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Research Commons: Workshops for graduate students & postdoctoral fellows

The Research Commons is pleased to offer you a range of workshops. Register for upcoming workshops. Search by date in our workshops calendar.

If you do not see the topic(s) you are interested in and/or would like a specialized workshop for yourself and a group of colleagues, send a request to research-commons@sfu.ca.

SFU values diversity and is committed to inclusion. If you require any disability related accommodations in order to fully access and participate in our workshops and/or events, please contact us directly at library-workshops@sfu.ca. Please contact us as soon as possible as some accommodations will require lead time to arrange (i.e. CART, ASL)

Digital Humanities

 

Using NVivo for Humanities Research

Does your research involve a large number of texts, different media, or even different types of files? Do you find it difficult to find and visualize trends in your research? Do you want to be able to do this without learning how to code? Come learn how NVivo can help you perform large-scale qualitative analysis without having to learn how to code! NVivo is a software package available through the SFU Library that helps with the organization and analysis of unstructured data. In this two-hour workshop, we will walk through what kinds of research questions NVivo can help you answer, work together on a sample project, and begin exploring some of the possibilities NVivo represents for your own research.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Tuesday, October 30, 2018 - 1:30pm to 3:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Lab 4009

Introduction to Spatial Data in Humanities: The Spatial Elements of Textual Analysis

Many humanities researchers have some form of geographical information included in their research, such as objects, images, or texts from or about a particular place; narratives about a person’s movement or a place’s change over time; or information about networks of people or organizations. Whether places and spaces are at the heart of your research or are a part of it, mapping can help answer research questions and generate new ones by visualizing your data in new ways. It can help tell a story about place or space. This two-part workshop series will help humanities researchers map their place-based research with ArcGIS.

The Spatial Elements of Textual Analysis
The first workshop will cover the nuts and bolts of getting started mapping with ArcGIS. We will discuss how to extract data from your research, get it ready for analysis, and upload it into ArcGIS. The workshop will help humanities researchers explore and map the spatial elements of their research with ArcGIS.

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • extract data from their research;
  • get their data ready for spatial analysis;
  • upload data into ArcGIS Online;
  • use some basic mapping techniques with ArcGIS Online.

Software: ArcGIS Online (participants will not need their own computer)

Workshop page (SFU Canvas): GIS workshops page includes workshop descriptions and suggested streams for different disciplines, handouts, slides, and example datasets

Creating Story Maps
The second workshop will cover spatial analysis - the potential applications of your geographic information. We will demonstrate the analytic functions included in ArcGIS and discuss how to create context for your spatial data. We will also introduce Story Maps, an app that helps turn place-based information into narratives with a combination of maps, images, and text. Note: for this workshop, we will assume that you have already attended the first workshop or are comfortable with the material covered there.

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • create a Story Map;
  • extract spatial context from text.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Wednesday, November 7, 2018 - 3:30pm to 5:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Lab 2105

Introduction to Spatial Data in Humanities: Creating Story Maps

Many humanities researchers have some form of geographical information included in their research, such as objects, images, or texts from or about a particular place; narratives about a person’s movement or a place’s change over time; or information about networks of people or organizations. Whether places and spaces are at the heart of your research or are a part of it, mapping can help answer research questions and generate new ones by visualizing your data in new ways. It can help tell a story about place or space. This two-part workshop series will help humanities researchers map their place-based research with ArcGIS.

The Spatial Elements of Textual Analysis
The first workshop will cover the nuts and bolts of getting started mapping with ArcGIS. We will discuss how to extract data from your research, get it ready for analysis, and upload it into ArcGIS. The workshop will help humanities researchers explore and map the spatial elements of their research with ArcGIS.

Software: ArcGIS Online (participants will not need their own computer)

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • extract data from their research;
  • get their data ready for spatial analysis;
  • upload data into ArcGIS Online;
  • use some basic mapping techniques with ArcGIS Online.

Creating Story Maps
The second workshop will cover spatial analysis - the potential applications of your geographic information. We will demonstrate the analytic functions included in ArcGIS and discuss how to create context for your spatial data. We will also introduce Story Maps, an app that helps turn place-based information into narratives with a combination of maps, images, and text. Note: for this workshop, we will assume that you have already attended the first workshop or are comfortable with the material covered there.

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • create a Story Map;
  • extract spatial context from text.

Software: ArcGIS Online (participants will not need their own computer)

Workshop page (SFU Canvas): GIS workshops page includes workshop descriptions and suggested streams for different disciplines, handouts, slides, and example datasets

    Upcoming Workshops

    Dates Location
    Thursday, November 8, 2018 - 3:30pm to 5:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Lab 2105

    Introduction to Twitter bots with Tracery

    Using the Tracery story-grammar generation tool, participants will learn how to turn simple JSON lists into full-fledged Twitter bots like @Gastwon, (https://twitter.com/gastwon) @TaySEliot (https://twitter.com/tayseliot) or even @SoftLandscapes. (https://twitter.com/softlandscapes). No programming experience is necessary.

    Please bring a fully charged laptop.

     

    Upcoming Workshops

    Dates Location
    Thursday, November 22, 2018 - 1:00pm to 2:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

    EAL/ESL

    Academic English Grammar and Writing for Multilingual Learners

    Academic English Grammar and Writing for Multilingual Learners is a co-curricular course offered by the Student Learning Commons (SLC) and has been carefully designed to help you succeed as a multilingual learner of English. 

    The course combines grammar for academic purposes, critical thinking, and academic writing for university. The syllabus focuses on developing an appropriate academic voice to help you express yourself correctly and appropriately in academic writing as a member of the SFU academic community.  Students will do regular in-class writing, learn how to develop a critical stance, and write a research paper  and a give a presentation.

    The course is not formally graded, but you will complete several reading and writing tasks, all of which will be graded and used to provide personalized feedback. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.

    The required workbook is Grammar for Academic Purposes by Steve Marshall. Students have the option of purchasing the online version ($23.95) or the book ($32.95; on the first day of class I make an order for the number of students who would like a book and books will arrive in a few days).

    Fall 2018 Term

    September 19-November 30, 2018

    Wednesdays and Fridays, 10:30 AM-12:20 PM

    Library Room 7200

    Upcoming Workshops

    Dates Location
    Wednesday, September 19, 2018 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Friday, September 21, 2018 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Wednesday, September 26, 2018 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Friday, September 28, 2018 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Wednesday, October 3, 2018 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Friday, October 5, 2018 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Wednesday, October 10, 2018 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Friday, October 12, 2018 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Wednesday, October 17, 2018 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Friday, October 19, 2018 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Wednesday, October 24, 2018 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Friday, October 26, 2018 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Wednesday, October 31, 2018 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Friday, November 2, 2018 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Wednesday, November 7, 2018 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Friday, November 9, 2018 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Wednesday, November 14, 2018 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Friday, November 16, 2018 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Wednesday, November 21, 2018 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Friday, November 23, 2018 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Wednesday, November 28, 2018 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Friday, November 30, 2018 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7200

    Let's Talk!

    Let's Talk! is a weekly workshop that gives students for whom English is an additional language an opportunity outside of class to improve their English conversation skills, learn strategies for academic success, and have fun meeting people.

    Participants will develop their conversation and listening skills through a variety of topics, such as stereotypes, slang and idioms, social media, Canadian and global culture, presentation skills, pronunciation, and story-telling.

    Upcoming Workshops

    Dates Location
    Tuesday, September 18, 2018 - 1:30pm to 2:30pm
    Tuesday, September 25, 2018 - 1:30pm to 2:30pm
    Tuesday, October 2, 2018 - 1:30pm to 2:30pm
    Tuesday, October 9, 2018 - 1:30pm to 2:30pm
    Tuesday, October 16, 2018 - 1:30pm to 2:30pm
    Tuesday, October 23, 2018 - 1:30pm to 2:30pm
    Tuesday, October 30, 2018 - 1:30pm to 2:30pm
    Tuesday, November 6, 2018 - 1:30pm to 2:30pm
    Tuesday, November 13, 2018 - 1:30pm to 2:30pm
    Tuesday, November 20, 2018 - 1:30pm to 2:30pm
    Tuesday, November 27, 2018 - 1:30pm to 2:30pm
    Burnaby, West Mall Centre, CELLTR, Rm 1390
    Thursday, September 20, 2018 - 12:30pm to 1:30pm
    Thursday, September 27, 2018 - 12:30pm to 1:30pm
    Thursday, October 4, 2018 - 12:30pm to 1:30pm
    Thursday, October 11, 2018 - 12:30pm to 1:30pm
    Thursday, October 18, 2018 - 12:30pm to 1:30pm
    Thursday, October 25, 2018 - 12:30pm to 1:30pm
    Thursday, November 1, 2018 - 12:30pm to 1:30pm
    Thursday, November 8, 2018 - 12:30pm to 1:30pm
    Thursday, November 15, 2018 - 12:30pm to 1:30pm
    Thursday, November 22, 2018 - 12:30pm to 1:30pm
    Thursday, November 29, 2018 - 12:30pm to 1:30pm
    Burnaby, West Mall Centre, CELLTR, Rm 1390

    Pronunciation for Social, Academic, & Professional Settings

    This co-curricular short-term course provides the rules, learning strategies, and contextualized practice in the stress, rhythm, and melody of English words, phrases, and discourse. Students will also learn how a Canadian accent differs from American, British, and Australian varieties of English by analyzing popular TV shows.

    Upcoming Workshops

    Dates Location
    Thursday, September 20, 2018 - 4:30pm to 6:20pm
    Thursday, September 27, 2018 - 4:30pm to 6:20pm
    Thursday, October 4, 2018 - 4:30pm to 6:20pm
    Thursday, October 11, 2018 - 4:30pm to 6:20pm
    Thursday, October 18, 2018 - 4:30pm to 6:20pm
    Thursday, October 25, 2018 - 4:30pm to 6:20pm
    Harbour Centre, Rm 2280

    Learning

    Next semester's workshops will be posted soon.

    Research data management

    Introduction to Health Statistics

    This presentation covers health related statistics including:

    • CCHS- annual component and mental health,
    • Canadian Survey of Disability,
    • Aboriginal Peoples Survey,
    • vital statistics,
    • CHMS,
    • Canadian Cancer Registry,
    • General Social Survey- Caregiving & Care Receiving,
    • Census of Population.

    We will also talk about data dissemination (aggregate data and microdata/PUMF).

    Upcoming Workshops

    Dates Location
    Thursday, October 25, 2018 - 10:30am to 11:30am Burnaby, Bennett Library, Lab 2105

    Introduction to Business Statistics

    The first part of the presentation covers various resources related to business statistics, ie,  retail, wholesale, import & export, Canadian business counts, household spending, financial statistics, and 2016 Census results on population, demography, income, education and labour force status. The second part of the presentation would be a website navigation on how to find those resources on our website, then wrap up by a Q & A.

    Upcoming Workshops

    Dates Location
    Thursday, November 22, 2018 - 10:30am to 11:30am Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

    Next semester's workshops will be posted soon.

    Research programming

    A taste of parallel programming with Chapel

    Chapel is a relatively new high-level programming language for shared- and distributed-memory machines. It combines the ease-of-use of Python and the speed of C++ and is the perfect language to learn the basics of parallel programming, whether you are trying to accelerate your computation on a multi-core laptop or on an HPC cluster. In this one-hour hands-on introduction I will go over several of Chapel's high-level abstractions.

    Requirements:

    All attendees will need to bring their laptops with a remote ssh client installed (on Windows, the free edition of https://mobaxterm.mobatek.net/download.html is recommended; on Mac and Linux, no need to install anything). No need to install Chapel -- we'll play with it on a cluster, and guest accounts will be provided by the instructor.

    Please check this page for any updated information.

    Upcoming Workshops

    Dates Location
    Tuesday, October 23, 2018 - 3:00pm to 4:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

    Analyzing data using R

    In this workshop, we will talk about analyzing data using R. We will cover the following topics:

    1. Different types of data

    2. Cleaning data

    3. Exploring data using machine learning techniques.

    Please be advised that we will go through simple and well-known methods of analyzing data such that attending this workshop can be helpful for every person from different majors whose have lots of data to analyze.

    Requirements:

    • Bring your own fully charged laptop preloaded with R and RStudio
    • More information about software installation and other technical requirements are updated in this information page. Please check this page to ensure that you have everything installed prior to attending the workshop

    Upcoming Workshops

    Dates Location
    Tuesday, November 6, 2018 - 3:00pm to 4:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7200

    Introduction to Data Visualization – Examples by Tableau and d3.js

    This talk is designed for students and working professionals who are interested in techniques for data visualization and have no such background before. The focus of the talk will be the introduction to data visualization, from the view of visual perception and cognition, and some simple examples of data visualization with Tableau and JavaScript (d3).

    Requirements:

    • A laptop
    • Prerequisites: Download Tableau. (Student can download the Tableau for free through the official website: https://www.tableau.com/academic/students). Please do this prior to attending the workshop.

    Please check this page for any updated information.

    Upcoming Workshops

    Dates Location
    Tuesday, November 20, 2018 - 3:00pm to 4:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

    Eigenface Facial Recognition

    In this workshop participants will learn about human facial recognition and use MATLAB to explore which faces in a database are similar to theirs. We will introduce EigenFaces and the mathematics used to compute facial similarity including principal component analysis and singular value decomposition.

    Requirements:

    • This workshop will use MATLAB. Installation of MATLAB* is required but participants with no knowledge of the language may still be able to follow if they are familiar with other programming languages.
    • Participants will also need to bring a smart phone with a camera

    * Anyone with an SFU account should be allowed to register for a Mathworks account associated with Matlab, the link will allow them to sign in online
    https://matlab.mathworks.com/

    Please check this page for any updated information.

    Upcoming Workshops

    Dates Location
    Tuesday, December 4, 2018 - 3:30pm to 4:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 3008

    Programming with Python

    Python is a popular language for scientific computing, and great for general-purpose programming as well.

    This 2-day hands-on workshop will cover basic concepts and tools, including program design, version control, data management, and task automation. This workshop is offered by Software Carpentry, whose mission is to help scientists and engineers get more research done in less time and with less pain by teaching them basic lab skills for scientific computing.

    Participants will need to bring their own computer/laptop. Instructions on installing Python and other necessary information will be sent out to participants closer to the workshop date.

    Upcoming Workshops

    Dates Location
    Tuesday, October 30, 2018 - 9:30am to 4:30pm
    Wednesday, October 31, 2018 - 9:30am to 4:30pm
    Burnaby, SFU's Big Data Hub (Applied Science Building - Flexible Meeting Room ASB 10908)

    Research software

    Citation Management

    Next semester's workshops will be posted soon.

    GIS

    Mapping Census Data

    This workshop will cover two very practical skill areas for ArcGIS users:

    • finding Canadian Census data that is accessible to university researchers,
    • and mapping it using ArcGIS software.

    This workshop will guide you through tips for mapping large amounts of census data quickly and for working with spatial patterns and relationships among census variables.

    By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

    • find and choose Census data required for their research;
    • extract relevant Census data from Census files;
    • understand the census spatial units;
    • map census data using census spatial units.

    Software: ArcGIS Online, ArcGIS Desktop (participants will not need their own computer)

    Workshop page (SFU Canvas): GIS workshops page includes workshop descriptions and suggested streams for different disciplines, handouts, slides, and example datasets

    Upcoming Workshops

    Dates Location
    Thursday, October 25, 2018 - 12:30pm to 2:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Lab 2105

    Introduction to Spatial Data in Humanities: The Spatial Elements of Textual Analysis

    Many humanities researchers have some form of geographical information included in their research, such as objects, images, or texts from or about a particular place; narratives about a person’s movement or a place’s change over time; or information about networks of people or organizations. Whether places and spaces are at the heart of your research or are a part of it, mapping can help answer research questions and generate new ones by visualizing your data in new ways. It can help tell a story about place or space. This two-part workshop series will help humanities researchers map their place-based research with ArcGIS.

    The Spatial Elements of Textual Analysis
    The first workshop will cover the nuts and bolts of getting started mapping with ArcGIS. We will discuss how to extract data from your research, get it ready for analysis, and upload it into ArcGIS. The workshop will help humanities researchers explore and map the spatial elements of their research with ArcGIS.

    By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

    • extract data from their research;
    • get their data ready for spatial analysis;
    • upload data into ArcGIS Online;
    • use some basic mapping techniques with ArcGIS Online.

    Software: ArcGIS Online (participants will not need their own computer)

    Workshop page (SFU Canvas): GIS workshops page includes workshop descriptions and suggested streams for different disciplines, handouts, slides, and example datasets

    Creating Story Maps
    The second workshop will cover spatial analysis - the potential applications of your geographic information. We will demonstrate the analytic functions included in ArcGIS and discuss how to create context for your spatial data. We will also introduce Story Maps, an app that helps turn place-based information into narratives with a combination of maps, images, and text. Note: for this workshop, we will assume that you have already attended the first workshop or are comfortable with the material covered there.

    By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

    • create a Story Map;
    • extract spatial context from text.

    Upcoming Workshops

    Dates Location
    Wednesday, November 7, 2018 - 3:30pm to 5:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Lab 2105

    Introduction to Spatial Data in Humanities: Creating Story Maps

    Many humanities researchers have some form of geographical information included in their research, such as objects, images, or texts from or about a particular place; narratives about a person’s movement or a place’s change over time; or information about networks of people or organizations. Whether places and spaces are at the heart of your research or are a part of it, mapping can help answer research questions and generate new ones by visualizing your data in new ways. It can help tell a story about place or space. This two-part workshop series will help humanities researchers map their place-based research with ArcGIS.

    The Spatial Elements of Textual Analysis
    The first workshop will cover the nuts and bolts of getting started mapping with ArcGIS. We will discuss how to extract data from your research, get it ready for analysis, and upload it into ArcGIS. The workshop will help humanities researchers explore and map the spatial elements of their research with ArcGIS.

    Software: ArcGIS Online (participants will not need their own computer)

    By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

    • extract data from their research;
    • get their data ready for spatial analysis;
    • upload data into ArcGIS Online;
    • use some basic mapping techniques with ArcGIS Online.

    Creating Story Maps
    The second workshop will cover spatial analysis - the potential applications of your geographic information. We will demonstrate the analytic functions included in ArcGIS and discuss how to create context for your spatial data. We will also introduce Story Maps, an app that helps turn place-based information into narratives with a combination of maps, images, and text. Note: for this workshop, we will assume that you have already attended the first workshop or are comfortable with the material covered there.

    By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

    • create a Story Map;
    • extract spatial context from text.

    Software: ArcGIS Online (participants will not need their own computer)

    Workshop page (SFU Canvas): GIS workshops page includes workshop descriptions and suggested streams for different disciplines, handouts, slides, and example datasets

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Thursday, November 8, 2018 - 3:30pm to 5:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Lab 2105

      Intro to Geospatial Data with R

      The lessons in this workshop will cover how to open, work with, and plot vector and raster-format spatial data in R.

      Additional topics include:

      • working with spatial metadata (extent and coordinate reference systems),
      • reprojecting spatial data,
      • and working with raster time series data.

      By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

      • import and export raster and vector data from R;
      • analyze and edit raster and vector data;
      • explore spatio-temporal data in R.

      This full-day workshop will follow the Data Carpentries' syllabus.

      Prerequisites:

      Software requirements:

      • Participants will need to bring their own laptops with the most recent version of R and Rstudio installed. For installation instructions and to download the data used in this lesson, see the workshop homepage.

      Workshop page (SFU Canvas): GIS workshops page includes workshop descriptions and suggested streams for different disciplines, handouts, slides, and example datasets

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Tuesday, November 13, 2018 - 9:00am to 5:00pm Harbour Centre, Rm 1415

      GIS Day 2018 talks and presentations

      As part of GIS Day events, SFU Library, UBC Library and UBC Forestry are partnering to provide this year's celebration with an event showcasing exciting talks from a variety of speakers. Speaker names and schedule of talks/presentations will be announced shortly.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Wednesday, November 14, 2018 - 9:30am to 5:00pm Harbour Centre, Rm 1600

      Advanced GIS: Raster Data Analysis

      Raster data is continuous, pixelated data. For example, aerial photographs, LIDAR data, and digital elevation models store information as raster data. In contrast, vector data is discrete and is stored as geometric objects: points, lines and polygons. The tools available to you, and the kind of analysis you can conduct, with raster data are different than those for vector data. This session will focus on working with raster data in ArcGIS.

      By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

      • distinguish between different types of raster data;
      • work with digital elevation models (DEMs);
      • explore raster surface data (hill shade, contour, aspect data);
      • create and work with mosaic datasets.

      Software: ArcGIS Desktop 10.6 (participants will not need their own computer)

      Workshop page (SFU Canvas): GIS workshops page includes workshop descriptions and suggested streams for different disciplines, handouts, slides, and example datasets

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Thursday, November 22, 2018 - 2:30pm to 4:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Lab 2105

      Python

      Programming with Python

      Python is a popular language for scientific computing, and great for general-purpose programming as well.

      This 2-day hands-on workshop will cover basic concepts and tools, including program design, version control, data management, and task automation. This workshop is offered by Software Carpentry, whose mission is to help scientists and engineers get more research done in less time and with less pain by teaching them basic lab skills for scientific computing.

      Participants will need to bring their own computer/laptop. Instructions on installing Python and other necessary information will be sent out to participants closer to the workshop date.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Tuesday, October 30, 2018 - 9:30am to 4:30pm
      Wednesday, October 31, 2018 - 9:30am to 4:30pm
      Burnaby, SFU's Big Data Hub (Applied Science Building - Flexible Meeting Room ASB 10908)

      Qualitative Data Analysis

      Using NVivo for Humanities Research

      Does your research involve a large number of texts, different media, or even different types of files? Do you find it difficult to find and visualize trends in your research? Do you want to be able to do this without learning how to code? Come learn how NVivo can help you perform large-scale qualitative analysis without having to learn how to code! NVivo is a software package available through the SFU Library that helps with the organization and analysis of unstructured data. In this two-hour workshop, we will walk through what kinds of research questions NVivo can help you answer, work together on a sample project, and begin exploring some of the possibilities NVivo represents for your own research.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Tuesday, October 30, 2018 - 1:30pm to 3:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Lab 4009

      Doing More with NVivo for Mac

      Need help moving forward with your qualitative data analysis? If you've had some experience with bringing in documents and coding them, you’re ready to move on to analyzing your material. In this hands-on workshop, Graduate Peer NVivo Facilitators will walk you through the visualizations and queries that are available in NVivo for Mac and may be able to address other topics depending on the needs of the group.
       
      This workshop is suitable for those who have some experience with NVivo or who have already taken the Nuts and Bolts of NVivo workshop.
       
      This is a BYOL workshop: Bring Your Own Laptop, with the latest version of NVivo for Mac installed on it.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Wednesday, November 7, 2018 - 1:00pm to 3:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

      Making Literature Reviews a Breeze (almost) with NVivo for Mac

      This interactive workshop introduces importing and coding of literature review materials and key tools that can be particularly helpful when reviewing literature in your area of research.

      Topics covered include: introducing NVivo and setting up a project working with your information identifying themes, topics and ideas and collecting data to support them using tools such as text search query, matrix coding query, and Framework Matrix.

      What will you achieve from this course? At the end of this, you will have the knowledge to set up a literature review in NVivo, and begin to work with your information. You will also be able to use NVivo to organize your content and begin to identify themes, topics or ideas.

      It is appropriate for those who have had some experience with NVivo or who have taken the Nuts and Bolts of NVivo workshop. For more information about NVivo at SFU, please visit NVivo Software for Research Analysis.

      Participants should also have some familiarity with citation management software (Zotero, Mendeley, Refworks, EndNote, etc).

      Note: You will need to bring your own Mac laptop, loaded with the latest version of NVivo for Mac.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Wednesday, November 21, 2018 - 1:00pm to 3:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

      R (Software)

      Introduction to R for Non-Science Majors (2-day workshop)

      This workshop is designed for non-science students interested in the statistical computing program R. No prior knowledge of R is required. Often data outside of the sciences includes textual data, such as a corpus or series of surveys. In this workshop we’ll learn how to process textual data in R, as well as the basic skills to start analyzing it. Specific topics covered include the R environment (directories, workspace, scripts, and packages), data structures (vector, matrix, data frames, lists), and the beginnings of simple data analysis (built-in statistical packages, elementary statistics, etc.).

      Note: Workshop participants will need to bring their own laptops, with R and RStudio installed prior to attending the workshop.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Saturday, October 27, 2018 - 10:30am to 4:30pm
      Sunday, October 28, 2018 - 10:30am to 4:30pm
      Burnaby, SFU's Big Data Hub (Applied Science Building - Flexible Meeting Room ASB 10908)

      Statistics

      Introduction to Health Statistics

      This presentation covers health related statistics including:

      • CCHS- annual component and mental health,
      • Canadian Survey of Disability,
      • Aboriginal Peoples Survey,
      • vital statistics,
      • CHMS,
      • Canadian Cancer Registry,
      • General Social Survey- Caregiving & Care Receiving,
      • Census of Population.

      We will also talk about data dissemination (aggregate data and microdata/PUMF).

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Thursday, October 25, 2018 - 10:30am to 11:30am Burnaby, Bennett Library, Lab 2105

      Introduction to Business Statistics

      The first part of the presentation covers various resources related to business statistics, ie,  retail, wholesale, import & export, Canadian business counts, household spending, financial statistics, and 2016 Census results on population, demography, income, education and labour force status. The second part of the presentation would be a website navigation on how to find those resources on our website, then wrap up by a Q & A.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Thursday, November 22, 2018 - 10:30am to 11:30am Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

      Visual Analytics

      An Introduction to Using Tableau for Data Visualization

      Tableau is a data visualization tool that is being used to help analyze data and illustrate the patterns and insights behind them. This interactive workshop will introduce researchers or students to Tableau Public, a free access version of Tableau.

      Requirements:

      • No prior experience with Tableau is necessary.
      • Participants will need to bring their own laptop preloaded with the latest version of Tableau Public

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Monday, October 29, 2018 - 10:00am to 12:00pm Burnaby, SFU's Big Data Hub (Applied Science Building - Flexible Meeting Room ASB 10908)

      Doing more with Tableau for data visualization

      Tableau is a data visualization tool that is being used to help analyze data and illustrate the patterns and insights behind them. This interactive workshop is designed for researchers who are already familiar with Tableau Public, a free access version of Tableau.

      You will leave this workshop with an understanding of how to:
      • connect multiple datasets to the same Tableau workbook;
      • use advanced analysis features, like reference lines, trend lines and calculated fields;
      • and  create interactive charts and graphs.

      Requirements:

      This workshop is aimed at researchers who have prior experience with Tableau. The Research Commons workshop "An Introduction to Using Tableau for Data Visualization" is a recommended pre-requisite. 
       
      Participants will need to bring their own laptop preloaded with the latest version of Tableau Public.
       

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Monday, October 29, 2018 - 1:00pm to 3:00pm Burnaby, SFU's Big Data Hub (Applied Science Building - Flexible Meeting Room ASB 10908)

      Scholarly communication

      Preparing to Publish

      Graduate students are always encouraged to publish but often without really knowing what that means or how to start. This workshop will focus on navigating the peer review process and will also touch on the topics of open access, working with an editor, and co-authorship.  It will include a discussion of copyright transfer agreements and licenses and provide insight into publishing venues for assuring your research has the best possible visibility, accessibility, and impact.

      A few questions this session will help to answer:

      • How does the publishing cycle work?
      • How can you assess potential publishing venues?
      • What is peer review and how can you respond to reviewer comments?
      • What rights can you retain to your published research?
      • What are predatory publishers and how can you avoid them?

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Wednesday, October 24, 2018 - 10:30am to 12:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

      Make your research public: Pitching your work to The Conversation Canada

      Are you interested in contributing to the public discourse? Would you like your research to be read, understood, and discussed both inside and outside the academy? Learn how you can pitch your work to The Conversation Canada, a trusted, independent, international media resource dedicated to highlighting the work of the academic and research community for the public. Publishing with The Conversation not only ensures that your work is translated and transmitted to the broadest possible audience; you will also gain access to information about how your work has been read and shared online. Join us for a discussion about author requirements and questions you should ask yourself when developing your story pitch. 

      Scott White is Editor of The Conversation Canada. Previously, he was Editor-in-Chief of The Canadian Press and Vice-President, Content Strategy and Business Development at Postmedia Network. He has an MBA from the Rotman School of Management at the University of Toronto and is a graduate of the journalism program at Ryerson University.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Thursday, November 1, 2018 - 1:00pm to 2:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

      Get credit for your work: Build a sustainable online CV with ORCID

      • Are you looking to reduce the amount of manual data entry required when you submit a manuscript, apply for a grant, or update your CV?
      • Are you tired of receiving emails from online networking sites, asking you to pay for premium services?
      • Do you want to ensure that you get credit for all of your work?

      Then this workshop is for you.

      We will introduce ORCID (the Open Researcher and Contributor ID), a free, open, not-for-profit organization that provides authors with a unique numeric identifier to distinguish themselves from other researchers and automatically link their professional publications and activities. ORCID iDs persist throughout an author's scholarly career and ensure consistent, reliable attribution of their work.

      Bring your laptop and a copy of your CV: this interactive workshop will cover the basics and benefits of getting started with ORCID.

      Participants will leave with:

      • an ORCID iD,
      • a newly created online CV,
      • and an understanding of how to automatically keep their profile up-to-date.
       

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Tuesday, November 6, 2018 - 10:30am to 12:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

      Communicate with Purpose and Intent

      Do you feel lost or challenged when communicating your research to audiences who are non subject matter experts?  When you're asked about what your research is about, do you often feel it may be too complicated to explain, or you feel as though you must provide all the details for your audience to understand? In most situations, constraints with time limits what and how we can communicate with our research.  This workshop session will address some of those questions and provide strategies for communicating your research with purpose and intent.  If you are preparing for an upcoming presentation or just curious about how you can further develop your communication skills, we invite you to join us for this interactive workshop. 

      Dr. Poh Tan is an entrepreneur, a stem cell biologist, an educator, a volunteer and a mother.  She has made substantive contributions to many different fields and has made positive impacts on many people’s lives throughout her career. Poh’s current focus is on inspiring young children and their educators to use scientific thinking as a tool to open up their world and courageously walk into a bright future full of limitless possibilities.  Poh obtained her first PhD from the Faculty of Medicine at UBC focusing on the biology of blood stem cells. Her experience led her to a successful career in the biotechnology sector and eventually, helped her become a successful entrepreneur with two businesses.  Poh's passion lies in developing scientific literacy in young children and is currently pursuing a second PhD at SFU.  Through her academic and industry experience, Poh has communicated her research to national and international audiences, including sharing her knowledge as a two time TEDx speaker.  She coaches graduate students to develop their oral and written skills to effectively communicate their research to different types of audiences.     

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Thursday, November 8, 2018 - 1:00pm to 3:30pm Burnaby, SFU's Big Data Hub (Applied Science Building - Flexible Meeting Room ASB 10908)

      Towards equal, accessible, and just scholarship: Make your work discoverable through ethical publishing

      Making work publicly available and discoverable through open access publishing is the best way to ensure that publicly-funded work can benefit the wider community. The lack of access to scholarship due to paywalls impacts researchers, policy makers, activists, non-profit workers, and many others globally. This workshop will examine the sometimes complex world of open access publishing, including "gold" open access (through open access journals), "green" open access (self-archiving), hybrid journals, article processing fees, concerns about journal quality, and more.   It will include insight into publishing venues for assuring your research has the best possible visibility, accessibility, and impact.

      A few questions this session will help to answer:

      • What are the options for making work open access at SFU?
      • How is SFU leading sustainable publishing initiatives through the Public Knowledge Project (PKP)?
      • How can you track the impact and reach of work deposited in Summit?
      • How can you assess potential publishing venues?
      • What rights can you retain to your published research?
      • What are predatory publishers and how can you avoid them?
      Kate Shuttleworth is a Digital Scholarship Librarian at SFU. She has a Master’s in Library and Information Studies from UBC and a BA in Communications Studies from the University of Calgary. Kate’s passion for open scholarship originated from her work at cIRcle, UBC’s institutional repository, where she streamlined the organization of item collections and encouraged researchers to self-archive their work. In her role at SFU Kate is an advocate of ethical publishing practices and helps to administer the Central Open Access Fund and promote the Open Access Policy.
         

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Thursday, November 8, 2018 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm Burnaby, SFU's Big Data Hub (Applied Science Building - Flexible Meeting Room ASB 10908)

      Writing

      Graduate Open Writing Lab: Write Time, Write Space (drop-in)

      The Graduate Open Writing Lab is for all graduate students who want the time and a quiet, dedicated space to work on their writing. A Graduate Writing Facilitator will be available for consultations and to answer questions.

      Registration not required - please drop in!

      Fall Semester 2018 [September 7 to December 3]

      Burnaby Campus
      Graduate Open Writing Lab  - Mondays, 2:00 pm to 4:30 pm, SFU Burnaby, W.A.C. Bennett Library, Research Commons, Rm 7010
      (no sessions October 8 and November 12)

      Vancouver Campus
      Graduate Open Writing Lab - Fridays, 11:30 am to 2:30 pm, SFU Vancouver, Harbour Centre - Room HC 7400

       

      Writing Workshops

      Please register for the following writing workshops:

      Writing a Winning Business Plan

      What is a business plan? What is its purpose? What sections do I need? What elements are key to an effective executive summary?  This workshop is designed for anyone with little to no experience with writing an effective and persuasive business plan.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Monday, October 22, 2018 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

      Preparing to Publish

      Graduate students are always encouraged to publish but often without really knowing what that means or how to start. This workshop will focus on navigating the peer review process and will also touch on the topics of open access, working with an editor, and co-authorship.  It will include a discussion of copyright transfer agreements and licenses and provide insight into publishing venues for assuring your research has the best possible visibility, accessibility, and impact.

      A few questions this session will help to answer:

      • How does the publishing cycle work?
      • How can you assess potential publishing venues?
      • What is peer review and how can you respond to reviewer comments?
      • What rights can you retain to your published research?
      • What are predatory publishers and how can you avoid them?

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Wednesday, October 24, 2018 - 10:30am to 12:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

      Write Conversations: Going with the Flow: Cohesion and Coherence

      This workshop will begin with a discussion focused on how we can communicate the logical progression of our ideas. We will explore a number of ways to develop a clear, compelling, and logical argument from the beginning, through the middle, to the end of a piece of scholarly writing. Following this workshop is the Graduate Open Writing Lab; you are welcome to stay and work on your writing.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Friday, October 26, 2018 - 10:30am to 11:30am Harbour Centre, Rm 7400

      Write Conversations: Presenting with E.A.S.E. - Oral Presentations

      Are you presenting to a scholarly audience at a conference in a room with 300 or more people? Maybe, you'll be presenting in a seminar, a workshop or to your colleagues? There are best practices for making your presentation Engaging, Actionable, Simple and Entertaining. Sign up for this workshop and learn some presentation skills from a 2013 TEDx speaker.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Monday, October 29, 2018 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

      Critical Thinking for Critical Writing

      Critical writing depends on critical thinking. However, we often get caught up in reading sources solely for content or information, neglecting critical reflection on authors’ reasoning, style, and argumentation, which then prevents our writing from being as critical or analytical as it should be. This workshop will help graduate writers rethink how to approach sources and their own writing for successfully engaging in academic discourse!

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Tuesday, October 30, 2018 - 12:30pm to 2:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7200

      Write Conversations: Still human after all: Addressing positionality in your writing

      Confused about how you and your voice fit into your academic writing or “objective” research? Starting to realize that, as the author, you are a unique factor that affects your writing? Please join our conversation about addressing positionality in your writing, which should leave you less confused and more confident moving forward!

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Friday, November 2, 2018 - 10:30am to 11:30am Harbour Centre, Rm 7400

      Write Conversations: The Work We Do After the Work We Did: Editing, Revising, and Proofreading

      This workshop will begin with a discussion on the differences between revising, editing, and proofreading as well as their importance in the writing process. We will explore a number of revising, editing, and proofreading techniques employed by successful writers. Following this workshop is the Graduate Open Writing Lab; you are welcome to stay and work on your writing.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Friday, November 9, 2018 - 10:30am to 11:30am Harbour Centre, Rm 7400

      Write Conversations: Writing More Concisely

      Get to the point. Say more in fewer words. Bring your own strategies for writing concisely and learn some new ones, too. As Dante reminds us: “Let thy words be counted.”

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Friday, November 16, 2018 - 10:30am to 11:30am Harbour Centre, Rm 7400

      Write Conversations: Outlining and Reverse Outlining

      Done with your reading and ready to write? Learn strategies for planning your first draft and for tightening the organization and flow of your final draft.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Monday, November 19, 2018 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

      Thesis reBoot

      Thesis reBoot is a day-long thesis writing retreat designed for graduate students who have already participated in Thesis Boot Camp.  

      Along with a comfortable, quiet working environment, writing and research support, and snacks and lunches, this day-long writing retreat offers students community and motivation in that final push towards the completion of their dissertation or thesis.

      More information can be found on the Thesis reBoot page.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Wednesday, November 21, 2018 - 8:30am to 5:00pm Harbour Centre, Rm 1430

      Write Conversations: Managing Writing Anxiety

      Being anxious about academic writing can lead to unhelpful writing habits like avoidance and procrastination. Join us for a discussion on how to make more progress by alleviating writing anxiety!

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Friday, November 23, 2018 - 10:30am to 11:30am Harbour Centre, Rm 7400
      Monday, December 3, 2018 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

      Write Conversations: Writing for Collaboration in the Sciences

      This write conversations session is an informal dialogue about writing styles, specifically for the purpose of creating collaborative relationships between scientists. Laboratory research depends on collaborative ideas and technologies to make advances. This session will focus on writing styles for letters, proposals, and emails to potential collaborators both in academia and industry.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Monday, November 26, 2018 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

      Write Conversations: The Home Stretch: Revising and Proofreading

      You can feel yourself making serious progress, and maybe you even have drafted most of what you want to write! Knowing when to revise and what to look for, and when it’s time to proofread, will help you edit your own writing more effectively.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Friday, November 30, 2018 - 10:30am to 11:30am Harbour Centre, Rm 7400

      Thesis

      Thesis reBoot

      Thesis reBoot is a day-long thesis writing retreat designed for graduate students who have already participated in Thesis Boot Camp.  

      Along with a comfortable, quiet working environment, writing and research support, and snacks and lunches, this day-long writing retreat offers students community and motivation in that final push towards the completion of their dissertation or thesis.

      More information can be found on the Thesis reBoot page.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Wednesday, November 21, 2018 - 8:30am to 5:00pm Harbour Centre, Rm 1430

      Thesis Template and Resources

      This demonstration introduces you to the Thesis Submission process and the Thesis Template. It will begin with an introduction to required copyright permissions from the Copyright Office at SFU, followed by a review of the overall submission process (including deadlines and supporting documentation). Additionally, SFU Library's research data specialists will give instruction on how to preserve and, if appropriate, share research data for future uses.

      The technical part of the workshop will follow, where you will be walked through the resources on the website and the functionality of the thesis template.

      Students are encouraged to bring their own computer and thesis document(s) to work along with the facilitator during the workshop.

      Learn how to:

      • request copyright permissions
      • write in the MS Word template-based file
      • format your text using styles
      • bring text in from other documents
      • insert figures, images, and auto-numbered captions
      • generate the Table of Contents, List of Tables, List of Figures, etc.

      If you’ve begun writing, send your document to theses@sfu.ca in advance of the workshop; one might be used in demonstrating the Library’s thesis template. After the session, the formatted document will be returned in which the student can continue his/her work.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Thursday, October 25, 2018 - 1:30pm to 3:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons
      Wednesday, November 14, 2018 - 1:30pm to 3:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons