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Research Commons: Workshops for graduate students & postdoctoral fellows

 

During COVID-19, Research Commons' services continue.

SFU graduate students are encouraged to book consultations with the Research Commons staff and partners. Consultations are available by phone, via email, or through online video-conference.

Not finding what you're looking for? Please get in touch with us at research-commons@sfu.ca so we can discuss your research support needs. 

 

The Research Commons is pleased to offer you a range of workshops, developed in the context of SFU Library's Instruction Strategy. You can register for upcoming workshops and search by workshop date in our workshops calendar.

If you do not see the topic(s) you are interested in and/or would like a specialized workshop for yourself and a group of colleagues, please send a request to research-commons@sfu.ca.

SFU values diversity and is committed to inclusion. If you require any disability-related accommodations in order to fully access and participate in our workshops and/or events, please contact us directly at library-workshops@sfu.ca. All communication will be kept confidential. Please contact us as early as possible as some accommodations will require lead time to arrange (i.e. CART, ASL)

Digital Humanities workshops

Intro to Digital Humanities Tools [Online]

This workshop will explore some of the tools available for analyzing and presenting different kinds of data once it has been collected. It will provide an introduction to some of the free and easy-to-learn online tools available and ideas for how to integrate them into both research projects and the classroom. In this workshop, we will explore:

  • How to use Palladio to integrate geographical data with text, images, and multimedia content to create beautiful and intuitive interactive maps;
  • How to curate digital exhibits using Scalar
  • How to use Voyant for text analysis and visualization

Register for upcoming workshops

Dates Location
Thursday, June 11, 2020 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

Using Palladio for Social Network Analysis [Online]

Palladio, developed by Stanford’s Humanities + Design Lab, is a web-based visualization tool for complex humanities data. A super easy-to-use tool, it can be particularly good for beginners to social network analysis.  This workshop will contextualize the exploration of Palladio within an intellectual inquiry–what drove the inquiry and what emerged from the data as a result of deep engagement of the visualization.  Specifically, the workshop will cover: 

  1. Introduction to Palladio 
  2. Example: using the Chinese Head Tax data to visualize historical migration patterns 
  3. The caveats behind Palladio's ease of use 

*It's not necessary to have knowledge about social network analysis. 

Register for upcoming workshops

Dates Location
Tuesday, June 23, 2020 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

Beyond the Cloud: Using Voyant Tools to Analyze Texts [Online]

Digital tools for text analysis can help humanities researchers see and query their data in new ways through word frequency, patterns, and context. However, while a word cloud might seem to offer straightforward information about textual data, researchers may wonder how, why, and when to best to utilize these tools. This workshop will offer an introduction to Voyant - free, online software that creates visualizations of text - and to digital text analysis more broadly. We will discuss the different kinds of textual data that are optimal for digital text analysis, and explore several of Voyant’s functions that may be of interest to humanities scholars.

Register for upcoming workshops

Dates Location
Tuesday, June 30, 2020 - 1:00pm to 3:00pm via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

Introduction to the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI): What is it and why should I care? [Online]

The Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) is the de facto standard for digitizing and enriching textual materials. An XML encoding language, the TEI offers a robust, multi-lingual vocabulary for describing, analyzing, preserving, and publishing “texts” across various genres: poems, drama, manuscripts, tombstones, posters, audio recordings, music videos, et cetera.

This workshop will serve as an introduction to the TEI as an encoding language, outlining how individuals can use the TEI in their own research projects. No prior experience with markup language, text encoding, or the digital humanities is needed. By the end of this workshop, participants will understand why it is that so many digital humanities resources—including Early English Books Online (EEBO), Eighteenth Century Collections Online, and the Women Writers Project—use TEI to enrich their digital archives and what the scholarly and technical affordances are of using the TEI. This workshop will also provide participants tangible tools for taking up the TEI for their own purposes and outline how participants leverage the mechanisms of the TEI within their own work.

Register for upcoming workshops

Dates Location
Tuesday, July 7, 2020 - 1:00pm to 2:30pm via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

Introduction to Spatial Data in Humanities: The Spatial Elements of Textual Analysis [Online]

Many humanities researchers have some form of geographical information included in their research, such as objects, images, or texts from or about a particular place; narratives about a person’s movement or a place’s change over time; or information about networks of people or organizations. Whether places and spaces are at the heart of your research or are a part of it, mapping can help answer research questions and generate new ones by visualizing your data in new ways. It can help tell a story about place or space. This two-part workshop series will help humanities researchers map their place-based research with ArcGIS.

The Spatial Elements of Textual Analysis
The first workshop will cover the nuts and bolts of getting started mapping with ArcGIS. We will discuss how to extract data from your research, get it ready for analysis, and upload it into ArcGIS. The workshop will help humanities researchers explore and map the spatial elements of their research with ArcGIS.

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • extract data from their research;
  • get their data ready for spatial analysis;
  • upload data into ArcGIS Online;
  • use some basic mapping techniques with ArcGIS Online.

Software: ArcGIS Online

Workshop page (SFU Canvas): GIS workshops page includes workshop descriptions and suggested streams for different disciplines, handouts, slides, and example datasets

Creating Story Maps
The second workshop will cover spatial analysis - the potential applications of your geographic information. We will demonstrate the analytic functions included in ArcGIS and discuss how to create context for your spatial data. We will also introduce Story Maps, an app that helps turn place-based information into narratives with a combination of maps, images, and text. Note: for this workshop, we will assume that you have already attended the first workshop or are comfortable with the material covered there.

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • create a Story Map;
  • extract spatial context from text.

Register for upcoming workshops

Dates Location
Tuesday, July 21, 2020 - 10:00am to 12:00pm via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

Introduction to Spatial Data in Humanities: Creating Story Maps [Online]

Many humanities researchers have some form of geographical information included in their research, such as objects, images, or texts from or about a particular place; narratives about a person’s movement or a place’s change over time; or information about networks of people or organizations. Whether places and spaces are at the heart of your research or are a part of it, mapping can help answer research questions and generate new ones by visualizing your data in new ways. It can help tell a story about place or space. This two-part workshop series will help humanities researchers map their place-based research with ArcGIS.

The Spatial Elements of Textual Analysis
The first workshop will cover the nuts and bolts of getting started mapping with ArcGIS. We will discuss how to extract data from your research, get it ready for analysis, and upload it into ArcGIS. The workshop will help humanities researchers explore and map the spatial elements of their research with ArcGIS.

Software: ArcGIS Online (participants will not need their own computer)

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • extract data from their research;
  • get their data ready for spatial analysis;
  • upload data into ArcGIS Online;
  • use some basic mapping techniques with ArcGIS Online.

Creating Story Maps
The second workshop will cover spatial analysis - the potential applications of your geographic information. We will demonstrate the analytic functions included in ArcGIS and discuss how to create context for your spatial data. We will also introduce Story Maps, an app that helps turn place-based information into narratives with a combination of maps, images, and text. Note: for this workshop, we will assume that you have already attended the first workshop or are comfortable with the material covered there.

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • create a Story Map;
  • extract spatial context from text.

Software: ArcGIS Online

Workshop page (SFU Canvas): GIS workshops page includes workshop descriptions and suggested streams for different disciplines, handouts, slides, and example datasets

    Register for upcoming workshops

    Dates Location
    Tuesday, July 28, 2020 - 10:00am to 12:00pm via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

    R for Literature Scholars [Online]

    Computational analysis, also known as distant reading, provides access to information or insights about a text that would be nearly impossible to gather using methods of close reading and “manual” synthesis. This workshop is based on Matthew Jockers’ book “Text Analysis with R for Students of Literature”. We will provide an introduction to computational text analysis using the programming language R and look at 1-2 analysis techniques based on word frequency. 

    Requirements:

    • this workshop is for beginners;
    • a computer with latest version of R and RStudio installed in advance of the workshop

    Register for upcoming workshops

    Dates Location
    Thursday, August 6, 2020 - 9:00am to 12:00pm via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

    English as an Additional Language (EAL) workshops

    Academic Writing for Graduate Students

    This seminar-style workshop series is designed for graduate students for whom English is an additional language (EAL). The workshop focuses on writing tasks that may be required in the earlier stages of a graduate program.  You will learn how to apply your analytical skills to the discourses of your chosen disciplines and explore how effective academic writing in Western scholarly tradition is achieved in order to position yourself as junior scholars in your chosen academic communities. Students will complete several reading, writing, and grammar tasks, all of which will be used to provide personalized feedback.

    Required textbook:

    Swales, John M., & Feak, Christine B. (2011). Academic Writing for Graduate Students: Essential Tasks and Skills (3rd Edition). Ann Arbor: U of Michigan Press (ISBN: 978-0472-03475-8).

    Register for upcoming workshops

    Dates Location
    Wednesday, May 13, 2020 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Wednesday, May 20, 2020 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Wednesday, May 27, 2020 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Wednesday, June 3, 2020 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Wednesday, June 10, 2020 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Wednesday, June 17, 2020 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Wednesday, June 24, 2020 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Wednesday, July 8, 2020 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Wednesday, July 15, 2020 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Wednesday, July 22, 2020 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Webinar

    Learning workshops

    Next semester's workshops will be posted soon.

    Research data management workshops

    For assistance with research data management, including help with SFU's Research Data Repository Radar, please contact data-services@sfu.ca.

    Introduction to Git and Version Control (2-day workshop) [Online]

     
    Note: This is an online workshop (via Zoom). The workshop has been split into two 2-hour sessions, and will be run on successive days. In order to attend the 2nd day, you are required to attend the 1st day.
     
    ------------------
     
    In this beginner's introduction to Git you will learn the basics of working with Git version control. We will start with an overview of Git and version controlling concepts. Making our own repository, we will practice creating a remote repository, cloning, branching and resolving conflicts on a Git project.
     
    Requirements:
    • You need to have Git bash installed on your computer. We will not be using GitHub, so no need for a GitHub account.
    • You need a remote secure shell (SSH) client installed:
      • If you are on a Mac or Linux laptop, you already have it installed.
      • If you are on Windows and don't have SSH installed (or don't know what it is), we recommend you install Ubuntu on your windows OS before the workshop. We will guide you through installing SSH before the class. 
    • We assume no previous knowledge of the Linux command line or version control.

    Register for upcoming workshops

    Dates Location
    Tuesday, June 2, 2020 - 10:00am to 12:00pm
    Wednesday, June 3, 2020 - 10:00am to 12:00pm
    via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

    Research programming 

    Next semester's workshops will be posted soon.

    Research software workshops

    Citation Management

    Cite your sources easier and faster with Zotero [Online]

    Want to make your research and writing more efficient? Hate the last minute rush of trying to create a correctly formatted bibliography? This workshop is for you! We will introduce Zotero, a citation management tool that can help you import, organize, share, and manage your citations and documents, as well as create correctly formatted in-text citations and bibliographies in almost any style -- in seconds.

    Note: In advance of the workshop, participants should: register for a Zotero account and download and install Zotero 5.0.

    Register for upcoming workshops

    Dates Location
    Friday, June 5, 2020 - 10:00am to 11:00am via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)
    Tuesday, June 16, 2020 - 2:00pm to 3:00pm via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)
    Thursday, July 9, 2020 - 10:00am to 11:00am via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

    GIS

    Introduction to Spatial Thinking and ArcGIS Online [Online]

    • What is the travel route of the Anna's hummingbird (Calypte anna)? Does it pass close to areas where predators are present, specifically those which prey on eggs?

    • Are neighbourhoods with low socioeconomic status spatially correlated to high morbidity rates?

    • Or, a more pressing question, to what extent has mobility changed due to social distancing interventions against COVID-19?

    Many of these questions ask about the spatial relationship between two or more phenomena. This workshop is an introduction to spatial thinking and the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). This workshop assumes attendees have no previous experience with GIS.

    Software

    ArcGIS Online. You do not need to install any software but need to send email to gis-software@sfu.ca to request an ArcGIS online account if you wish to participate the hands-on part.

    Learning outcomes

    By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

    • think spatially about their research;
    • understand the elements of GIS;
    • use a web-based GIS environment (ArcGIS Online)
    • create simple maps using geospatial data;
    • look for and find geospatial data and resources.  

    Core competencies
    finding and using spatial data, projections, spatial thinking, map essentials

    Register for upcoming workshops

    Dates Location
    Tuesday, May 26, 2020 - 10:00am to 12:00pm via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)
    Tuesday, July 14, 2020 - 10:00am to 12:00pm via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

    Introduction to QGIS [Online]

    GIS software doesn’t have to be expensive! QGIS is a free, open source GIS platform with powerful tools and wide variety of plugins. Learn how to use the basic tools in QGIS for your spatial projects. 

    Learning Outcomes: By the end of this workshop you will be able to:

    • Import data to and export data from QGIS
    • Edit data within QGIS
    • Do basic vector analysis in QGIS
    • Do basic raster analysis in QGIS
    • Export simple maps using the layout manager

    Software: Please install QGIS on your computer beforehand. QGIS is available on Windows, macOS, Linux and Android.

    Core Competencies: vector analysis, raster analysis, data management

     

    Register for upcoming workshops

    Dates Location
    Tuesday, June 16, 2020 - 10:00am to 12:00pm via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

    Making Great Maps [Online]

    Making a map isn’t difficult, but making a visually appealing map is much harder. A bad map is difficult to understand, and makes viewers more likely to ignore it entirely. A beautiful map will not only better communicate your ideas, but can transform an average poster, paper, or presentation into a great one.

    Learning Outcomes: By the end of this workshop you will be able to:

    • Import data into QGIS
    • Find and use custom base maps
    • Understand the elements of good cartographic design
    • Use QGIS map layouts to make maps faster and more consistently
    • Export maps for publication

    Software:

    Please install QGIS, a free and open source GIS platform, on your computer beforehand. QGIS is available on Windows, macOS, Linux and Android.

    Core Competencies: cartography, map layout, basemaps

    Register for upcoming workshops

    Dates Location
    Tuesday, June 30, 2020 - 10:00am to 12:00pm via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

    Introduction to Spatial Data in Humanities: The Spatial Elements of Textual Analysis [Online]

    Many humanities researchers have some form of geographical information included in their research, such as objects, images, or texts from or about a particular place; narratives about a person’s movement or a place’s change over time; or information about networks of people or organizations. Whether places and spaces are at the heart of your research or are a part of it, mapping can help answer research questions and generate new ones by visualizing your data in new ways. It can help tell a story about place or space. This two-part workshop series will help humanities researchers map their place-based research with ArcGIS.

    The Spatial Elements of Textual Analysis
    The first workshop will cover the nuts and bolts of getting started mapping with ArcGIS. We will discuss how to extract data from your research, get it ready for analysis, and upload it into ArcGIS. The workshop will help humanities researchers explore and map the spatial elements of their research with ArcGIS.

    By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

    • extract data from their research;
    • get their data ready for spatial analysis;
    • upload data into ArcGIS Online;
    • use some basic mapping techniques with ArcGIS Online.

    Software: ArcGIS Online

    Workshop page (SFU Canvas): GIS workshops page includes workshop descriptions and suggested streams for different disciplines, handouts, slides, and example datasets

    Creating Story Maps
    The second workshop will cover spatial analysis - the potential applications of your geographic information. We will demonstrate the analytic functions included in ArcGIS and discuss how to create context for your spatial data. We will also introduce Story Maps, an app that helps turn place-based information into narratives with a combination of maps, images, and text. Note: for this workshop, we will assume that you have already attended the first workshop or are comfortable with the material covered there.

    By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

    • create a Story Map;
    • extract spatial context from text.

    Register for upcoming workshops

    Dates Location
    Tuesday, July 21, 2020 - 10:00am to 12:00pm via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

    Introduction to Spatial Data in Humanities: Creating Story Maps [Online]

    Many humanities researchers have some form of geographical information included in their research, such as objects, images, or texts from or about a particular place; narratives about a person’s movement or a place’s change over time; or information about networks of people or organizations. Whether places and spaces are at the heart of your research or are a part of it, mapping can help answer research questions and generate new ones by visualizing your data in new ways. It can help tell a story about place or space. This two-part workshop series will help humanities researchers map their place-based research with ArcGIS.

    The Spatial Elements of Textual Analysis
    The first workshop will cover the nuts and bolts of getting started mapping with ArcGIS. We will discuss how to extract data from your research, get it ready for analysis, and upload it into ArcGIS. The workshop will help humanities researchers explore and map the spatial elements of their research with ArcGIS.

    Software: ArcGIS Online (participants will not need their own computer)

    By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

    • extract data from their research;
    • get their data ready for spatial analysis;
    • upload data into ArcGIS Online;
    • use some basic mapping techniques with ArcGIS Online.

    Creating Story Maps
    The second workshop will cover spatial analysis - the potential applications of your geographic information. We will demonstrate the analytic functions included in ArcGIS and discuss how to create context for your spatial data. We will also introduce Story Maps, an app that helps turn place-based information into narratives with a combination of maps, images, and text. Note: for this workshop, we will assume that you have already attended the first workshop or are comfortable with the material covered there.

    By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

    • create a Story Map;
    • extract spatial context from text.

    Software: ArcGIS Online

    Workshop page (SFU Canvas): GIS workshops page includes workshop descriptions and suggested streams for different disciplines, handouts, slides, and example datasets

      Register for upcoming workshops

      Dates Location
      Tuesday, July 28, 2020 - 10:00am to 12:00pm via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

      Python

      Next semester's workshops will be posted soon.

      Qualitative Data Analysis

      Introduction to NVivo for Windows [Online]

      NVivo is a qualitative data analysis software program, but what does that mean -- and what does it mean for your research? Find out what NVivo is, when to use it, and how to get started.

      In this hands-on introductory workshop, you'll take a tour of the NVivo software environment, using sample data. You’ll be introduced to NVivo’s functions and you’ll leave equipped with the basic info you need to begin working with NVivo. Topics introduced may include importing files and beginning coding.

      This workshop is suitable for those with little or no experience using NVivo or other qualitative data analysis software.

      Notes: Before the workshop, participants should download and install the latest version of NVivo. You can download NVivo and the license key with your SFU computing ID by using the self-serve download link here. If you are unable to get past the authentication page, then please email nvivo-rc@sfu.ca.

      Register for upcoming workshops

      Dates Location
      Tuesday, June 9, 2020 - 11:00am to 1:00pm via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

      Introduction to NVivo for Mac [Online]

      NVivo is a qualitative data analysis software program, but what does that mean -- and what does it mean for your research? Find out what NVivo is, when to use it, and how to get started.

      In this hands-on introductory workshop, you'll take a tour of the NVivo software environment, using sample data. You’ll be introduced to NVivo’s functions and you’ll leave equipped with the basic info you need to begin working with NVivo. Topics introduced may include importing files and beginning coding.

      This workshop is suitable for those with little or no experience using NVivo or other qualitative data analysis software.


      Note: Before the workshop, participants should download and install the latest version of NVivo. You can download NVivo and the license key with your SFU computing ID by using the self-serve download link here. If you are unable to get past the authentication page, then please email nvivo-rc@sfu.ca.

      Register for upcoming workshops

      Dates Location
      Thursday, June 18, 2020 - 2:00pm to 4:00pm via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

      Making Literature Reviews Easier with NVivo for Windows [Online]

      This interactive workshop introduces importing and coding of literature review materials and key tools that can be particularly helpful when reviewing literature in your area of research.

      Topics covered include:

      • introducing NVivo and setting up a project
      • working with your information
      • identifying themes, topics and ideas and collecting data to support them
      • using tools such as text search query, matrix coding query, and Framework Matrix.

      What will you achieve from this session? You will have the knowledge to set up a literature review in NVivo, and begin to work with your information. You will also be able to use NVivo to organize your content and begin to identify themes, topics or ideas. It is appropriate for those who have had some experience with NVivo. For more information about NVivo at SFU, please visit NVivo Software for Research Analysis.

      Notes:

      • Before the workshop, participants should download and install the latest version of NVivo. You can download NVivo and the license key with your SFU computing ID by using the self-serve download link here. If you are unable to get past the authentication page, then please email nvivo-rc@sfu.ca.
      • Participants should also have some familiarity with citation management software (Zotero, Mendeley, Refworks, EndNote, etc). Zotero will be used during this workshop.

      Register for upcoming workshops

      Dates Location
      Monday, June 29, 2020 - 1:00pm to 3:00pm via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

      Making Literature Reviews Easier with NVivo for Mac [Online]

      This interactive workshop introduces importing and coding of literature review materials and key tools that can be particularly helpful when reviewing literature in your area of research.

      Topics covered include:

      • introducing NVivo and setting up a project
      • working with your information
      • identifying themes, topics and ideas and collecting data to support them
      • using tools such as text search query, matrix coding query, and Framework Matrix.

      What will you achieve from this session? You will have the knowledge to set up a literature review in NVivo, and begin to work with your information. You will also be able to use NVivo to organize your content and begin to identify themes, topics or ideas. It is appropriate for those who have had some experience with NVivo. For more information about NVivo at SFU, please visit NVivo Software for Research Analysis.

      Notes:

      • Before the workshop, participants should download and install the latest version of NVivo. You can download NVivo and the license key with your SFU computing ID by using the self-serve download link here. If you are unable to get past the authentication page, then please email nvivo-rc@sfu.ca.
      • Participants should also have some familiarity with citation management software (Zotero, Mendeley, Refworks, EndNote, etc). Zotero will be used during this workshop.

      Register for upcoming workshops

      Dates Location
      Friday, July 10, 2020 - 2:00pm to 4:00pm via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

      R (Software)

      Due to current restrictions our consultations in R will all be done remotely (e.g., Skype, Zoom, email, etc.) until further notice. To set up a consultation appointment, please email us at data-services@sfu.ca with some details on your questions about using R. 

      Data anonymization: note that any data needs to be suitably anonymized if working with sensitive subjects before meeting with the Research Programming Peer. 

      Introduction to R [Online]

      This series of lessons will introduce you to the programming language R.  R is an open-source, widely used, and increasingly popular tool for statistical and data analyses, text mining, geospatial analysis, modelling, and a growing number of other applications. No prior knowledge is required. Students will learn the skills needed to start analyzing their own data.

      The topics covered include:

      • the R environment (directories, workspace, scripts, and packages),
      • simple commands to get you started,
      • data structures (vector, matrix, data frames, lists),
      • basic data analysis tools (built-in statistical packages, plotting, etc.)

       As time permits, an introduction to functions may also be covered.

      Requirements:

      • Participants need to install the latest versions of R and RStudio prior to attending the workshop.

      Register for upcoming workshops

      Dates Location
      Monday, June 22, 2020 - 10:00am to 12:00pm
      Tuesday, June 23, 2020 - 10:00am to 12:00pm
      Wednesday, June 24, 2020 - 10:00am to 12:00pm
      Thursday, June 25, 2020 - 10:00am to 12:00pm
      Friday, June 26, 2020 - 10:00am to 12:00pm
      via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

      Got Data? Use R for Data Visualization [Online]

      Data visualization is the process of graphically representing data. Visualizing data allows you to draw insights, find patterns, as well as define and test models which might be difficult to create by observing raw data only. There are a number of R packages which help you with numerous types of visualizations.
       
      By the end of this workshop you will be able to use R to create 2D scatter plots, bar charts, and box plots, and use R functions to ease the process of finding linear relationships and models using data provided throughout the workshop. Additionally, you will learn about selecting appropriate colour palettes for your plots. Depending on interest and time, we will explore adding interactivity to your plots. 
       

      Requirements

      • Bring your own laptop
      • Willingness to learn more about R (whether for the first time or as an experienced R programmer)
      • Install the latest version of R and Rstudio 

      Required libraries

      • ggplot2,
      • patchwork,
      • RColorBrewer,
      • ggiraph (if time permits).
       

      Register for upcoming workshops

      Dates Location
      Wednesday, July 15, 2020 - 10:00am to 12:00pm
      Thursday, July 16, 2020 - 10:00am to 12:00pm
      via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

      R for Literature Scholars [Online]

      Computational analysis, also known as distant reading, provides access to information or insights about a text that would be nearly impossible to gather using methods of close reading and “manual” synthesis. This workshop is based on Matthew Jockers’ book “Text Analysis with R for Students of Literature”. We will provide an introduction to computational text analysis using the programming language R and look at 1-2 analysis techniques based on word frequency. 

      Requirements:

      • this workshop is for beginners;
      • a computer with latest version of R and RStudio installed in advance of the workshop

      Register for upcoming workshops

      Dates Location
      Thursday, August 6, 2020 - 9:00am to 12:00pm via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

      Statistics

      Finding Canadian Census Data [Online]

      The Census Program run by Statistics Canada provides a statistical portrait of the country every five years. It provides important information on the demographic, social, and economic conditions of the country's population. Navigating Stats Can's website, however, can be quite confusing due to the variety of Census products and complexity of the data. This workshop will cover: 

      1. How to clarify your needs surrounding Census data 
      2. Selected census products on Stats Can's website
      3. Databases the SFU Library provides access to, including  Canadian Census AnalyserNesstar, and SimplyAnalytics
      4. How to map Census data (briefly) 

       

      Register for upcoming workshops

      Dates Location
      Tuesday, July 7, 2020 - 10:00am to 11:30am via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

      Visual Analytics

      Get Started with Tableau Public for Data Visualization [Online]

      Tableau is a data visualization tool that is being used to help analyze data and illustrate the patterns and insights behind them. This online, interactive workshop will introduce researchers and students to Tableau Public, a free access version of Tableau.

      You will leave this workshop with an understanding of how to:

      • connect datasets to your Tableau workbook;
      • create a variety of basic chart types (including bar charts, line graphs, and maps);
      • publish and share interactive charts and graphs.
      Requirements:
      • No prior experience with Tableau is necessary.
      • Before the workshop, please download and install the latest version of Tableau Public to your laptop.

      Register for upcoming workshops

      Dates Location
      Wednesday, June 10, 2020 - 10:00am to 12:00pm via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)
      Friday, July 17, 2020 - 10:00am to 12:00pm via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

      Got Data? Use R for Data Visualization [Online]

      Data visualization is the process of graphically representing data. Visualizing data allows you to draw insights, find patterns, as well as define and test models which might be difficult to create by observing raw data only. There are a number of R packages which help you with numerous types of visualizations.
       
      By the end of this workshop you will be able to use R to create 2D scatter plots, bar charts, and box plots, and use R functions to ease the process of finding linear relationships and models using data provided throughout the workshop. Additionally, you will learn about selecting appropriate colour palettes for your plots. Depending on interest and time, we will explore adding interactivity to your plots. 
       

      Requirements

      • Bring your own laptop
      • Willingness to learn more about R (whether for the first time or as an experienced R programmer)
      • Install the latest version of R and Rstudio 

      Required libraries

      • ggplot2,
      • patchwork,
      • RColorBrewer,
      • ggiraph (if time permits).
       

      Register for upcoming workshops

      Dates Location
      Wednesday, July 15, 2020 - 10:00am to 12:00pm
      Thursday, July 16, 2020 - 10:00am to 12:00pm
      via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

      Scholarly communication

      Get published: Choosing a journal [Online]

      This online workshop will help you choose a suitable journal for publishing your research. This workshop will appeal to graduate students with all levels of publishing experience. We invite you to join us whether you have published in academic journals before or are considering this for the first time. We will discuss:

      • Where to look for journals in your discipline
      • How to tell if a journal is right for your work
      • When and how to consider journal rankings such as the Journal Impact Factor 
      • How to make your work open access
      • How to identify and avoid predatory publishers

      Register for upcoming workshops

      Dates Location
      Wednesday, May 27, 2020 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

      Writing workshops

      Drop-in Graduate Student Writing Support (online)

      We welcome you to “drop in” to one of our live sessions with a graduate writing facilitator to discuss your writing questions or concerns. They will be able to answer quick questions, refer you to resources, and provide direction on next steps.

      Join our Graduate Writing Online (Canvas) Community to make use of our drop-in writing support in Blackboard Collaborate, find additional writing resources, and connect with other graduate writers.

      Upcoming Summer 2020 drop-in sessions:

      Tuesday, May 19 2:00 – 4:00pm

      Monday May 25, 2:00 – 4:00pm

      Tuesday June 2, 2:00 – 4:00pm

      Monday June 8, 2:00 – 4:00pm

      Writing Workshops

      Please register for the following writing workshops:

      Thesis Writing at Home during a Pandemic [Online]

      Our current living and working conditions may be impacting your thesis writing process in unpredictable ways, even while the demands of graduate school seem to hold steady. This session will provide some helpful tips for writing (or not writing) your thesis while at home, providing both a reasonable and compassionate outlook on productive writing practices.

      Register for upcoming workshops

      Dates Location
      Friday, May 29, 2020 - 1:00pm to 2:30pm via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

      Thesis workshops 

      Next semester's workshops will be posted soon.