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Research Commons: Workshops for graduate students & postdoctoral fellows

 

During COVID-19, Research Commons' services continue.

SFU graduate students are encouraged to book consultations with the Research Commons staff and partners. Consultations are available by phone, via email, or through online video-conference.

Not finding what you're looking for? Please get in touch with us at research-commons@sfu.ca so we can discuss your research support needs. 

 

The Research Commons is pleased to offer you a range of workshops, developed in the context of SFU Library's Instruction Strategy. You can register for upcoming workshops and search by workshop date in our workshops calendar.  

If you do not see the topic(s) you are interested in and/or would like a specialized workshop for yourself and a group of colleagues, please send a request to research-commons@sfu.ca.

SFU values diversity and is committed to inclusion. If you require any disability-related accommodations in order to fully access and participate in our workshops and/or events, please contact us directly at library-workshops@sfu.ca. All communication will be kept confidential. Please contact us as early as possible as some accommodations will require lead time to arrange (i.e. CART, ASL)

Unaffiliated with SFU but interested in attending a workshop? See Who can register for SFU Library Research Commons workshops.

Digital Humanities workshops

Minimal Computing, or When Wordpress No Longer Sparks Joy [Online]

This workshop introduces participants to the various ideas and practices clustered under the term “minimal computing.” Defined by the Global Outlook::Digital Humanities group as “computing done under some set of significant constraints,” minimal computing offers a set of techniques for creating low-maintenance digital resources that are not only inexpensive (both in terms of material resources and technical debt), but are also sustainable and archivable (https://go-dh.github.io/mincomp/about/).

This 90-minute workshop will begin with a broad overview of the recent surge in academic interest surrounding minimal computing, particularly in the context of the GLAM sector (galleries, libraries, archives, and museums), and will introduce participants to some of the reigning technologies available for creating minimal computing resources. Specifically, the workshop will show participants how to publish their own blog, research website, digital edition, or critical exhibit for free using Github and the static website generator, Jekyll.

Prerequisites: No technical experience necessary, but previous participation in the Github Workshop is encouraged.

Register for upcoming workshops

Dates Location
Tuesday, November 17, 2020 - 11:00am to 12:30pm via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

Introduction to the Spatial Elements of Textual Analysis [Online]

Many humanities researchers have some form of geographical information included in their research, such as objects, images, or texts from or about a particular place; narratives about a person’s movement or a place’s change over time; or information about networks of people or organizations. Whether places and spaces are at the heart of your research or are a part of it, mapping can help answer research questions and generate new ones by visualizing your data in new ways. It can help tell a story about place or space. 

This workshop will cover the nuts and bolts of getting started mapping with ArcGIS. We will discuss how to extract data from your research, get it ready for analysis, and upload it into ArcGIS. The workshop will help humanities researchers explore and map the spatial elements of their research with ArcGIS.

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • extract data from their research;
  • get their data ready for spatial analysis;
  • upload data into ArcGIS Online;
  • use some basic mapping techniques with ArcGIS Online.

Software: ArcGIS Online. You do not need to install any software. However, if you wish to participate during the hands-on portion, please send an email to gis-software@sfu.ca at least one day ahead of workshop date to request an ArcGIS online account.

Workshop page (SFU Canvas): GIS workshops page includes workshop descriptions and suggested streams for different disciplines, handouts, slides, and example datasets.

Register for upcoming workshops

Dates Location
Thursday, November 19, 2020 - 10:00am to 12:00pm via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

Introduction to Spatial Data in Humanities: Creating Story Maps [Online]

Many humanities researchers have some form of geographical information included in their research, such as objects, images, or texts from or about a particular place; narratives about a person’s movement or a place’s change over time; or information about networks of people or organizations. Whether places and spaces are at the heart of your research or are a part of it, mapping can help answer research questions and generate new ones by visualizing your data in new ways. It can help tell a story about place or space. 

This workshop will cover spatial analysis - the potential applications of your geographic information. We will demonstrate the analytic functions included in ArcGIS and discuss how to create context for your spatial data. We will also introduce Story Maps, an app that helps turn place-based information into narratives with a combination of maps, images, and text. Note: for this workshop, we will assume that you have already attended the first workshop or are comfortable with the material covered there.

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • create a Story Map;
  • extract spatial context from text.

Software: ArcGIS Online. You do not need to install any software. However, if you wish to participate during the hands-on portion, please send an email to gis-software@sfu.ca at least one day before the workshop date to request an ArcGIS online account.

Workshop page (SFU Canvas): GIS workshops page includes workshop descriptions and suggested streams for different disciplines, handouts, slides, and example datasets

    Register for upcoming workshops

    Dates Location
    Thursday, November 26, 2020 - 10:00am to 12:00pm via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

    English as an Additional Language (EAL) workshops

    Academic Writing for Graduate Students

    This seminar-style workshop series is designed for multilingual graduate students with English as a non-dominant language. Workshop activities include richly varied writing, reading, and language-specific tasks designed to develop academic writers. Participants will learn how to apply their analytical skills to the discourses of their chosen disciplines and explore how effective academic writing in Western scholarly tradition is achieved.

    Required textbook:
    Swales, John M., & Feak, Christine B. (2011). Academic Writing for Graduate Students: Essential Tasks and Skills (3rd Edition). Ann Arbor: U of Michigan Press (ISBN: 978-0472-03475-8). (PDF Available)

    Register for upcoming workshops

    Dates Location
    Tuesday, September 15, 2020 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Tuesday, September 22, 2020 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Tuesday, September 29, 2020 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Tuesday, October 6, 2020 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Tuesday, October 13, 2020 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Tuesday, October 20, 2020 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Tuesday, October 27, 2020 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Tuesday, November 3, 2020 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Tuesday, November 10, 2020 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Tuesday, November 17, 2020 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Tuesday, November 24, 2020 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Tuesday, December 1, 2020 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Webinar

    Grammar Choices for Graduate and Professional Writers

    This seminar style workshop is designed for multilingual graduate students with English as a non-dominant language. Grammar is presented through a functional description of the language resources that can be used to create meaning clearly, communicate with the reader appropriately, and organize a message effectively.

    Required textbook:
    Grammar Choices for Graduate and Professional Writers (2nd edition) by Nigel A. Caplan University of Michigan Press, 2019. An e-book is available from Amazon. 

    Register for upcoming workshops

    Dates Location
    Thursday, September 17, 2020 - 2:30pm to 4:20pm
    Thursday, September 24, 2020 - 2:30pm to 4:20pm
    Thursday, October 1, 2020 - 2:30pm to 4:20pm
    Thursday, October 8, 2020 - 2:30pm to 4:20pm
    Thursday, October 15, 2020 - 2:30pm to 4:20pm
    Thursday, October 22, 2020 - 2:30pm to 4:20pm
    Thursday, October 29, 2020 - 2:30pm to 4:20pm
    Thursday, November 5, 2020 - 2:30pm to 4:20pm
    Thursday, November 12, 2020 - 2:30pm to 4:20pm
    Thursday, November 19, 2020 - 2:30pm to 4:20pm
    Thursday, November 26, 2020 - 2:30pm to 4:20pm
    Webinar

    Learning workshops

    Next semester's workshops will be posted soon.

    Research Data Management workshops

    For assistance with research data management, including help with SFU's Research Data Repository Radar, please contact data-services@sfu.ca.

    Introduction to Git and Version Control [Online]

     
    Note: This is a multi-day workshop. In order to attend the 2nd day, you are required to attend the 1st day.
     
    ------------------
     
    In this beginner's introduction to Git you will learn the basics of working with Git version control. We will start with an overview of Git and version controlling concepts. Making our own repository, we will practice creating a remote repository, cloning, branching and resolving conflicts on a Git project.
     
    Requirements:
    • You need to have Git bash installed on your computer. We will not be using GitHub, so no need for a GitHub account.
    • You need a remote secure shell (SSH) client installed:
      • If you are on a Mac or Linux laptop, you already have it installed.
      • If you are on Windows and don't have SSH installed (or don't know what it is), we recommend you install Ubuntu on your windows OS before the workshop. We will guide you through installing SSH before the class. 
    • We assume no previous knowledge of the Linux command line or version control.

    Register for upcoming workshops

    Dates Location
    Wednesday, November 25, 2020 - 1:30pm to 3:30pm
    Thursday, November 26, 2020 - 1:30pm to 3:30pm
    via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

    Research Programming 

    Introduction to R [Online]

    This series of lessons will introduce you to the programming language R.  R is an open-source, widely used, and increasingly popular tool for statistical and data analyses, text mining, geospatial analysis, modelling, and a growing number of other applications. No prior knowledge is required. Students will learn the skills needed to start analyzing their own data.

    The topics covered include:

    • the R environment (directories, workspace, scripts, and packages),
    • simple commands to get you started,
    • data structures (vector, matrix, data frames, lists),
    • basic data analysis tools (built-in statistical packages, plotting, etc.)

     As time permits, an introduction to functions may also be covered.

    Requirements:

    • Participants need to install the latest versions of R and RStudio prior to attending the workshop.

    Register for upcoming workshops

    Dates Location
    Monday, October 26, 2020 - 3:00pm to 5:00pm
    Tuesday, October 27, 2020 - 3:00pm to 5:00pm
    Wednesday, October 28, 2020 - 3:00pm to 5:00pm
    Thursday, October 29, 2020 - 3:00pm to 5:00pm
    Friday, October 30, 2020 - 3:00pm to 5:00pm
    via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

    Data Wrangling and Preprocessing With R [Online]

    This workshop for intermediate R users will show you how to leverage dplyr (a package in tidyverse) to more effectively filter, transform, and aggregate your data. If you've used R before, then you know that getting base R to transform data into a form needed for your analysis is usually a challenge, with complex blocks of code to perform what should be simple operations. Luckily for us, dplyr is designed to help easily express these operations so that what is essentially a simple data transformation only requires simple code.
     
    This workshop assumes that you are already comfortable in base R. For example, you should be able to: 
    • Import data from a CSV or text file 
    • Extract and create columns in a data frame, and filter rows according to different conditions 
    • Write an R script that can run on its own without manual user intervention.

    By the end of the workshop you will be able to: 

    • Use the primary dplyr functions for selecting, mutating, filtering, summarizing, and re-ordering data 
    • Recognize existing complicated base R code blocks and simplify them down using dplyr 
    • Use tidyr (a tidyverse package) to easily reshape data both to and from long and wide formats. 

    Register for upcoming workshops

    Dates Location
    Wednesday, November 4, 2020 - 3:00pm to 5:00pm
    Thursday, November 5, 2020 - 3:00pm to 5:00pm
    via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

    Minimal Computing, or When Wordpress No Longer Sparks Joy [Online]

    This workshop introduces participants to the various ideas and practices clustered under the term “minimal computing.” Defined by the Global Outlook::Digital Humanities group as “computing done under some set of significant constraints,” minimal computing offers a set of techniques for creating low-maintenance digital resources that are not only inexpensive (both in terms of material resources and technical debt), but are also sustainable and archivable (https://go-dh.github.io/mincomp/about/).

    This 90-minute workshop will begin with a broad overview of the recent surge in academic interest surrounding minimal computing, particularly in the context of the GLAM sector (galleries, libraries, archives, and museums), and will introduce participants to some of the reigning technologies available for creating minimal computing resources. Specifically, the workshop will show participants how to publish their own blog, research website, digital edition, or critical exhibit for free using Github and the static website generator, Jekyll.

    Prerequisites: No technical experience necessary, but previous participation in the Github Workshop is encouraged.

    Register for upcoming workshops

    Dates Location
    Tuesday, November 17, 2020 - 11:00am to 12:30pm via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

    Research Software workshops

    Citation Management

    Cite your sources easier and faster with Zotero [Online]

    Want to make your research and writing more efficient? Hate the last minute rush of trying to create a correctly formatted bibliography? This workshop is for you! We will introduce Zotero, a citation management tool that can help you import, organize, share, and manage your citations and documents, as well as create correctly formatted in-text citations and bibliographies in almost any style -- in seconds.

    Note: In advance of the workshop, participants should: register for a Zotero account and download and install Zotero 5.0.

    Register for upcoming workshops

    Dates Location
    Thursday, November 5, 2020 - 11:00am to 12:00pm via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

    Cite your sources easier and faster with Mendeley [Online]

    Want to make your research and writing more efficient? Hate the last minute rush of trying to create a correctly formatted bibliography? This workshop is for you! We will introduce Mendeley, a citation management tool that can help you import, organize, share, and manage your citations and documents, as well as create correctly formatted in-text citations and bibliographies in almost any style -- in seconds.

    Note: In advance of the workshop, participants should:

    Register for upcoming workshops

    Dates Location
    Friday, November 6, 2020 - 10:00am to 11:00am via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

    GIS

    Intro to Web Mapping [Online]

    This workshop is part of the Web Mapping Workshop Series.

    You’ve likely used Google Maps, Yelp, or Craigslist, which all have integrated web map elements, but have you ever thought of creating a web map for your research project? An interactive web map is a great tool for both data exploration and communicating your research with a wide audience, academic and public alike. This Web Mapping workshop series of 2 workshops will help researchers across disciplines understand what a web map is and how to create one in two different ways, namely ArcGIS online and R.  The first workshop (Intro to Web Mapping) is not the prerequisite for the second one (Web Mapping with R ) - feel free to attend one or both.

    --------------

    The workshop will begin with a basic overview of technologies, principles, and terminology related to web mapping, such as map tiles and web services. The remainder of the workshop will be devoted to hands-on time with ArcGIS Online.

    Software
    ArcGIS Online. You do not need to install any software but need to send email to gis-software@sfu.ca to request an ArcGIS online account if you wish to participate the hands-on part.

    Register for upcoming workshops

    Dates Location
    Friday, November 13, 2020 - 9:00am to 11:00am via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

    Introduction to the Spatial Elements of Textual Analysis [Online]

    Many humanities researchers have some form of geographical information included in their research, such as objects, images, or texts from or about a particular place; narratives about a person’s movement or a place’s change over time; or information about networks of people or organizations. Whether places and spaces are at the heart of your research or are a part of it, mapping can help answer research questions and generate new ones by visualizing your data in new ways. It can help tell a story about place or space. 

    This workshop will cover the nuts and bolts of getting started mapping with ArcGIS. We will discuss how to extract data from your research, get it ready for analysis, and upload it into ArcGIS. The workshop will help humanities researchers explore and map the spatial elements of their research with ArcGIS.

    By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

    • extract data from their research;
    • get their data ready for spatial analysis;
    • upload data into ArcGIS Online;
    • use some basic mapping techniques with ArcGIS Online.

    Software: ArcGIS Online. You do not need to install any software. However, if you wish to participate during the hands-on portion, please send an email to gis-software@sfu.ca at least one day ahead of workshop date to request an ArcGIS online account.

    Workshop page (SFU Canvas): GIS workshops page includes workshop descriptions and suggested streams for different disciplines, handouts, slides, and example datasets.

    Register for upcoming workshops

    Dates Location
    Thursday, November 19, 2020 - 10:00am to 12:00pm via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

    Web Mapping with R [Online]

    This workshop is part of the Web Mapping Workshop Series.

    You’ve likely used Google Maps, Yelp, or Craigslist, which all have integrated web map elements, but have you ever thought of creating a web map for your research project? An interactive web map is a great tool for both data exploration and communicating your research with a wide audience, academic and public alike. This Web Mapping workshop series of 2 workshops will help researchers across disciplines understand what a web map is and how to create one in two different ways, namely ArcGIS online and R.  The first workshop (Intro to Web Mapping) is not the prerequisite for the second one (Web Mapping with R ) - feel free to attend one or both

    --------------

    Leaflet is one of the most popular open-source JavaScript libraries for interactive maps. Here’s an example of a web map created with Leaflet from The New York Times. This workshop will introduce you to Leaflet for R, an R package, which makes it easy to integrate and control Leaflet maps in R without knowledge of JavaScript. You can create interactive web maps right in R Studio! The topics covered include:

     

    • Using the Leaflet package for R to add titles, markers, popups, create a theme map, change basemap, etc.
    • Host and publish your web map through Github

    Requirements:

    Familiarity with R and the RStudio environment. 

    Software

    Participants need to install the latest versions of R and RStudio prior to attending the workshop.

    Register for upcoming workshops

    Dates Location
    Friday, November 20, 2020 - 9:00am to 11:00am via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

    Introduction to Spatial Data in Humanities: Creating Story Maps [Online]

    Many humanities researchers have some form of geographical information included in their research, such as objects, images, or texts from or about a particular place; narratives about a person’s movement or a place’s change over time; or information about networks of people or organizations. Whether places and spaces are at the heart of your research or are a part of it, mapping can help answer research questions and generate new ones by visualizing your data in new ways. It can help tell a story about place or space. 

    This workshop will cover spatial analysis - the potential applications of your geographic information. We will demonstrate the analytic functions included in ArcGIS and discuss how to create context for your spatial data. We will also introduce Story Maps, an app that helps turn place-based information into narratives with a combination of maps, images, and text. Note: for this workshop, we will assume that you have already attended the first workshop or are comfortable with the material covered there.

    By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

    • create a Story Map;
    • extract spatial context from text.

    Software: ArcGIS Online. You do not need to install any software. However, if you wish to participate during the hands-on portion, please send an email to gis-software@sfu.ca at least one day before the workshop date to request an ArcGIS online account.

    Workshop page (SFU Canvas): GIS workshops page includes workshop descriptions and suggested streams for different disciplines, handouts, slides, and example datasets

      Register for upcoming workshops

      Dates Location
      Thursday, November 26, 2020 - 10:00am to 12:00pm via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)
      Note: UBC welcomes SFU students to participate in their online GIS workshops this summer (2020). There are 6 GIS workshops starting from July 23, 2020 to Aug 14, 2020. Use this link to browse and register for these workshops (no UBC credential is required).

      Python

      Next semester's workshops will be posted soon.

      Qualitative Data Analysis

      Making Literature Reviews Easier with NVivo for Windows [Online]

      This interactive workshop introduces importing and coding of literature review materials and key tools that can be particularly helpful when reviewing literature in your area of research.

      Topics covered include:

      • introducing NVivo and setting up a project
      • working with your information
      • identifying themes, topics and ideas and collecting data to support them
      • using tools such as text search query, matrix coding query, and Framework Matrix.

      What will you achieve from this session? You will have the knowledge to set up a literature review in NVivo, and begin to work with your information. You will also be able to use NVivo to organize your content and begin to identify themes, topics or ideas. It is appropriate for those who have had some experience with NVivo. For more information about NVivo at SFU, please visit NVivo Software for Research Analysis.

      Notes:

      • Before the workshop, participants should download and install the latest version of NVivo. You can download NVivo and the license key with your SFU computing ID by using the self-serve download link here. If you are unable to get past the authentication page, then please email nvivo-rc@sfu.ca.
      • Participants should also have some familiarity with citation management software (Zotero, Mendeley, Refworks, EndNote, etc). Zotero will be used during this workshop.

      Register for upcoming workshops

      Dates Location
      Tuesday, October 27, 2020 - 12:00pm to 2:00pm via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

      Making Literature Reviews Easier with NVivo for Mac [Online]

      This interactive workshop introduces importing and coding of literature review materials and key tools that can be particularly helpful when reviewing literature in your area of research.

      Topics covered include:

      • introducing NVivo and setting up a project
      • working with your information
      • identifying themes, topics and ideas and collecting data to support them
      • using tools such as text search query, matrix coding query, and Framework Matrix.

      What will you achieve from this session? You will have the knowledge to set up a literature review in NVivo, and begin to work with your information. You will also be able to use NVivo to organize your content and begin to identify themes, topics or ideas. It is appropriate for those who have had some experience with NVivo. For more information about NVivo at SFU, please visit NVivo Software for Research Analysis.

      Notes:

      • Before the workshop, participants should download and install the latest version of NVivo. You can download NVivo and the license key with your SFU computing ID by using the self-serve download link here. If you are unable to get past the authentication page, then please email nvivo-rc@sfu.ca.
      • Participants should also have some familiarity with citation management software (Zotero, Mendeley, Refworks, EndNote, etc). Zotero will be used during this workshop.

      Register for upcoming workshops

      Dates Location
      Wednesday, November 4, 2020 - 12:00pm to 2:00pm via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

      Doing More with NVivo for Windows [Online]

      Need help taking the next step with NVivo? If you’re already comfortable with bringing in documents and coding them, you’re ready to move on to analyzing your material. In this hands-on workshop, Graduate Peer NVivo Facilitators will walk you through visualizations and queries using sample data.

      This workshop will build on the concepts from the "Introduction to NVivo" workshop, and depending on the interest of the group may include:
      classifying and categorizing data
      • grouping your data: collections and links
      • exploring your data (coding based queries)
      • models and relationships
      • visualizing your data
      • reporting and presenting your findings
       Requirements:
      • This workshop assumes that you already have some familiarity with NVivo and/or will have taken the "Introduction to NVivo" workshop.
      • Before the workshop, participants should download and install the latest version of NVivo. You can download NVivo and the license key with your SFU computing ID by using the self-serve download link here. If you are unable to get past the authentication page, then please email nvivo-rc@sfu.ca.
      • We will be using the Windows (PC) operating system and the interface is very different from the Mac operating system

      Register for upcoming workshops

      Dates Location
      Thursday, November 12, 2020 - 10:00am to 12:00pm via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

      Doing More with NVivo for Mac [Online]

      Need help taking the next step with NVivo? If you’re already comfortable with bringing in documents and coding them, you’re ready to move on to analyzing your material. In this hands-on workshop, Graduate Peer NVivo Facilitators will walk you through visualizations and queries using sample data.

      This workshop will build on the concepts from the "Introduction to NVivo" workshop, and depending on the interest of the group may include:
      classifying and categorizing data
      • grouping your data: collections and links
      • exploring your data (coding based queries)
      • models and relationships
      • visualizing your data
      • reporting and presenting your findings
       Requirements:
      • This workshop assumes that you already have some familiarity with NVivo and/or will have taken the "Introduction to NVivo" workshop.
      • Before the workshop, participants should download and install the latest version of NVivo. You can download NVivo and the license key with your SFU computing ID by using the self-serve download link here. If you are unable to get past the authentication page, then please email nvivo-rc@sfu.ca.
      • We will be using the MAC operating system and the interface is very different from the Windows (PC) operating system

      Register for upcoming workshops

      Dates Location
      Wednesday, November 18, 2020 - 10:00am to 12:00pm via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

      R (Software)

      Due to current restrictions our consultations in R will all be done remotely (e.g., Skype, Zoom, email, etc.) until further notice. To set up a consultation appointment, please email us at data-services@sfu.ca with some details on your questions about using R. 

      Data anonymization: note that any data needs to be suitably anonymized if working with sensitive subjects before meeting with the Research Programming Peer. 

      Introduction to R [Online]

      This series of lessons will introduce you to the programming language R.  R is an open-source, widely used, and increasingly popular tool for statistical and data analyses, text mining, geospatial analysis, modelling, and a growing number of other applications. No prior knowledge is required. Students will learn the skills needed to start analyzing their own data.

      The topics covered include:

      • the R environment (directories, workspace, scripts, and packages),
      • simple commands to get you started,
      • data structures (vector, matrix, data frames, lists),
      • basic data analysis tools (built-in statistical packages, plotting, etc.)

       As time permits, an introduction to functions may also be covered.

      Requirements:

      • Participants need to install the latest versions of R and RStudio prior to attending the workshop.

      Register for upcoming workshops

      Dates Location
      Monday, October 26, 2020 - 3:00pm to 5:00pm
      Tuesday, October 27, 2020 - 3:00pm to 5:00pm
      Wednesday, October 28, 2020 - 3:00pm to 5:00pm
      Thursday, October 29, 2020 - 3:00pm to 5:00pm
      Friday, October 30, 2020 - 3:00pm to 5:00pm
      via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

      Data Wrangling and Preprocessing With R [Online]

      This workshop for intermediate R users will show you how to leverage dplyr (a package in tidyverse) to more effectively filter, transform, and aggregate your data. If you've used R before, then you know that getting base R to transform data into a form needed for your analysis is usually a challenge, with complex blocks of code to perform what should be simple operations. Luckily for us, dplyr is designed to help easily express these operations so that what is essentially a simple data transformation only requires simple code.
       
      This workshop assumes that you are already comfortable in base R. For example, you should be able to: 
      • Import data from a CSV or text file 
      • Extract and create columns in a data frame, and filter rows according to different conditions 
      • Write an R script that can run on its own without manual user intervention.

      By the end of the workshop you will be able to: 

      • Use the primary dplyr functions for selecting, mutating, filtering, summarizing, and re-ordering data 
      • Recognize existing complicated base R code blocks and simplify them down using dplyr 
      • Use tidyr (a tidyverse package) to easily reshape data both to and from long and wide formats. 

      Register for upcoming workshops

      Dates Location
      Wednesday, November 4, 2020 - 3:00pm to 5:00pm
      Thursday, November 5, 2020 - 3:00pm to 5:00pm
      via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

      Web Scraping in R [Online]

      A growing amount of data is available over the web. However, this data is usually presented in an unstructured HTML format which poses a challenge to researchers who want to automatically capture the data and convert it into a form appropriate for analysis. Web scraping is a computational method that offers means to meet such challenges. In this workshop you will learn how to scrape unstructured web pages using rvest R package and prepare the captured data for analysis. You will gain some hands-on experience working on a few small projects that underlie common scraping strategies/issues. The last project will include scraping of multiple web pages.

      Requirements 

      • Functional knowledge of commonly used base R commands (for an overview see https://www.rstudio.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/base-r.pdf)
      • Participants will need to have R and RStudio installed on their device prior to attending the workshop

      Register for upcoming workshops

      Dates Location
      Monday, November 16, 2020 - 3:00pm to 5:00pm
      Tuesday, November 17, 2020 - 3:00pm to 5:00pm
      Wednesday, November 18, 2020 - 3:00pm to 5:00pm
      Thursday, November 19, 2020 - 3:00pm to 5:00pm
      via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

      Web Mapping with R [Online]

      This workshop is part of the Web Mapping Workshop Series.

      You’ve likely used Google Maps, Yelp, or Craigslist, which all have integrated web map elements, but have you ever thought of creating a web map for your research project? An interactive web map is a great tool for both data exploration and communicating your research with a wide audience, academic and public alike. This Web Mapping workshop series of 2 workshops will help researchers across disciplines understand what a web map is and how to create one in two different ways, namely ArcGIS online and R.  The first workshop (Intro to Web Mapping) is not the prerequisite for the second one (Web Mapping with R ) - feel free to attend one or both

      --------------

      Leaflet is one of the most popular open-source JavaScript libraries for interactive maps. Here’s an example of a web map created with Leaflet from The New York Times. This workshop will introduce you to Leaflet for R, an R package, which makes it easy to integrate and control Leaflet maps in R without knowledge of JavaScript. You can create interactive web maps right in R Studio! The topics covered include:

       

      • Using the Leaflet package for R to add titles, markers, popups, create a theme map, change basemap, etc.
      • Host and publish your web map through Github

      Requirements:

      Familiarity with R and the RStudio environment. 

      Software

      Participants need to install the latest versions of R and RStudio prior to attending the workshop.

      Register for upcoming workshops

      Dates Location
      Friday, November 20, 2020 - 9:00am to 11:00am via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

      Statistics

      Next semester's workshops will be posted soon.

      Visual Analytics

      Get Started with Tableau Public for Data Visualization [Online]

      Tableau is a data visualization tool that is being used to help analyze data and illustrate the patterns and insights behind them. This online, interactive workshop will introduce researchers and students to Tableau Public, a free access version of Tableau.

      You will leave this workshop with an understanding of how to:

      • connect datasets to your Tableau workbook;
      • create a variety of basic chart types (including bar charts, line graphs, and maps);
      • publish and share interactive charts and graphs.
      Requirements:
      • No prior experience with Tableau is necessary.
      • Before the workshop, please download and install the latest version of Tableau Public to your laptop.

      Register for upcoming workshops

      Dates Location
      Thursday, October 22, 2020 - 10:00am to 12:00pm via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

      Scholarly Communication workshops

      Preparing to Publish [Online]

      Graduate students are always encouraged to publish but often without really knowing what that means or how to start. This workshop will focus on navigating the peer review process and will also touch on the topics of open access, working with an editor, and co-authorship.  It will include a discussion of copyright transfer agreements and licenses and provide insight into publishing venues for assuring your research has the best possible visibility, accessibility, and impact.

      A few questions this session will help to answer:

      • How does the publishing cycle work?
      • How can you assess potential publishing venues?
      • What is peer review and how can you respond to reviewer comments?
      • What rights can you retain to your published research?
      • What are predatory publishers and how can you avoid them?

      Register for upcoming workshops

      Dates Location
      Friday, October 23, 2020 - 9:30am to 11:30am via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

      Knowledge Mobilization workshops

      Unlock your research impact: Blogging your research [Online]

      Curious about research blogging, but not sure where to start? Join writer and science communication researcher Alice Fleerackers to learn tips and tricks for communicating your work to online audiences.

      Presenter:

      • Alice Fleerackers

      Register for upcoming workshops

      Dates Location
      Wednesday, October 21, 2020 - 12:30pm to 1:15pm via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

      Unlock your research impact: Podcasting your research [Online]

      Interested in starting your own podcast, but not sure how? Join podcaster Assistant Professor of Publishing Hannah McGregor (Secret Feminist Agenda, The SpokenWeb Podcast) to learn about the different styles of academic podcasts, the technological challenges of creating good audio, and the pleasures (and perils!) of building a public audience for your research.

      Presenter:

      • Hannah McGregor

      Register for upcoming workshops

      Dates Location
      Tuesday, November 3, 2020 - 12:30pm to 1:15pm via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

      Research impact evaluation 101 [Online]

      Evaluations often inform decision-making. Evaluating your research impact can inform funders’, promotion committees’, and your community partners’ decisions about supporting your research. Research impact reaches well beyond journal impact factors, it includes all your research activities and outputs to engage or inform your community. Knowledge gained from evaluation can also help you to optimize the efficient use of resources invested in knowledge mobilization activities and thereby reduce waste. In this two hour, interactive workshop facilitated by experts in evaluation and knowledge mobilization you will be introduced to evaluating the impact of your knowledge mobilization efforts (engagement, communication, dissemination, etc.). Participants will leave with a preliminary draft of their logic model and evaluation plan with feedback and support from facilitators.

      This two hour interactive workshop is facilitated by Susan Chunick and Lupin Battersby, experts in evaluation and knowledge mobilization. They will introduce you to evaluating the impact of your knowledge mobilization efforts (engagement, communication, dissemination, etc.) and guide you through drafting a logic model and evaluation plan.

      Learning objectives:

      1. Understand the basics of evaluation (terminology, types, cycle)
      2. Understand what a logic model is and why it is useful
      3. Able to formulate evaluation questions
      4. Understand how to draft a logic model and evaluation plan

      Register for upcoming workshops

      Dates Location
      Thursday, November 19, 2020 - 9:30am to 11:30am via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

      Unlock your research impact: Influencing Policy [Online]

      How can your research inform policy? Zafar Adeel, Professor of Professional Practice in Resource and Environmental Management will introduce you to strategies for engaging and communicating with policy makers.

      Presenter:

      • Zafar Adeel

      Register for upcoming workshops

      Dates Location
      Thursday, December 3, 2020 - 12:30pm to 1:15pm via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

      Writing workshops

      Please register for the following writing workshops:

      Grammar Choices for Graduate and Professional Writers

      This seminar style workshop is designed for multilingual graduate students with English as a non-dominant language. Grammar is presented through a functional description of the language resources that can be used to create meaning clearly, communicate with the reader appropriately, and organize a message effectively.

      Required textbook:
      Grammar Choices for Graduate and Professional Writers (2nd edition) by Nigel A. Caplan University of Michigan Press, 2019. An e-book is available from Amazon. 

      Register for upcoming workshops

      Dates Location
      Thursday, September 17, 2020 - 2:30pm to 4:20pm
      Thursday, September 24, 2020 - 2:30pm to 4:20pm
      Thursday, October 1, 2020 - 2:30pm to 4:20pm
      Thursday, October 8, 2020 - 2:30pm to 4:20pm
      Thursday, October 15, 2020 - 2:30pm to 4:20pm
      Thursday, October 22, 2020 - 2:30pm to 4:20pm
      Thursday, October 29, 2020 - 2:30pm to 4:20pm
      Thursday, November 5, 2020 - 2:30pm to 4:20pm
      Thursday, November 12, 2020 - 2:30pm to 4:20pm
      Thursday, November 19, 2020 - 2:30pm to 4:20pm
      Thursday, November 26, 2020 - 2:30pm to 4:20pm
      Webinar

      Thesis Writing Group [Online]

      Description: Join the Thesis Writing Group to make some serious progress on your thesis! The Thesis Writing Group is modeled after other successful online writing groups that use scheduled time to work on their writing with the (quiet) presence and support of other writers. The Research Commons remains devoted to supporting SFU graduate student researchers, even though we are now working from a distance!

      What you can expect

      The Thesis Writing Group will be held via Zoom. It will be hosted and moderated by members of the Graduate Writing Facilitator team, who will be available for writing support, along with a Librarian for research support. An Assistant for Theses will also be available for some of the sessions for any questions about using the thesis template, formatting, or the thesis submission process. The sessions will be held on Fridays, 9:00 am – 12 noon for 8 weeks, starting October 16th, 2020 and concluding December 4th, 2020.

      The online writing group format

      Some of you may already be familiar with or have participated in online writing groups. For both those with and without experience, we encourage you to join us for this unique experience! Like Thesis Boot Camp that some of you may be familiar with, the group will begin each session by briefly checking in and setting goals in small groups before turning to dedicated writing time. Participants can request support from our team through the chat feature, and consultations/discussions will take place in a breakout room. The 3-hour sessions will conclude with the group coming together and discussing any reflections or areas of interest/concern.

      Writers will be asked to keep their microphones muted while writing, and the use of webcams is welcome but entirely optional for each participant. 

      Registration

      Registration is available for all 8-weeks of sessions combined. We ask that registered participants commit to attending each session to the extent that their schedules allow, and that those who would like to join but know in advance that they will not be available to attend one or several sessions to please let us know in advance. Similar to Thesis Boot Camp registration, this is to ensure that we offer ample resources to best support students dedicated to making serious progress on their theses during this time period.

      Please register by Tuesday, October 13th at 4:00pm, after which registrants will be contacted with a confirmation and further instructions.

      If you have any questions about the Thesis Writing Group, please contact Robyn Long, Writing Services Coordinator for graduate students, at robyn_long@sfu.ca.

      Register for upcoming workshops

      Dates Location
      Friday, October 16, 2020 - 9:00am to 12:00pm
      Friday, October 23, 2020 - 9:00am to 12:00pm
      Friday, October 30, 2020 - 9:00am to 12:00pm
      Friday, November 6, 2020 - 9:00am to 12:00pm
      Friday, November 13, 2020 - 9:00am to 12:00pm
      Friday, November 20, 2020 - 9:00am to 12:00pm
      Friday, November 27, 2020 - 9:00am to 12:00pm
      Friday, December 4, 2020 - 9:00am to 12:00pm
      via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

      Preparing to Publish [Online]

      Graduate students are always encouraged to publish but often without really knowing what that means or how to start. This workshop will focus on navigating the peer review process and will also touch on the topics of open access, working with an editor, and co-authorship.  It will include a discussion of copyright transfer agreements and licenses and provide insight into publishing venues for assuring your research has the best possible visibility, accessibility, and impact.

      A few questions this session will help to answer:

      • How does the publishing cycle work?
      • How can you assess potential publishing venues?
      • What is peer review and how can you respond to reviewer comments?
      • What rights can you retain to your published research?
      • What are predatory publishers and how can you avoid them?

      Register for upcoming workshops

      Dates Location
      Friday, October 23, 2020 - 9:30am to 11:30am via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

      Write More Concisely [Online]

      Get to the point. Say more in fewer words. Attend this workshop to learn key strategies to revise your writing specifically for concision. Most are surprised to learn how drastically these strategies can reduce one’s word count without having to eliminate content!

      Register for upcoming workshops

      Dates Location
      Monday, October 26, 2020 - 11:00am to 12:00pm via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

      Writing for the Public (for Staff)

      Join SFU Library's Writer in Residence, Mark Winston, for a full-day, hands-on workshop on writing for public audiences.

      Have you thought about raising your profile by publishing opinion pieces in major newspapers and magazines, blog posts, or even a trade book, focused on a broad, non-academic audience? Interested in expanding your influence by effectively communicating your research and other activities to wider audiences?

      Workshop participants will have the opportunity to communicate their own work through effective, compelling and engaging writing. We’ll work on developing brevity, clarity and impact, gaining confidence and skill in using your unique voice and style to tell your story with greater proficiency.

      This all-day workshop will be limited to eight participants, who will work on their own distinctive, potentially publishable projects. Format will be hands-on and participatory, focused on clear thinking, succinctness, simplicity, storytelling and bringing key messages front and center, using intensive group feedback, editing and revisions. We’ll also discuss audiences, outlets and the nuts and bolts of publishing a non-academic piece. Participants will leave the workshop with a draft of at least part of a piece suitable for submission.

      This workshop will alternate between online sessions focused on nonfiction writing strategies, offline writing exercises, online feedback and editing, and offline breaks.

      Learn more about Mark Winston and the SFU Library Non-Fiction Writer in Residence Program.

      Register for upcoming workshops

      Dates Location
      Friday, October 30, 2020 - 9:30am to 4:00pm via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

      Using “Free Writing” to Generate Quality Text [Online]

      You might already be aware of “free writing” as an exercise that can aid the drafting process, but does this task ever seem too free to help you produce quality text that you can use in academic writing? Join this workshop to practice some helpful guidelines for free writing. We’ll provide just enough structure so that your “free” writing doesn’t instead simply feel “lost.”

      Register for upcoming workshops

      Dates Location
      Wednesday, November 4, 2020 - 11:00am to 12:00pm via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

      Writing for the Public (for Graduate Students)

      Join SFU Library's Writer in Residence, Mark Winston, for a full-day, hands-on workshop on writing for public audiences.

      Have you thought about raising your profile by publishing opinion pieces in major newspapers and magazines, blog posts, or even a trade book, focused on a broad, non-academic audience? Interested in expanding your influence by effectively communicating your research and other activities to wider audiences?

      Workshop participants will have the opportunity to communicate their own work through effective, compelling and engaging writing. We’ll work on developing brevity, clarity and impact, gaining confidence and skill in using your unique voice and style to tell your story with greater proficiency.

      This all-day workshop will be limited to eight participants, who will work on their own distinctive, potentially publishable projects. Format will be hands-on and participatory, focused on clear thinking, succinctness, simplicity, storytelling and bringing key messages front and center, using intensive group feedback, editing and revisions. We’ll also discuss audiences, outlets and the nuts and bolts of publishing a non-academic piece. Participants will leave the workshop with a draft of at least part of a piece suitable for submission.

      This workshop will alternate between online sessions focused on nonfiction writing strategies, offline writing exercises, online feedback and editing, and offline breaks.

      Learn more about Mark Winston and the SFU Library Non-Fiction Writer in Residence Program.

      Register for upcoming workshops

      Dates Location
      Thursday, November 12, 2020 - 9:30am to 4:00pm via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

      Creating Flow and Cohesion [Online]

      Have you ever received feedback that your writing seems “choppy”? Are you having concerns about how to order your ideas or how to transition from one section to the next? This workshop is focused on developing some strategies for producing cohesive academic writing that “flows.”

      Register for upcoming workshops

      Dates Location
      Monday, November 16, 2020 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

      Paraphrasing with Purpose and Integrity [Online]

      Learning how to skillfully use our own words to accurately describe other scholars’ ideas remains a challenging process for many graduate students, and understandably so. While practicing and improving paraphrasing is guaranteed to level-up your writing, doing so with integrity can and should be an ongoing concern. Come to this workshop to learn more about that foreboding beast "plagiarism," and its lesser known version "patch writing," so that you are better equipped to avoid it in your own work.

      Register for upcoming workshops

      Dates Location
      Wednesday, November 25, 2020 - 11:00am to 12:00pm via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

      Writing for the Public (for Faculty)

      Join SFU Library's Writer in Residence, Mark Winston, for a full-day, hands-on workshop on writing for public audiences.

      Have you thought about raising your profile by publishing opinion pieces in major newspapers and magazines, blog posts, or even a trade book, focused on a broad, non-academic audience? Interested in expanding your influence by effectively communicating your research and other activities to wider audiences?

      Workshop participants will have the opportunity to communicate their own work through effective, compelling and engaging writing. We’ll work on developing brevity, clarity and impact, gaining confidence and skill in using your unique voice and style to tell your story with greater proficiency.

      This all-day workshop will be limited to eight participants, who will work on their own distinctive, potentially publishable projects. Format will be hands-on and participatory, focused on clear thinking, succinctness, simplicity, storytelling and bringing key messages front and center, using intensive group feedback, editing and revisions. We’ll also discuss audiences, outlets and the nuts and bolts of publishing a non-academic piece. Participants will leave the workshop with a draft of at least part of a piece suitable for submission.

      This workshop will alternate between online sessions focused on nonfiction writing strategies, offline writing exercises, online feedback and editing, and offline breaks.

      Learn more about Mark Winston and the SFU Library Non-Fiction Writer in Residence Program.

      Register for upcoming workshops

      Dates Location
      Thursday, November 26, 2020 - 9:30am to 4:00pm via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

      Thesis workshops 

      Thesis Word Template Q & A Session [Online]

      We invite you to attend this Q & A session once you have reviewed the following online video tutorials on using the thesis Word template:

      1. Getting started: Download and setup (2min 13s)
      2. Organization of the Thesis (3min 54s)
      3. Styles & Organization Template Styles (8min 33s)
      4. How to Use Styles: Basics (8min 56s)

      You may also want to review these additional online video tutorials prior to attending, but it is not required.

      Please bring any questions you have about using the thesis Word template. We can also use the screen sharing capability to guide you, provide clarification, examples and demonstrations.

       

      Register for upcoming workshops

      Dates Location
      Tuesday, October 20, 2020 - 10:00am to 11:00am via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)
      Thursday, November 19, 2020 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

      In the meantime, please check out our online tutorials on using the Thesis Word Template.