' syllabus.

      Prerequisites:

      Software requirements:

      • Participants will need to bring their own laptops with the most recent version of R and Rstudio installed. For installation instructions and to download the data used in this lesson, see the workshop homepage.

      Workshop page (SFU Canvas): GIS workshops page includes workshop descriptions and suggested streams for different disciplines, handouts, slides, and example datasets

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Tuesday, February 12, 2019 - 9:00am to 5:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Lab 2105

      Introduction to R for Non-Science Majors (2-day workshop)

      This workshop is designed for non-science students interested in the statistical computing program R. No prior knowledge of R is required. Often data outside of the sciences includes textual data, such as a corpus or series of surveys. In this workshop we’ll learn how to process textual data in R, as well as the basic skills to start analyzing it. Specific topics covered include the R environment (directories, workspace, scripts, and packages), data structures (vector, matrix, data frames, lists), and the beginnings of simple data analysis (built-in statistical packages, elementary statistics, etc.).

      Note: Workshop participants will need to bring their own laptops, with R and RStudio installed prior to attending the workshop.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Saturday, February 16, 2019 - 9:30am to 4:30pm
      Sunday, February 17, 2019 - 9:30am to 4:30pm
      Burnaby, SFU's Big Data Hub (Applied Science Building - Flexible Meeting Room ASB 10908)

      Statistics

      Next semester's workshops will be posted soon.

      Visual Analytics

      An Introduction to Using Tableau for Data Visualization

      Tableau is a data visualization tool that is being used to help analyze data and illustrate the patterns and insights behind them. This interactive workshop will introduce researchers or students to Tableau Public, a free access version of Tableau.

      Requirements:

      • No prior experience with Tableau is necessary.
      • Participants will need to bring their own laptop preloaded with the latest version of Tableau Public

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Friday, February 8, 2019 - 9:30am to 11:30am Harbour Centre, Rm 2245

      Scholarly communication

      Communicate with Purpose and Intent

      Do you feel lost or challenged when communicating your research to audiences who are non subject matter experts?  When you're asked about what your research is about, do you often feel it may be too complicated to explain, or you feel as though you must provide all the details for your audience to understand? In most situations, constraints with time limits what and how we can communicate with our research.  This workshop session will address some of those questions and provide strategies for communicating your research with purpose and intent.  If you are preparing for an upcoming presentation or just curious about how you can further develop your communication skills, we invite you to join us for this interactive workshop. 

      Dr. Poh Tan is an entrepreneur, a stem cell biologist, an educator, a volunteer and a mother.  She has made substantive contributions to many different fields and has made positive impacts on many people’s lives throughout her career. Poh’s current focus is on inspiring young children and their educators to use scientific thinking as a tool to open up their world and courageously walk into a bright future full of limitless possibilities.  Poh obtained her first PhD from the Faculty of Medicine at UBC focusing on the biology of blood stem cells. Her experience led her to a successful career in the biotechnology sector and eventually, helped her become a successful entrepreneur with two businesses.  Poh's passion lies in developing scientific literacy in young children and is currently pursuing a second PhD at SFU.  Through her academic and industry experience, Poh has communicated her research to national and international audiences, including sharing her knowledge as a two time TEDx speaker.  She coaches graduate students to develop their oral and written skills to effectively communicate their research to different types of audiences.     

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Saturday, January 19, 2019 - 9:30am to 11:00am Surrey, Galleria 3, Rm 3280

      Preparing to Publish

      Graduate students are always encouraged to publish but often without really knowing what that means or how to start. This workshop will focus on navigating the peer review process and will also touch on the topics of open access, working with an editor, and co-authorship.  It will include a discussion of copyright transfer agreements and licenses and provide insight into publishing venues for assuring your research has the best possible visibility, accessibility, and impact.

      A few questions this session will help to answer:

      • How does the publishing cycle work?
      • How can you assess potential publishing venues?
      • What is peer review and how can you respond to reviewer comments?
      • What rights can you retain to your published research?
      • What are predatory publishers and how can you avoid them?

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Saturday, January 19, 2019 - 2:00pm to 3:30pm Surrey, Galleria 3, Rm 3290

      Preparing to Publish

      Graduate students are always encouraged to publish but often without really knowing what that means or how to start. This workshop will focus on navigating the peer review process and will also touch on the topics of open access, working with an editor, and co-authorship.  It will include a discussion of copyright transfer agreements and licenses and provide insight into publishing venues for assuring your research has the best possible visibility, accessibility, and impact.

      A few questions this session will help to answer:

      • How does the publishing cycle work?
      • How can you assess potential publishing venues?
      • What is peer review and how can you respond to reviewer comments?
      • What rights can you retain to your published research?
      • What are predatory publishers and how can you avoid them?

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Friday, February 1, 2019 - 10:00am to 12:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

      What's Your Impact?: An Introduction to Measuring the Impact of Your Research Within and Beyond the Academy

      Who is looking at your research and how can you measure it? Find out more about research impact – what it is, how to measure it and how to leverage it. This session will help you:

      • understand what is meant by research impact,
      • become familiar with the different types of research impact metrics,
      • know the tools available to calculate research impact.
      • and devise a strategy to increase the impact of your own research activities.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Friday, February 1, 2019 - 1:00pm to 2:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

      Building an Online Academic Presence


      This workshop will look at the big picture and context for developing your online academic narrative: why do you want an academic presence? How do you get your work out there? The workshop will provide a hands-on introduction to tools for privacy, social media, and auditing and building your online academic portfolio. You will learn about ORCID, ImpactStory, ResearchGate, Academia.edu and other networking and academic profile websites. We will help you evaluate and successfully use the appropriate tools to promote your research and professional experience.

      Note: Bring your own fully charged laptop.
       

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Friday, February 1, 2019 - 2:45pm to 4:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

      Writing

      Graduate Open Writing Lab: Write Time, Write Space (drop-in)

      The Graduate Open Writing Lab is for all graduate students who want the time and a quiet, dedicated space to work on their writing. A Graduate Writing Facilitator will be available for consultations and to answer questions.

      Registration not required - please drop in!

      Spring Semester 2019 [January 7 to April 5]

      Burnaby Campus
      Graduate Open Writing Lab  - Mondays, 2:00 pm to 4:30 pm, SFU Burnaby, W.A.C. Bennett Library, Research Commons, Rm 7010
      (no session February 18)

      Vancouver Campus
      Graduate Open Writing Lab - Fridays, 11:30 am to 2:30 pm, SFU Vancouver, Harbour Centre - Room HC 7400*
      *January 11, it will take place in Room HC 1315, from 1:30pm to 4:30pm as part of New Year's Resolution Writing Spectacular

      Writing Workshops

      Please register for the following writing workshops:

      Write Conversations: What is Your Research Question?

      One or several research questions (RQs) should be the backbone of your research process from start to finish. Your RQs guide your research, ground your analyses, and focus your writing. A project’s RQs may require slight adjustments here and there but should never be lost entirely. Come to this discussion to re-ground your research or writing process in this foundational element, and possibly even practice clearly stating (or re-stating) your research questions.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Monday, January 7, 2019 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

      Sketching Your 2019 Writing Road Map

      In this power-charged mini-workshop, facilitators will help students establish clear writing goals for the New Year and plans of action to achieve them. Key topics will be making a realistic schedule, crafting benchmarks to assess your progress, foreseeing and planning for potential challenges or road blocks, and overall providing a structured path through the seemingly abstract, amorphous journey of thesis writing!

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Friday, January 11, 2019 - 10:00am to 10:45am Harbour Centre, Rm 1315

      Level Up! Tips and Tricks for Research Productivity

      Learn how to keep up with research! In this workshop, we'll go over tips and tricks that can save you time during your research, including setting search and citation alerts, forward chaining, software tools to help with writing reference lists and literature reviews, and more.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Friday, January 11, 2019 - 11:00am to 11:30am Harbour Centre, Rm 1315

      Key Strategies for Staying on the 2019 Path You’ve Mapped Out (Procrastinate Later!)

      After having constructed a clear path forward in the earlier workshop, now it’s time to talk about how to stay on track! Here we’ll discuss strategies for self-discipline, time-management, and tackling pervasive pitfalls like procrastination and working in a communication void. We’ll also suggest strategic ways of using Research Commons’ space and services to help you meet your 2019 goals!

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Friday, January 11, 2019 - 11:45am to 12:30pm Harbour Centre, Rm 1315

      Write Conversations: The Writing Process

      Is your writing style fast & furious, or slow & steady? Let's discuss the pros and cons of different approaches to writing, and strategize how to become more productive.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Monday, January 14, 2019 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

      Write Conversations: Writing as Practice and Process

      This workshop will begin with a discussion on writing as process and then explore goal setting and outlining. Following this this workshop is the Graduate Open Writing Lab; you are welcome to stay and work on your writing.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Friday, January 18, 2019 - 10:30am to 11:30am Harbour Centre, Rm 7400

      Writing and Researching Your Literature Review

      This interactive workshop focuses on the literature review and literature search. At this session you will learn:

      • conventions of literature reviews,
      • search strategies,
      • advanced features of research databases,
      • and tips to further develop effective and efficient research skills.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Saturday, January 19, 2019 - 11:30am to 1:15pm Surrey, Galleria 3, Rm 3280

      Preparing to Publish

      Graduate students are always encouraged to publish but often without really knowing what that means or how to start. This workshop will focus on navigating the peer review process and will also touch on the topics of open access, working with an editor, and co-authorship.  It will include a discussion of copyright transfer agreements and licenses and provide insight into publishing venues for assuring your research has the best possible visibility, accessibility, and impact.

      A few questions this session will help to answer:

      • How does the publishing cycle work?
      • How can you assess potential publishing venues?
      • What is peer review and how can you respond to reviewer comments?
      • What rights can you retain to your published research?
      • What are predatory publishers and how can you avoid them?

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Saturday, January 19, 2019 - 2:00pm to 3:30pm Surrey, Galleria 3, Rm 3290

      Write Conversations: What is the Difference between a Conceptual Outline and a Thesis Template?

      What’s in an outline? Hint: More than simply the words “Introduction,” “Chapters 2-5” and “Conclusion”! Occasionally, students confuse the organizing structure of the thesis template for the need for a more in-depth, conceptual outline that will help you clarify (to yourself and to your supervisor) the substance of what you plan to say in your thesis and how you are considering organizing that substance. Conceptual outlines are important tools for both the writing process and for facilitating communication. Join the conversation today to get answers to all of your outlining questions!

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Monday, January 21, 2019 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

      Write Conversations: Concision: Less is More

      Drowning in words? Get to the point. Say more with less. We'll review how to recognize and cut wordiness and redundancy. By applying these strategies, you'll see immediate improvements in sentence clarity!

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Friday, January 25, 2019 - 10:30am to 11:30am Harbour Centre, Rm 7400

      Write Conversations: The Work We Do Prior to Writing: Planning, Outlining, and Strategies for Starting

      Writing shorter pieces was just so much simpler. Now that we are working on longer pieces like graduate term papers, articles, capstone projects, and theses, the writing process has become longer and more complex. Join our conversation about conceptualizing the steps involved in writing longer works, and how certain planning and outlining strategies can help you get started. Getting started sounds simple enough… until it’s time to do it!

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Monday, January 28, 2019 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

      Preparing to Publish

      Graduate students are always encouraged to publish but often without really knowing what that means or how to start. This workshop will focus on navigating the peer review process and will also touch on the topics of open access, working with an editor, and co-authorship.  It will include a discussion of copyright transfer agreements and licenses and provide insight into publishing venues for assuring your research has the best possible visibility, accessibility, and impact.

      A few questions this session will help to answer:

      • How does the publishing cycle work?
      • How can you assess potential publishing venues?
      • What is peer review and how can you respond to reviewer comments?
      • What rights can you retain to your published research?
      • What are predatory publishers and how can you avoid them?

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Friday, February 1, 2019 - 10:00am to 12:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

      Write Conversations: Critical Research, Reading, and Writing

      This workshop will begin with a discussion of strategies for critical reading and note-taking and then explore how these skills contribute to critical writing for a literature review. Following this workshop is the Graduate Open Writing Lab; you are welcome to stay and work on your writing.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Friday, February 1, 2019 - 10:30am to 11:30am Harbour Centre, Rm 7400

      Write Conversations: Lay Language

      Lay language is needed in order to convey technical and advanced ideas in ways that are more effective than “dumbing it down”. You may be preparing a grant or fellowship proposal, writing for online purposes or fine tuning your “job talk”— all of which require you to translate your work and research to persons outside of your core field of study.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Monday, February 4, 2019 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

      Write Conversations: Finding Your Voice

      Academic writing can be more than boring readers and emulating stuffy styles. In fact, expressing complex ideas in your own voice can be one of the best ways to make your work stand out. Join us for a conversation on conformity, creativity, and originality and begin your journey toward discovering your academic voice.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Friday, February 8, 2019 - 10:30am to 11:30am Harbour Centre, Rm 7400
      Monday, February 11, 2019 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

      Thesis Boot Camp

      This multi-day boot camp is for SFU graduate students at both the PhD and Masters level, who are currently writing their thesis or dissertation.

      Here's your opportunity to dedicate three days to making serious progress on your dissertation or master’s thesis. Along with a comfortable, quiet working environment, snacks and lunches, you will benefit from structured time, dedicated space, professional advising and peer support—all motivating factors in that final push towards completion of your dissertation or thesis.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Tuesday, February 12, 2019 - 8:30am to 5:00pm
      Wednesday, February 13, 2019 - 8:30am to 5:00pm
      Thursday, February 14, 2019 - 8:30am to 5:00pm
      Harbour Centre, Rm 1410-1430

      Write Conversations: Everything in 250 words or less: Writing abstracts

      Wondering how you can put all of that crucial information about your research into just one paragraph? Join today’s discussion for some tips to master this pesky task that follows so much of our hard work. Even 250 words can make a difference in selling your potential audience on the value of your research!

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Friday, February 15, 2019 - 10:30am to 11:30am Harbour Centre, Rm 7400

      Write Conversations: Managing Writing Anxiety

      Being anxious about academic writing can lead to unhelpful writing habits like avoidance and procrastination. Join us for a discussion on how to make more progress by alleviating writing anxiety!

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Monday, February 25, 2019 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

      Write Conversations: What is a Literature Review?

      Believe it or not, it’s not just a long summary of relevant literature. Your literature review serves many purposes including improving your research, focusing your thesis or project, and perhaps most importantly, aptly demonstrating your new-found expertise to your reader while providing a strong first impression for your final written product.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Monday, March 4, 2019 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

      Write Conversations: "You're reader is a little bit drunk": Writing Clearly for an Audience of Sleep-Deprived Academics

      Today’s informal workshop borrows its name from a 2018 University Affairs article with the same title, written by Letitia Henville. Writing for an audience of academics has unique benefits and challenges: these individuals are intelligent, willing to read, and might even have high interest in your topic, but they are also indescribably busy, likely sleep-deprived, and are juggling a multitude of priorities. Join us today for some tips on how to get your message across to readers whose demanding schedules might leave them feeling a bit intoxicated by the time they open your file!

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Monday, March 11, 2019 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

      Write Conversations: Writing More Concisely

      Get to the point. Say more in fewer words. Bring your own strategies for writing concisely and learn some new ones, too. As Dante reminds us: “Let thy words be counted.”

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Monday, March 18, 2019 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons
      Monday, March 18, 2019 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

      Write Conversations: Transition Words and How to Use Them

      Are you getting feedback that your writing is “choppy”? Are you overusing certain transitional words and phrases like “however” or “on the other hand”? Join today’s discussion on how to use transitions thoughtfully so that your reader can comprehend your writing with ease and clarity.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Monday, March 25, 2019 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

      Write Conversations: The Home Stretch: Revising and Proofreading

      Knowing when to revise, what to look for, and when it's time to proofread will help you edit your own writing more effectively.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Friday, March 29, 2019 - 10:30am to 11:30am Harbour Centre, Rm 7400

      Write Conversations: Don't Plagiarize: Understanding how to Paraphrase

      Learning how to accurately and skillfully use our own words to describe other scholar’s ideas remains a challenging process for many graduate students, and understandably so. While practicing and improving paraphrasing is guaranteed to level-up your writing, doing so without plagiarizing can and should be an ongoing concern. Come to this discussion to learn more about that foreboding beast "plagiarism," and its lesser known version "patch writing," so that you are better able to both spot it in students' writing and avoid it in your own.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Monday, April 1, 2019 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons
      Monday, April 1, 2019 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

      Thesis

      Thesis Boot Camp

      This multi-day boot camp is for SFU graduate students at both the PhD and Masters level, who are currently writing their thesis or dissertation.

      Here's your opportunity to dedicate three days to making serious progress on your dissertation or master’s thesis. Along with a comfortable, quiet working environment, snacks and lunches, you will benefit from structured time, dedicated space, professional advising and peer support—all motivating factors in that final push towards completion of your dissertation or thesis.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Tuesday, February 12, 2019 - 8:30am to 5:00pm
      Wednesday, February 13, 2019 - 8:30am to 5:00pm
      Thursday, February 14, 2019 - 8:30am to 5:00pm
      Harbour Centre, Rm 1410-1430

      Thesis template and resources: How to use it and where to find help

      This demonstration introduces you to the Thesis Assistance wepageThesis Submission process and the Thesis Template. This workshop will be broken down into four parts:

      1. It will begin with an introduction to required copyright permissions from the Copyright Office at SFU. (about 30 minutes)
      2. SFU Library's research data specialists will give instruction on how to preserve and, if appropriate, share research data for future uses. (about 15 minutes)
      3. The Theses Office will provide an overview of the Thesis Assistant website and go over the overall submission process (including deadlines and supporting documentation). (about 30 to 40 minutes)
      4. The technical part of the workshop will follow, where you will be walked through the overall structure of your thesis and the functionality of the thesis template. (about 30 to 40 minutes)

      Students are encouraged to bring their own computer and thesis document(s) to work along with the facilitator during the workshop.

      Learn how to:

      • request copyright permissions (if your thesis includes reproductions of copyright protected images, including  figures, drawings, paintings, photographs, logos, maps, diagrams, tables or charts, and even screen captures on the web, then you might need to request copyright permission)
      • write in the MS Word template-based file
      • format your text using styles
      • bring text in from other documents
      • insert figures, images, and auto-numbered captions
      • generate the Table of Contents, List of Tables, List of Figures, etc.

      If you’ve begun writing, send your document to theses@sfu.ca in advance of the workshop; one might be used in demonstrating the Library’s thesis template. After the session, the formatted document will be returned in which the student can continue his/her work.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Thursday, January 17, 2019 - 10:30am to 12:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons
      Wednesday, February 6, 2019 - 1:30pm to 3:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons
      Thursday, March 7, 2019 - 10:30am to 12:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons
      Wednesday, April 3, 2019 - 1:30pm to 3:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons