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Research Commons: Workshops for graduate students & postdoctoral fellows

The Research Commons is pleased to offer you a range of workshops. Register for upcoming workshops. Search by date in our workshops calendar.

If you do not see the topic(s) you are interested in and/or would like a specialized workshop for yourself and a group of colleagues, send a request to research-commons@sfu.ca.

SFU values diversity and is committed to inclusion. If you require any disability related accommodations in order to fully access and participate in our workshops and/or events, please contact us directly at library-workshops@sfu.ca. Please contact us as soon as possible as some accommodations will require lead time to arrange (i.e. CART, ASL)

All in a Day

All in a Day: Research Roadmap - is a suite of our most popular workshops for graduate students and postdoctoral fellows. Mid-morning refreshments will be served at 11:00am

Research Ethics: Ethics Principles and Institutional Requirements

The purpose of this session is to engage students in considering and discussing the ethical conduct of research involving humans. A number of topics will be covered, including a brief overview of the ethics review process.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Saturday, May 25, 2019 - 9:30am to 11:00am Vancouver, Harbour Centre, Rm 1530

Cite your sources easier and faster with Zotero

Want to make your research and writing more efficient? Hate the last minute rush of trying to create a correctly formatted bibliography? This workshop is for you! We will introduce Zotero, a citation management tool that can help you import, organize, share, and manage your citations and documents, as well as create correctly formatted in-text citations and bibliographies in almost any style -- in seconds.

Bring your laptop: this interactive workshop will cover registration, installation, and everything that you need to know to get up and running with Zotero.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Saturday, May 25, 2019 - 9:30am to 11:00am Vancouver, Harbour Centre, Rm 1600

Writing and Researching Your Literature Review

This interactive workshop focuses on the literature review and literature search. At this session you will learn:

  • conventions of literature reviews,
  • search strategies,
  • advanced features of research databases,
  • and tips to further develop effective and efficient research skills.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Saturday, May 25, 2019 - 11:30am to 1:30pm Vancouver, Harbour Centre, Rm 1600

Hands-on with the Library Thesis Word Template

The SFU Library thesis template is a Microsoft Word file designed to assist students in preparing theses, projects, and extended essays. The template uses custom styles to ensure that your document  conforms to SFU-specific formatting standards and acceptable for Library submission.

This hands-on workshop will cover:

  • the structure of the SFU Library thesis/project/extended essays
  • styles: what Word styles are, the organization of the Library thesis template styles and how to apply the styles
  • how to insert tables, figures/images, auto-numbered captions and notes
  • how to generate and update the Table of Contents, List of Tables and List of Figures
Requirements: Participants will need to bring their own laptop (either Mac or PC) with Microsoft Word installed. Note: the template has been tested with the following versions of MS Word: Word 2011 (Mac), Word 2013 (Windows), and Word 2016/365 (Windows and Mac), so it is advisable not have anything older than these versions.
 
Working Files: Closer to the workshop date, necessary working files will be emailed to all registrants.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Saturday, May 25, 2019 - 2:00pm to 4:00pm Vancouver, Harbour Centre, Rm 1530

Preparing to Publish

Graduate students are always encouraged to publish but often without really knowing what that means or how to start. This workshop will focus on navigating the peer review process and will also touch on the topics of open access, working with an editor, and co-authorship.  It will include a discussion of copyright transfer agreements and licenses and provide insight into publishing venues for assuring your research has the best possible visibility, accessibility, and impact.

A few questions this session will help to answer:

  • How does the publishing cycle work?
  • How can you assess potential publishing venues?
  • What is peer review and how can you respond to reviewer comments?
  • What rights can you retain to your published research?
  • What are predatory publishers and how can you avoid them?

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Saturday, May 25, 2019 - 2:00pm to 4:00pm Vancouver, Harbour Centre, Rm 1600

Citation Management Drop-in Lab

Have questions about using citation management software, like Zotero or Mendeley? We can help! Our citation management experts can introduce you to citation management tools, answer questions, and demonstrate features and techniques. Bring your laptop and your questions!

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Wednesday, May 29, 2019 - 1:00pm to 3:00pm Vancouver, Harbour Centre, Rm 7400

Digital Humanities

Next semester's workshops will be posted soon.

EAL/ESL

Academic Writing for Graduate Students (EAL)

Academic Writing for Graduate Students is a non-credit, 10-week co-curricular course designed for graduate students for whom English is an additional language (EAL).  You will learn how to apply your analytical skills to the discourses of your chosen disciplines and to explore how effective academic writing in Western scholarly tradition is achieved in order to position yourself as junior scholars in your chosen academic communities. 

The course is offered as a collaboration between the Student Learning Commons, Research Commons, and The Center for English Learning, Teaching and Research (CELLTR).

Required textbook: (Supplied)

Swales, John M., & Feak, Christine B. (2011). Academic Writing for Graduate Students: Essential Tasks and Skills (3rd Edition). Ann Arbor: U of Michigan Press (ISBN: 978-0472-03475-8).

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Wednesday, May 15, 2019 - 9:30am to 12:20pm
Wednesday, May 22, 2019 - 9:30am to 12:20pm
Wednesday, May 29, 2019 - 9:30am to 12:20pm
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 9:30am to 12:20pm
Wednesday, June 12, 2019 - 9:30am to 12:20pm
Wednesday, June 19, 2019 - 9:30am to 12:20pm
Wednesday, June 26, 2019 - 9:30am to 12:20pm
Wednesday, July 3, 2019 - 9:30am to 12:20pm
Wednesday, July 10, 2019 - 9:30am to 12:20pm
Wednesday, July 17, 2019 - 9:30am to 12:20pm
Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

Learning

Challenging Impostor Syndrome

Ever feel like your success is due to luck?  That others around you are more intelligent?  That your graduate program made a mistake admitting you--a mistake they might realize soon?  If you have struggled with feeling like you don’t fit in academia, this workshop is for you.   We will focus on understanding and challenging “impostor syndrome”—a remarkably common syndrome amongst graduate students.  You will learn about research on the topic, hear others’ experiences and reflect on your own, and discover some concrete tools for dealing with the thoughts, feelings, and behaviours associated with feeling like an imposter.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Thursday, May 2, 2019 - 12:45pm to 1:45pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

Managing Up: The Student-Supervisor Relationship

In this interactive workshop, we will discuss:

  • how to maximize your relationship with your supervisor,
  • develop a clear sense of your rights and responsibilities as a student (and those of your supervisor and others involved in your graduate program),
  • solve common problems that sometimes beset the supervisory relationship.

Speakers at the workshop may include:

Dr. George Agnes, Associate Dean - Students | Office of Graduate Studies and Postdoctoral Fellows
Laura Reid, Ombudsperson | Office of the Ombudsperson

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Wednesday, May 1, 2019 - 12:45pm to 1:45pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

Research Ethics: Ethics Principles and Institutional Requirements

The purpose of this session is to engage students in considering and discussing the ethical conduct of research involving humans. A number of topics will be covered, including a brief overview of the ethics review process.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Saturday, May 25, 2019 - 9:30am to 11:00am Vancouver, Harbour Centre, Rm 1530

New Year's Resolution Writing Spectacular

Get 2019 off to a spectacular start! Join us for a full day of workshops and writing support for graduate students and post-doctoral fellows on Friday January 11 at SFU Harbour Centre in Vancouver. Register for as many workshops as you choose and stay for our dedicated writing time in the afternoon. Morning and afternoon refreshments will be served.

Next semester's workshops will be posted soon.

Publishing Symposium

Are you interested in publishing your academic work, extending the reach of your research, and developing your online presence? Join us for a one day Publishing Symposium. Register for one, two, or three workshops below and get everything you need to prepare to publish and share the word about your research.

Publishing Symposium

Are you interested in publishing your academic work, extending the reach of your research, and developing your online presence? The day includes three workshops which will give you everything you need to prepare to publish and share the word about your research.

Preparing to Publish
This workshop will focus on navigating the peer review process and will also touch on the topics of open access, working with an editor, and co-authorship.  It will include a discussion of copyright transfer agreements and licenses and provide insight into publishing venues for assuring your research has the best possible visibility, accessibility, and impact.

Who is looking at your research and how can you measure it?
Find out more about research impact – what it is, how to measure it and how to leverage it.

Raising Your Online Research Profile
This workshop will look at the big picture and context for developing your online academic narrative: why do you want a research profile? How do you get your work out there? The workshop will provide a hands-on introduction to tools for privacy, social media, and auditing and building your online academic portfolio.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Friday, June 21, 2019 - 10:00am to 4:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

Research data management

Introduction to Research Data Management

This workshop will introduce participants to the fundamentals of RDM including developing a Research Data Management Plan, organizing data, documenting data, storing and sharing data and archiving data.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Thursday, May 2, 2019 - 10:00am to 11:00am Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

Plan Data

Collect. Describe. Store. Backup. Preserve. Share.

Draft a plan to manage your research data and ensure its openness over time. The focus of this workshop will be working with DMP Assistant, an online data management plan utility. A sample case will be provided or build a plan using your research.

Note: Please bring your own fully charged laptop to this workshop.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Friday, June 14, 2019 - 9:30am to 12:30pm Burnaby, SFU's Big Data Hub (Applied Science Building - Flexible Meeting Room ASB 10908)

Secure data

Protect your research data by following strong security practices. This workshop will cover topics including:

  • cloud storage,
  • full disk encryption,
  • threat modelling,
  • communication and file sharing,
  • account security,
  • two-factor authentication (2FA), and
  • digital preservation.

Learn how to keep data secure with SFU resources.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Friday, June 14, 2019 - 1:30pm to 3:00pm Burnaby, SFU's Big Data Hub (Applied Science Building - Flexible Meeting Room ASB 10908)

Research programming

Using yt for analysis and visualization of volumetric data in Python

In this workshop we will take a look at yt, a Python package for analyzing multi-resolution volumetric and particle data. Initially written for working with astrophysical simulation data, yt is now widely used across many disciplines dealing with 3D simulation or observational/experimental data. We will also look at using yt for data analysis and manipulation, including creating isosurfaces and streamlines and subsetting data in many different ways.

Requirements

Please bring your laptop with Python 3 and yt installed as described here. Please make sure that you can start yt

import yt

before coming to the workshop, as we will not be debugging your yt installation during the workshop. I assume some familiarity with basic Python including running it on your laptop. Feel free to simply drop by and watch yt on the big screen, if you don't feel like following the hand-on exercises.

-------------------

Note: This workshop is organized and facilitated by SciProg. SciProg—short for Scientific Programming Study Group—is dedicated to building a community of SFU researchers who perform computational data analysis as part of their academic work. SciProg promotes skill sharing and collaboration by (1) organizing 60 to 90-minute interactive workshops covering a wide range of software tools, (2) providing Q&A sessions for peer-to-peer assistance and collaboration, and (3) bringing researchers together at social events like Hacky Hours.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Tuesday, April 30, 2019 - 3:00pm to 4:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7200

Introduction to Database and SQL

This is an introductory course on Databases and SQL Querying. There are no pre-requisites for this workshop. If you are looking to get acquainted with the concept of Databases and Queries, this is the right workshop for you.
 
Requirements:
Bring your laptop and we will walk through very basic installation to setting up your environment to creating your first table and writing queries against it.
 

-------------------

Note: This workshop is organized and facilitated by SciProg. SciProg—short for Scientific Programming Study Group—is dedicated to building a community of SFU researchers who perform computational data analysis as part of their academic work. SciProg promotes skill sharing and collaboration by (1) organizing 60 to 90-minute interactive workshops covering a wide range of software tools, (2) providing Q&A sessions for peer-to-peer assistance and collaboration, and (3) bringing researchers together at social events like Hacky Hours.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Friday, May 31, 2019 - 1:30pm to 3:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

Introduction to Social Network Analysis with R

Social Network Analysis is to visualize and analyze data from a social network like Twitter or Facebook. If you're involved in analytics in any capacity, this course will be a huge help, teaching you how the R SNA and igraph modules works and how to format data for analysis, create graphs, analyze network graphs, and visualize networks.
 
Requirements:
  • Basic knowledge of R programming, but no knowledge of social network analysis required.
  • Please make sure you have the most recent version of R and RStudio installed on your computer.

-------------------

Note: This workshop is organized and facilitated by SciProg. SciProg—short for Scientific Programming Study Group—is dedicated to building a community of SFU researchers who perform computational data analysis as part of their academic work. SciProg promotes skill sharing and collaboration by (1) organizing 60 to 90-minute interactive workshops covering a wide range of software tools, (2) providing Q&A sessions for peer-to-peer assistance and collaboration, and (3) bringing researchers together at social events like Hacky Hours.

 

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Friday, June 7, 2019 - 1:30pm to 3:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

Introduction to Bash shell, Python programming, and Git version control

We start this 2-day hands-on workshop with an introduction to bash shell, a popular Linux command-line environment. By the end of this hands-on session you will know how to navigate the file system from the command line, how to run basic commands, and how to do more complex things with just a few keystrokes.

Then we move to Python, a popular language for scientific computing and great for general-purpose programming as well.  This workshop will cover basic concepts and tools, including program design, version control, data management, and task automation. This workshop is offered by The Carpentries, whose mission is to help scientists and engineers get more research done in less time and with less pain by teaching them basic lab skills for scientific computing. 

Finally the workshop will end with a 3-hour session on Git, the world’s most popular version control system. You will learn how to track your project history in a Git repository, how to work with remote repositories on GitHub, how to collaborate with others using Git, and how to build a free static website with a Git repository on GitHub.

Participants will need to bring their own computer/laptop. Please see note above for instructions for installing Python and other necessary files.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Thursday, July 11, 2019 - 9:30am to 4:30pm
Friday, July 12, 2019 - 9:30am to 4:30pm
Burnaby, SFU's Big Data Hub (Applied Science Building - Flexible Meeting Room ASB 10908)

Research software

Citation Management

Cite your sources easier and faster with Zotero

Want to make your research and writing more efficient? Hate the last minute rush of trying to create a correctly formatted bibliography? This workshop is for you! We will introduce Zotero, a citation management tool that can help you import, organize, share, and manage your citations and documents, as well as create correctly formatted in-text citations and bibliographies in almost any style -- in seconds.

Bring your laptop: this interactive workshop will cover registration, installation, and everything that you need to know to get up and running with Zotero.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Wednesday, May 1, 2019 - 10:00am to 11:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons
Tuesday, June 11, 2019 - 2:00pm to 3:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

Level Up! Tips and Tricks for Research Productivity

Learn how to keep up with research! In this workshop, we'll go over tips and tricks that can save you time during your research, including setting search and citation alerts, forward chaining, software tools to help with writing reference lists and literature reviews, and more.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Friday, May 10, 2019 - 11:00am to 11:30am Vancouver, Harbour Centre, Rm 1425

Cite your sources easier and faster with Zotero

Want to make your research and writing more efficient? Hate the last minute rush of trying to create a correctly formatted bibliography? This workshop is for you! We will introduce Zotero, a citation management tool that can help you import, organize, share, and manage your citations and documents, as well as create correctly formatted in-text citations and bibliographies in almost any style -- in seconds.

Bring your laptop: this interactive workshop will cover registration, installation, and everything that you need to know to get up and running with Zotero.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Saturday, May 25, 2019 - 9:30am to 11:00am Vancouver, Harbour Centre, Rm 1600

Citation Management Drop-in Lab

Have questions about using citation management software, like Zotero or Mendeley? We can help! Our citation management experts can introduce you to citation management tools, answer questions, and demonstrate features and techniques. Bring your laptop and your questions!

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Wednesday, May 29, 2019 - 1:00pm to 3:00pm Vancouver, Harbour Centre, Rm 7400

GIS

Introduction to Spatial Thinking and ArcGIS

  • Which areas in Ontario are susceptible to drought? Which areas are susceptible to longer periods of drought and which to shorter periods?
  • What is the travel route of the Anna's hummingbird (Calypte anna)? Does it pass close to areas where predators are present, specifically those which prey on eggs?
  • Are neighbourhoods with low socioeconomic status spatially correlated to high morbidity rates?

Many of these questions ask about the spatial relationship between two or more phenomena. This workshop is an introduction to spatial thinking and the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). This workshop assumes attendees have no previous experience with GIS.

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • think spatially about their research;
  • understand the elements of GIS;
  • use a leading industry software (ArcGIS);
  • create simple maps using geospatial data;
  • look for and find geospatial data and resources.

Software:  Participants will need to bring their own computer, running the Windows operating system. This workshop requires the use of ArcGIS Desktop, which is available for download and can be installed on Windows operating systems only. Instructions on installing ArcGIS Desktop and other necessary information will be sent out to participants closer to the workshop date.

Workshop page (SFU Canvas): GIS workshops page includes workshop descriptions and suggested streams for different disciplines, handouts, slides, and example datasets

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Wednesday, May 8, 2019 - 2:30pm to 4:30pm Vancouver, Harbour Centre, Rm 7400

Introduction to QGIS

GIS software doesn’t have to be expensive! QGIS is a free, open source GIS platform with powerful tools and wide variety of plugins. Learn how to use the basic tools in QGIS for your spatial projects. 

Learning Outcomes: By the end of this workshop you will be able to:

  • Import data to and export data from QGIS
  • Edit data within QGIS
  • Do basic vector analysis in QGIS
  • Do basic raster analysis in QGIS
  • Export simple maps using the layout manager

Software: QGIS (Windows version) - installed on Lab computers

Core Competencies: vector analysis, raster analysis, data management

Pre-Requisite: Basic knowledge of GIS and/or some familiarity with ArcGIS. Otherwise, we suggest taking Intro to Spatial Thinking and ArcGIS workshop.

Workshop page (SFU Canvas): GIS workshops page includes workshop descriptions and suggested streams for different disciplines, handouts, slides, and example datasets

 

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Friday, June 7, 2019 - 2:00pm to 4:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Lab 2105

Python

Using yt for analysis and visualization of volumetric data in Python

In this workshop we will take a look at yt, a Python package for analyzing multi-resolution volumetric and particle data. Initially written for working with astrophysical simulation data, yt is now widely used across many disciplines dealing with 3D simulation or observational/experimental data. We will also look at using yt for data analysis and manipulation, including creating isosurfaces and streamlines and subsetting data in many different ways.

Requirements

Please bring your laptop with Python 3 and yt installed as described here. Please make sure that you can start yt

import yt

before coming to the workshop, as we will not be debugging your yt installation during the workshop. I assume some familiarity with basic Python including running it on your laptop. Feel free to simply drop by and watch yt on the big screen, if you don't feel like following the hand-on exercises.

-------------------

Note: This workshop is organized and facilitated by SciProg. SciProg—short for Scientific Programming Study Group—is dedicated to building a community of SFU researchers who perform computational data analysis as part of their academic work. SciProg promotes skill sharing and collaboration by (1) organizing 60 to 90-minute interactive workshops covering a wide range of software tools, (2) providing Q&A sessions for peer-to-peer assistance and collaboration, and (3) bringing researchers together at social events like Hacky Hours.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Tuesday, April 30, 2019 - 3:00pm to 4:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7200

Introduction to Bash shell, Python programming, and Git version control

We start this 2-day hands-on workshop with an introduction to bash shell, a popular Linux command-line environment. By the end of this hands-on session you will know how to navigate the file system from the command line, how to run basic commands, and how to do more complex things with just a few keystrokes.

Then we move to Python, a popular language for scientific computing and great for general-purpose programming as well.  This workshop will cover basic concepts and tools, including program design, version control, data management, and task automation. This workshop is offered by The Carpentries, whose mission is to help scientists and engineers get more research done in less time and with less pain by teaching them basic lab skills for scientific computing. 

Finally the workshop will end with a 3-hour session on Git, the world’s most popular version control system. You will learn how to track your project history in a Git repository, how to work with remote repositories on GitHub, how to collaborate with others using Git, and how to build a free static website with a Git repository on GitHub.

Participants will need to bring their own computer/laptop. Please see note above for instructions for installing Python and other necessary files.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Thursday, July 11, 2019 - 9:30am to 4:30pm
Friday, July 12, 2019 - 9:30am to 4:30pm
Burnaby, SFU's Big Data Hub (Applied Science Building - Flexible Meeting Room ASB 10908)

Qualitative Data Analysis

NVivo Drop-in Lab

Bring your laptop and your NVivo questions to this drop-in lab session! Our facilitators are experienced NVivo users, and can help orient researchers to using NVivo software for organizing, coding, and analyzing textual, audiovisual, social media, and other data. They can also support other uses of NVivo, such as organizing literature reviews and handling survey data.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Wednesday, May 15, 2019 - 1:00pm to 3:00pm Vancouver, Harbour Centre, Rm 7400
Wednesday, July 10, 2019 - 1:00pm to 3:00pm Vancouver, Harbour Centre, Rm 7400

Introduction to NVivo for Windows

NVivo is a qualitative data analysis software program, but what does that mean -- and what does it mean for your research? Find out what NVivo is, when to use it, and how to get started.

In this hands-on introductory workshop, you'll take a tour of the NVivo software environment, using sample data. You’ll be introduced to NVivo’s functions and you’ll leave equipped with the basic info you need to begin working with NVivo. Topics introduced may include importing files and beginning coding.

This workshop is suitable for those with little or no experience using NVivo or other qualitative data analysis software.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Wednesday, May 22, 2019 - 1:30pm to 3:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Lab 4009
Tuesday, July 16, 2019 - 5:30pm to 7:00pm Vancouver, Harbour Centre, Lab 1350

Introduction to NVivo for Mac

NVivo is a qualitative data analysis software program, but what does that mean -- and what does it mean for your research? Find out what NVivo is, when to use it, and how to get started.

In this hands-on introductory workshop, you'll take a tour of the NVivo software environment, using sample data. You’ll be introduced to NVivo’s functions and you’ll leave equipped with the basic info you need to begin working with NVivo. Topics introduced may include importing files and beginning coding.

This workshop is suitable for those with little or no experience using NVivo or other qualitative data analysis software.

Notes:
1. This workshop is for NVivo for Mac. The Windows interface is significantly different. Please check here for NVivo for Windows workshops being offered.
2. Please bring your own Mac laptop preloaded with the latest version of NVivo. You can download NVivo and the license key with your SFU computing ID by using the self-serve download link here. If you are unable to get past the authentication page, then please email nvivo-rc@sfu.ca.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Thursday, May 30, 2019 - 10:00am to 11:30am Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

Making Literature Reviews Easier with NVivo for Windows

This interactive workshop introduces importing and coding of literature review materials and key tools that can be particularly helpful when reviewing literature in your area of research.

Topics covered include:

  • introducing NVivo and setting up a project
  • working with your information
  • identifying themes, topics and ideas and collecting data to support them
  • using tools such as text search query, matrix coding query, and Framework Matrix.

What will you achieve from this session? You will have the knowledge to set up a literature review in NVivo, and begin to work with your information. You will also be able to use NVivo to organize your content and begin to identify themes, topics or ideas. It is appropriate for those who have had some experience with NVivo. For more information about NVivo at SFU, please visit NVivo Software for Research Analysis.

Participants should also have some familiarity with citation management software (Zotero, Mendeley, Refworks, EndNote, etc). Zotero will be used during this workshop.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Thursday, June 13, 2019 - 1:00pm to 2:30pm Vancouver, Harbour Centre, Lab 1350

Advanced NVivo for Windows

Need help moving forward with your qualitative data analysis? If you’re already comfortable with bringing in documents and coding them, you’re ready to move on to analyzing your material. In this hands-on workshop, Graduate Peer NVivo Facilitators will walk you through visualizations and queries using sample data and may be able to address other topics depending on the needs of the group.

PREREQUISITE:
Before registering for this workshop, you must be familiar with coding in NVivo and/or have already taken the Introduction to NVivo workshop.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Wednesday, June 19, 2019 - 2:00pm to 3:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Lab 4009

Making Literature Reviews Easier with NVivo for Mac

This interactive workshop introduces importing and coding of literature review materials and key tools that can be particularly helpful when reviewing literature in your area of research.

Topics covered include:

  • introducing NVivo and setting up a project
  • working with your information
  • identifying themes, topics and ideas and collecting data to support them
  • using tools such as text search query, matrix coding query, and Framework Matrix.

What will you achieve from this session? You will have the knowledge to set up a literature review in NVivo, and begin to work with your information. You will also be able to use NVivo to organize your content and begin to identify themes, topics or ideas. It is appropriate for those who have had some experience with NVivo. For more information about NVivo at SFU, please visit NVivo Software for Research Analysis.

Participants should also have some familiarity with citation management software (Zotero, Mendeley, Refworks, EndNote, etc). Zotero will be used during this workshop.

Note: You will need to bring your own Mac laptop, installed with the latest version of NVivo for Mac.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Wednesday, July 3, 2019 - 10:00am to 11:30am Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

Introduction to NVivo for Mac (in Mac Lab)

NVivo is a qualitative data analysis software program, but what does that mean -- and what does it mean for your research? Find out what NVivo is, when to use it, and how to get started.

In this hands-on introductory workshop, you'll take a tour of the NVivo software environment, using sample data. You’ll be introduced to NVivo’s functions and you’ll leave equipped with the basic info you need to begin working with NVivo. Topics introduced may include importing files and beginning coding.

This workshop is suitable for those with little or no experience using NVivo or other qualitative data analysis software.

Notes:
1. This workshop is for NVivo for Mac. The Windows interface is significantly different. Please check here for NVivo for Windows workshops being offered.
2. This workshop takes place in a Mac lab, so you don't need to bring your own laptop. However, if you wish to use your Mac laptop, please make sure you preload it  with the latest version of NVivo. You can download NVivo and the license key with your SFU computing ID by using the self-serve download link here. If you are unable to get past the authentication page, then please email nvivo-rc@sfu.ca.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Tuesday, July 9, 2019 - 10:00am to 11:30am Surrey, Galleria 3, Lab 3050

R (Software)

Introduction to R (2-day workshop)

This two day workshop introduces the programming language R.  R is an open-source, widely used, and increasingly popular tool for statistical and data analyses, text mining, geospatial analysis, modelling, and a growing number of other applications. No prior knowledge is required. Students will learn the skills needed to start analyzing their own data.

The topics covered include:

  • the R environment (directories, workspace, scripts, and packages),
  • simple commands to get you started,
  • data structures (vector, matrix, data frames, lists),
  • basic data analysis tools (built-in statistical packages, plotting, etc.)

 As time permits, an introduction to functions may also be covered.

Requirements:

  • Participants need to bring a laptop with the latest versions of R and RStudio installed.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Thursday, May 16, 2019 - 9:30am to 4:30pm
Friday, May 17, 2019 - 9:30am to 4:30pm
Burnaby, SFU's Big Data Hub (Applied Science Building - Flexible Meeting Room ASB 10908)

Use dplyr to effectively handle data in R

This workshop for intermediate R users will show you how to leverage dplyr (a package in tidyverse) to more effectively filter, transform, and aggregate your data. If you've used R before, then you know that getting base R to transform data into a form needed for your analysis is usually a challenge, with complex blocks of code to perform what should be simple operations. Luckily for us, dplyr is designed to help easily express these operations so that what is essentially a simple data transformation only requires simple code.
 
This workshop assumes that you are already comfortable in base R. For example, you should be able to: 
  • Import data from a CSV or text file 
  • Extract and create columns in a data frame, and filter rows according to different conditions 
  • Write an R script that can run on its own without manual user intervention.

By the end of the workshop you will be able to: 

  • Use the primary dplyr functions for selecting, mutating, filtering, summarizing, and re-ordering data 
  • Recognize existing complicated base R code blocks and simplify them down using dplyr 
  • Use tidyr (a tidyverse package) to easily reshape data both to and from long and wide formats. 

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Wednesday, May 22, 2019 - 1:30pm to 4:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

Introduction to Social Network Analysis with R

Social Network Analysis is to visualize and analyze data from a social network like Twitter or Facebook. If you're involved in analytics in any capacity, this course will be a huge help, teaching you how the R SNA and igraph modules works and how to format data for analysis, create graphs, analyze network graphs, and visualize networks.
 
Requirements:
  • Basic knowledge of R programming, but no knowledge of social network analysis required.
  • Please make sure you have the most recent version of R and RStudio installed on your computer.

-------------------

Note: This workshop is organized and facilitated by SciProg. SciProg—short for Scientific Programming Study Group—is dedicated to building a community of SFU researchers who perform computational data analysis as part of their academic work. SciProg promotes skill sharing and collaboration by (1) organizing 60 to 90-minute interactive workshops covering a wide range of software tools, (2) providing Q&A sessions for peer-to-peer assistance and collaboration, and (3) bringing researchers together at social events like Hacky Hours.

 

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Friday, June 7, 2019 - 1:30pm to 3:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

Introduction to R for Non-Science Majors (2-day workshop)

This workshop is designed for non-science students interested in the statistical computing program R. No prior knowledge of R is required. Often data outside of the sciences includes textual data, such as a corpus or series of surveys. In this workshop we’ll learn how to process textual data in R, as well as the basic skills to start analyzing it. Specific topics covered include the R environment (directories, workspace, scripts, and packages), data structures (vector, matrix, data frames, lists), and the beginnings of simple data analysis (built-in statistical packages, elementary statistics, etc.).

Note: Workshop participants will need to bring their own laptops, with R and RStudio installed prior to attending the workshop.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Saturday, June 15, 2019 - 9:30am to 4:30pm
Sunday, June 16, 2019 - 9:30am to 4:30pm
Burnaby, SFU's Big Data Hub (Applied Science Building - Flexible Meeting Room ASB 10908)

Web Scraping in R

Growing amount of data is available over the web. However, this data is usually presented in an unstructured HTML format which poses a challenge to researchers who want to automatically capture the data and convert it into a form appropriate for analysis. Web scraping is a computational method that offers means to meet such challenges. In this workshop you will learn how to scrape unstructured web pages using rvest R package and prepare the captured data for analysis. You will gain some hands-on experience working on a few small projects that underlie common scraping strategies/issues. The last project will include scraping of multiple web pages.

Prerequisites: Functional knowledge of commonly used base R commands (for an overview see https://www.rstudio.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/base-r.pdf).

Note: Workshop participants will need to bring their own laptops, with R and RStudio installed prior to attending the workshop.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Thursday, June 20, 2019 - 10:00am to 4:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

Text Mining in R

Text mining techniques can be applied to various data sources (e.g., newspaper articles, emails, online discussion posts, etc.) to efficiently extract useful data for different research purposes. For example, health science researchers may be interested in investigating a frequency of a particular disease name mentioned in a large set of newspaper articles. Educational researchers, on the other side, may wish to extract and categorize students' opinions from discussion forum in a high enrollment course. R offers a comprehensive set of functionalities for text mining. In this workshop, you will learn how to implement basic methods for preprocessing textual data, metadata management, a creation of term-document matrices over the collection of textual documents, sentiment analysis, text tokenization, word relationship extraction and text visualization.

Note: Workshop participants will need to bring their own laptops, with R and RStudio installed prior to attending the workshop.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Thursday, June 27, 2019 - 10:00am to 4:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

Statistics

Next semester's workshops will be posted soon.

Visual Analytics

Data visualization with Tableau: The painless, programming-free way to build charts and graphs

Tableau is a data visualization tool that can help you analyze your data and illustrate the patterns and insights behind them. This interactive workshop will introduce researchers to Tableau Public, a free access version of Tableau.

You will leave this workshop with an understanding of how to:
  • connect datasets to your Tableau workbook;
  • create a variety of basic chart types (including bar charts, line graphs, and maps);
  • use Tableau's built-in analysis features, like reference lines, trend lines and calculated fields; and
  • publish and share publication-quality interactive charts and graphs.
Requirements: Participants will need to bring their own laptop and charger. Before the workshop, please download and install the latest version of Tableau Public to your laptop.
 
Notes: 

 

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Wednesday, June 26, 2019 - 12:00pm to 5:00pm Vancouver, Harbour Centre, Rm 7400

An Introduction to Using Tableau for Data Visualization

Tableau is a data visualization tool that is being used to help analyze data and illustrate the patterns and insights behind them. This interactive workshop will introduce researchers or students to Tableau Public, a free access version of Tableau.

Requirements:

  • No prior experience with Tableau is necessary.
  • Participants will need to bring their own laptop preloaded with the latest version of Tableau Public

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Thursday, July 11, 2019 - 10:00am to 12:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

Scholarly communication

Preparing to Publish

Graduate students are always encouraged to publish but often without really knowing what that means or how to start. This workshop will focus on navigating the peer review process and will also touch on the topics of open access, working with an editor, and co-authorship.  It will include a discussion of copyright transfer agreements and licenses and provide insight into publishing venues for assuring your research has the best possible visibility, accessibility, and impact.

A few questions this session will help to answer:

  • How does the publishing cycle work?
  • How can you assess potential publishing venues?
  • What is peer review and how can you respond to reviewer comments?
  • What rights can you retain to your published research?
  • What are predatory publishers and how can you avoid them?

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Saturday, May 25, 2019 - 2:00pm to 4:00pm Vancouver, Harbour Centre, Rm 1600

Publishing Symposium

Are you interested in publishing your academic work, extending the reach of your research, and developing your online presence? The day includes three workshops which will give you everything you need to prepare to publish and share the word about your research.

Preparing to Publish
This workshop will focus on navigating the peer review process and will also touch on the topics of open access, working with an editor, and co-authorship.  It will include a discussion of copyright transfer agreements and licenses and provide insight into publishing venues for assuring your research has the best possible visibility, accessibility, and impact.

Who is looking at your research and how can you measure it?
Find out more about research impact – what it is, how to measure it and how to leverage it.

Raising Your Online Research Profile
This workshop will look at the big picture and context for developing your online academic narrative: why do you want a research profile? How do you get your work out there? The workshop will provide a hands-on introduction to tools for privacy, social media, and auditing and building your online academic portfolio.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Friday, June 21, 2019 - 10:00am to 4:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

Make Waves: Raise Your Research Profile

Are you looking to raise the profile and impact of your research? If you have a thoughtful, curated, and professional academic profile, your research is more likely to be found, read, discussed, and shared online. Building your online research profile can connect your research with relevant communities and increase uptake and application of your work. Bring your laptop to this facilitated drop-in session. Librarians will be available to support you with any of the following:

  • Depositing your work to Summit, SFU's Research Repository
  • Creating, updating or refining your online profiles in ORCID, Google Scholar, or ImpactStory
  • Leveraging #AcademicTwitter
  • Discussing options for going public with your work
  • Developing strategies for building or enhancing your personal website to host your online bio and CV

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Wednesday, July 24, 2019 - 12:00pm to 3:00pm Vancouver, Harbour Centre, Rm 7400

Writing

Graduate Open Writing Lab: Write Time, Write Space (drop-in)

The Graduate Open Writing Lab is for all graduate students who want the time and a quiet, dedicated space to work on their writing. A Graduate Writing Facilitator will be available for consultations and to answer questions.

Registration not required - please drop in!

Summer Semester 2019 [May 6 to August 19]

Burnaby Campus
Graduate Open Writing Lab  - Mondays, 2:00 pm to 4:30 pm, SFU Burnaby, W.A.C. Bennett Library, Research Commons, Rm 7010
(no sessions on May 20, July 1 and August 5)

Vancouver Campus
Graduate Open Writing Lab - Fridays, 11:30 am to 2:30 pm, SFU Vancouver, Harbour Centre - Room HC 7400*
*May 10, it will take place in Room HC 1425, from 1:30pm to 4:30pm as part of Summer Writing and Research Spectacular

Writing Workshops

Please register for the following writing workshops:

Practical Tips for Writing and Surviving Your Thesis

In this workshop, Dr. Ken Lertzman discusses common challenges faced by students in completing their thesis. These include
various issues in the writing process and broader issues related to project management and strategy. He concludes with a
number of points about writing mechanics. Learn techniques to help restore direction, and bring motivation and excitement to
this phase of your graduate research.

Facilitator:
Dr. Ken Lertzman, Professor | School of Resource and Environmental Management

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Tuesday, April 30, 2019 - 10:00am to 11:30am Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

Write Conversations: The Work We Do Prior to Writing: Planning, Outlining, and Strategies for Starting

Writing shorter pieces was just so much simpler. Now that we are working on longer pieces like graduate term papers, articles, capstone projects, and theses, the writing process has become longer and more complex. Join our conversation about conceptualizing the steps involved in writing longer works, and how certain planning and outlining strategies can help you get started. Getting started sounds simple enough… until it’s time to do it!

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Monday, May 6, 2019 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

Sketching Your Summer 2019 Writing Road Map

In this power-charged mini-workshop, facilitators will help students establish clear writing goals and plans of action to achieve them over the summer. Key topics will be making a realistic schedule, crafting benchmarks to assess your progress, foreseeing and planning for potential challenges or road blocks, and providing a structured path through the seemingly abstract, amorphous journey of thesis writing!

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Friday, May 10, 2019 - 10:00am to 10:45am Vancouver, Harbour Centre, Rm 1425

Level Up! Tips and Tricks for Research Productivity

Learn how to keep up with research! In this workshop, we'll go over tips and tricks that can save you time during your research, including setting search and citation alerts, forward chaining, software tools to help with writing reference lists and literature reviews, and more.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Friday, May 10, 2019 - 11:00am to 11:30am Vancouver, Harbour Centre, Rm 1425

Key Strategies for Staying the Course (Procrastinate Later!)

After having constructed a clear path forward in the earlier workshop, now it’s time to talk about how to stay on track! Here we’ll discuss strategies for self-discipline, time-management, and tackling pervasive pitfalls like procrastination, distraction, and working in a communication void. We’ll also suggest strategic ways of using Research Commons’ spaces and services to help you meet your summer 2019 goals!

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Friday, May 10, 2019 - 11:45am to 12:30pm Vancouver, Harbour Centre, Rm 1425

Write Conversations: Open topic (free for all)

Have some burning writing questions? Need to get something off your chest? These open topic Write Conversations discussions are an opportunity to have a free flowing conversation about writing with your peers and a Graduate Writing Facilitator.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Monday, May 13, 2019 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons
Friday, May 31, 2019 - 10:30am to 11:30am Vancouver, Harbour Centre, Rm 7400
Friday, June 21, 2019 - 10:30am to 11:30am Vancouver, Harbour Centre, Rm 7400
Monday, July 8, 2019 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons
Friday, August 2, 2019 - 10:30am to 11:30am Vancouver, Harbour Centre, Rm 7400

Write Conversations: Concision: Less is More

Drowning in words? Get to the point. Say more with less. We'll review how to recognize and cut wordiness and redundancy. By applying these strategies, you'll see immediate improvements in sentence clarity!

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Friday, May 17, 2019 - 10:30am to 11:30am Vancouver, Harbour Centre, Rm 7400
Monday, June 3, 2019 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

Write Conversations: Overcoming procrastination and developing a writing habit

Join us for a conversation about all those things that keep us from writing. We will also discuss some practical strategies for building writing into your life so that it becomes a regular practice.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Friday, May 24, 2019 - 10:30am to 11:30am Vancouver, Harbour Centre, Rm 7400
Monday, June 10, 2019 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

Writing and Researching Your Literature Review

This interactive workshop focuses on the literature review and literature search. At this session you will learn:

  • conventions of literature reviews,
  • search strategies,
  • advanced features of research databases,
  • and tips to further develop effective and efficient research skills.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Saturday, May 25, 2019 - 11:30am to 1:30pm Vancouver, Harbour Centre, Rm 1600

Preparing to Publish

Graduate students are always encouraged to publish but often without really knowing what that means or how to start. This workshop will focus on navigating the peer review process and will also touch on the topics of open access, working with an editor, and co-authorship.  It will include a discussion of copyright transfer agreements and licenses and provide insight into publishing venues for assuring your research has the best possible visibility, accessibility, and impact.

A few questions this session will help to answer:

  • How does the publishing cycle work?
  • How can you assess potential publishing venues?
  • What is peer review and how can you respond to reviewer comments?
  • What rights can you retain to your published research?
  • What are predatory publishers and how can you avoid them?

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Saturday, May 25, 2019 - 2:00pm to 4:00pm Vancouver, Harbour Centre, Rm 1600

Write Conversations: Managing Writing Anxiety

Being anxious about academic writing can lead to unhelpful writing habits like avoidance and procrastination. Join us for a discussion on how to make more progress by alleviating writing anxiety!

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Monday, May 27, 2019 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

Write Conversations: Everything in 250 words or less: Writing abstracts

Wondering how you can put all of that crucial information about your research into just one paragraph? Join today’s discussion for some tips to master this pesky task that follows so much of our hard work. Even 250 words can make a difference in selling your potential audience on the value of your research!

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Friday, June 7, 2019 - 10:30am to 11:30am Vancouver, Harbour Centre, Rm 7400

Write Conversations: Transition Words and How to Use Them

Are you getting feedback that your writing is “choppy”? Are you overusing certain transitional words and phrases like “however” or “on the other hand”? Join today’s discussion on how to use transitions thoughtfully so that your reader can comprehend your writing with ease and clarity.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Friday, June 14, 2019 - 10:30am to 11:30am Vancouver, Harbour Centre, Rm 7400

Write Conversations: What is a Literature Review?

Believe it or not, it’s not just a long summary of relevant literature. Your literature review serves many purposes including improving your research, focusing your thesis or project, and perhaps most importantly, aptly demonstrating your new-found expertise to your reader while providing a strong first impression for your final written product.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Monday, June 17, 2019 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons
Friday, July 12, 2019 - 10:30am to 11:30am Vancouver, Harbour Centre, Rm 7400

Write Conversations: "Your reader is a little bit drunk": Writing Clearly for an Audience of Sleep-Deprived Academics

Today’s informal workshop borrows its name from a 2018 University Affairs article with the same title, written by Letitia Henville. Writing for an audience of academics has unique benefits and challenges: these individuals are intelligent, willing to read, and might even have high interest in your topic, but they are also indescribably busy, likely sleep-deprived, and are juggling a multitude of priorities. Join us today for some tips on how to get your message across to readers whose demanding schedules might leave them feeling a bit intoxicated by the time they open your file!

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Monday, June 24, 2019 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

Write Conversations: Getting the feedback you need and applying it

Our professors’ feedback can be one of the most valuable tools we receive as graduate students, leading to deeply meaningful change in our thinking and writing – if we can figure out what to do with it! Don’t let those teachable moments go to waste. Let’s talk about how we can improve incorporating (and accepting) others’ feedback into our writing process.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Friday, June 28, 2019 - 10:30am to 11:30am Vancouver, Harbour Centre, Rm 7400
Monday, July 15, 2019 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

Write Conversations: Don't Plagiarize: Understanding how to Paraphrase

Learning how to accurately and skillfully use our own words to describe other scholar’s ideas remains a challenging process for many graduate students, and understandably so. While practicing and improving paraphrasing is guaranteed to level-up your writing, doing so without plagiarizing can and should be an ongoing concern. Come to this discussion to learn more about that foreboding beast "plagiarism," and its lesser known version "patch writing," so that you are better able to both spot it in students' writing and avoid it in your own.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Friday, July 5, 2019 - 10:30am to 11:30am Vancouver, Harbour Centre, Rm 7400

Write Conversations: Lay Language

Lay language is needed in order to convey technical and advanced ideas in ways that are more effective than “dumbing it down”. You may be preparing a grant or fellowship proposal, writing for online purposes or fine tuning your “job talk”— all of which require you to translate your work and research to persons outside of your core field of study.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Friday, July 19, 2019 - 10:30am to 11:30am Vancouver, Harbour Centre, Rm 7400
Monday, July 22, 2019 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

Write Conversations: The Home Stretch: Revising and Proofreading

Knowing when to revise, what to look for, and when it's time to proofread will help you edit your own writing more effectively.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Friday, July 26, 2019 - 10:30am to 11:30am Vancouver, Harbour Centre, Rm 7400
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

Thesis

Hands-on with the Library Thesis Word Template

The SFU Library thesis template is a Microsoft Word file designed to assist students in preparing theses, projects, and extended essays. The template uses custom styles to ensure that your document  conforms to SFU-specific formatting standards and acceptable for Library submission.

This hands-on workshop will cover:

  • the structure of the SFU Library thesis/project/extended essays
  • styles: what Word styles are, the organization of the Library thesis template styles and how to apply the styles
  • how to insert tables, figures/images, auto-numbered captions and notes
  • how to generate and update the Table of Contents, List of Tables and List of Figures
Requirements: Participants will need to bring their own laptop (either Mac or PC) with Microsoft Word installed. Note: the template has been tested with the following versions of MS Word: Word 2011 (Mac), Word 2013 (Windows), and Word 2016/365 (Windows and Mac), so it is advisable not have anything older than these versions.
 
Working Files: Closer to the workshop date, necessary working files will be emailed to all registrants.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Saturday, May 25, 2019 - 2:00pm to 4:00pm Vancouver, Harbour Centre, Rm 1530

Hands-On with the Library’s Thesis Word Template: Open Lab

Bring your laptop (either PC or Mac), your document(s), and your questions to this open lab session to get some hands-on, practical help and suggestions with the Library’s thesis template. Join the Library’s support staff anytime during the open lab to learn how to:

  • populate the Table of Contents so that chapter headings and subheadings automatically show up with the correct pagination
  • insert table or figure/image captions so that they are auto-numbered and automatically populated into the List of Tables & List of Figures sections of your document
  • fine-tune the formatting of your tables
  • create very large tables to fit onto a landscape or tabloid (11x17) page
  • apply appropriate styles to make your thesis look consistent, professional and acceptable for Library submission and publication
  • other formatting tips & tricks

Please register so that we know you’re coming.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Wednesday, May 22, 2019 - 1:00pm to 3:30pm Vancouver, Harbour Centre, Rm 7400
Wednesday, June 12, 2019 - 1:00pm to 3:30pm Vancouver, Harbour Centre, Rm 7400
Wednesday, July 17, 2019 - 1:00pm to 3:30pm Vancouver, Harbour Centre, Rm 7400
Wednesday, August 14, 2019 - 1:00pm to 3:30pm Vancouver, Harbour Centre, Rm 7400

Practical Tips for Writing and Surviving Your Thesis

In this workshop, Dr. Ken Lertzman discusses common challenges faced by students in completing their thesis. These include
various issues in the writing process and broader issues related to project management and strategy. He concludes with a
number of points about writing mechanics. Learn techniques to help restore direction, and bring motivation and excitement to
this phase of your graduate research.

Facilitator:
Dr. Ken Lertzman, Professor | School of Resource and Environmental Management

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Tuesday, April 30, 2019 - 10:00am to 11:30am Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

Thesis template and resources: How to use it and where to find help

This demonstration introduces you to the Thesis Assistance wepageThesis Submission process and the Thesis Template. This workshop will be broken down into four parts:

  1. It will begin with an introduction to required copyright permissions from the Copyright Office at SFU. (about 30 minutes)
  2. SFU Library's research data specialists will give instruction on how to preserve and, if appropriate, share research data for future uses. (about 15 minutes)
  3. The Theses Office will provide an overview of the Thesis Assistant website and go over the overall submission process (including deadlines and supporting documentation). (about 30 to 40 minutes)
  4. The technical part of the workshop will follow, where you will be walked through the overall structure of your thesis and the functionality of the thesis template. (about 30 to 40 minutes)

Students are encouraged to bring their own computer and thesis document(s) to work along with the facilitator during the workshop.

Learn how to:

  • request copyright permissions (if your thesis includes reproductions of copyright protected images, including  figures, drawings, paintings, photographs, logos, maps, diagrams, tables or charts, and even screen captures on the web, then you might need to request copyright permission)
  • write in the MS Word template-based file
  • format your text using styles
  • bring text in from other documents
  • insert figures, images, and auto-numbered captions
  • generate the Table of Contents, List of Tables, List of Figures, etc.

If you’ve begun writing, send your document to theses@sfu.ca in advance of the workshop; one might be used in demonstrating the Library’s thesis template. After the session, the formatted document will be returned in which the student can continue his/her work.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Tuesday, April 30, 2019 - 1:00pm to 2:15pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons
Tuesday, May 14, 2019 - 10:30am to 12:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons
Wednesday, June 19, 2019 - 1:30pm to 3:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons
Thursday, July 11, 2019 - 10:30am to 12:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons
Tuesday, August 13, 2019 - 1:30pm to 3:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons