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Research Commons - Workshops for graduate students & postdoctoral fellows

The Research Commons is pleased to offer you a range of workshops. Register for upcoming workshops. Search by date in our workshops calendar.

If you do not see the topic(s) you are interested in and/or would like a specialized workshop for yourself and a group of colleagues, send a request to research-commons@sfu.ca.

SFU values diversity and is committed to inclusion. If you believe you require any disability related accommodations in order to fully access and participate in our workshops and/or events, please contact us directly at library-workshops@sfu.ca. Please contact us as soon as possible as some accommodations will require lead time to arrange (i.e. CART, ASL)

All in a Day - Research Toolkit

This is a suite of workshops for graduate students and postdoctoral fellows taking place at SFU Vancouver on Saturday, February 3, 2018.

Introduction to R for Non-Science Majors

This workshop is designed for non-science students interested in the statistical computing program R. No prior knowledge of R is required. Often data outside of the sciences includes textual data, such as a corpus or series of surveys. In this workshop we’ll learn how to process textual data in R, as well as the basic skills to start analyzing it. Specific topics covered include the R environment (directories, workspace, scripts, and packages), data structures (vector, matrix, data frames, lists), and the beginnings of simple data analysis (built-in statistical packages, elementary statistics, etc.).

Note: Workshop participants will need to bring their own laptops, with R and RStudio installed prior to attending the workshop.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Saturday, February 3, 2018 - 10:00am to 4:30pm Harbour Centre, Rm 1600

Getting Started With QGIS for PC Users

QGIS is Open Source GIS software for viewing, editing, and managing spatial data in a wide variety of commonly used vector and raster formats. Free to download, QGIS can be installed on Mac, Windows, Linux, and Unix operating systems -  however, this workshop will only cover QGIS for Windows. This workshop will provide and introduction to the basic features of QGIS using data from the Lower Mainland.

Note: you will need to bring your own Windows laptop, loaded with the latest version of QGIS for Windows, available here: https://qgis.org/en/site/forusers/download.html. Please download latest version of QGIS for Windows prior to attending the workshop.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Saturday, February 3, 2018 - 10:00am to 12:00pm Harbour Centre, Rm 1520

Find Data / Share Data

Are you interested in increasing the visibility of your research? This workshop will help you describe your data for long term access and findability.   As a bonus, we'll also show  you how to find data relevant to your research.

Some of the tools we'll be looking at are DataCite, Abacus, ICPSR and Radar.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Saturday, February 3, 2018 - 1:00pm to 2:30pm Harbour Centre, Rm 1520

An Introduction to Using Tableau for Data Visualization

Tableau is a data visualization tool that is being used to help analyze data and illustrate the patterns and insights behind them.

This interactive workshop will introduce researchers or students to Tableau Public, a free access version of Tableau.

Requirements:

  • No prior experience with Tableau is necessary.
  • Participants will need to bring their own laptop preloaded with the latest version of Tableau Public

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Saturday, February 3, 2018 - 3:00pm to 4:30pm Harbour Centre, Rm 1520

Digital Humanities

Collecting, Organizing, and Describing Archival Research

This workshop is a practical session for image management, designed for researchers who work with rare books and archival materials.
 
The first part of this two-hour workshop will walk through the stages of collecting and organizing data, drawing on materials held in Special Collections to illustrate the process. Using Tropy, a free, easy-to-use open-source software, we will walk through what kinds of information it is important to record, how to import your photos into Tropy, and how to organize them.
 
The second part of this workshop will be a discussion about metadata - the language we use to organize our data. While Humanities researchers may be more familiar with library catalogue metadata, where a book, for example, has a title, a subject, a genre, etc, digital tools like Tropy offer other ways to organize the elements of our research. This cafe session will discuss what kinds of metadata humanities researchers often need to use, and how they can draw on metadata standards like Dublin Core to link their digital work to other sites and make it accessible to other researchers and institutions. While we’ll use Tropy as one of our examples, we’ll also discuss ways to create metadata for other research objects like books or recordings.

Note: Please bring your laptop preloaded with Tropy prior to attending the workshop.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Wednesday, January 24, 2018 - 1:30pm to 3:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Wosk Seminar Room 7100 (inside Special Collections)

Tools for Humanities Data Analysis

This workshop will explore some of the tools available for analyzing and presenting different kinds of data once it has been collected. It will provide an introduction to some of the free and easy-to-learn online tools available and ideas for how to integrate them into both research projects and the classroom. In this workshop, we will explore:

  • How to use Story Maps to integrate geographical data with text, images, and multimedia content to create beautiful and intuitive interactive maps;
  • How to curate digital exhibits using Omeka; and
  • How to use Hypothes.is for online annotation

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Wednesday, February 21, 2018 - 1:30pm to 3:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Wosk Seminar Room 7100 (inside Special Collections)

Collaboration and Project Management in the Digital Humanities

This two-part workshop is designed to cover some of the pragmatic concerns involved in managing a large-scale digital project. Participants are encouraged to attend both parts, but are welcome to come to one or the other.

Note: The first part will be the first hour; the 2nd part starts on the 2nd hour. Please register and join us for the first part, second part or both parts.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Wednesday, March 7, 2018 - 1:30pm to 3:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Wosk Seminar Room 7100 (inside Special Collections)

EAL/ESL

Next semester's workshops will be posted soon.

Learning

Next semester's workshops will be posted soon.

Research data management

Introduction to GitHub

GitHub is a website and hosting service that is celebrated in tech circles. Did you know that it's useful for non-programmers? In this hands-on workshop, we'll be covering the fundamentals of GitHub including repositories, version control, project management, wikis, and Gist. The content is designed for novice users; all learners are welcome. Come to discover how this digital tool can improve collaboration in your research projects.  To participate in this workshop, you must bring a laptop (preferred) or a tablet. You may be contacted with software installation instructions prior to the event.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Wednesday, January 31, 2018 - 9:30am to 12:30pm Harbour Centre, Rm 2510

Find Data / Share Data

Are you interested in increasing the visibility of your research? This workshop will help you describe your data for long term access and findability.   As a bonus, we'll also show  you how to find data relevant to your research.

Some of the tools we'll be looking at are DataCite, Abacus, ICPSR and Radar.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Saturday, February 3, 2018 - 1:00pm to 2:30pm Harbour Centre, Rm 1520

De-identify data

De-identification enables sharing of data for secondary purposes. Changes may be made to the data and controls can be put in place to manage risk.

This workshop will introduce a risk-based methodology for de-identification that is appropriate for various academic disciplines. Topics include: in/direct identifiers, risk thresholds and measurement, plausible attacks, techniques (generalization, suppression, and subsampling), documentation, equivalence classes, and k-anonymity.

The workshop uses content from an eBook available through SFU Library:

Emam, K. E., & Arbuckle, L. (2013). Anonymizing Health Data: Case Studies and Methods to Get You Started. Sebastopol, CA, USA: O’Reilly Media, Inc. Retrieved from http://proquest.safaribooksonline.com.proxy.lib.sfu.ca/9781449363062

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Wednesday, February 28, 2018 - 11:00am to 12:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

Find Data / Share Data

Are you interested in increasing the visibility of your research? This workshop will help you describe your data for long term access and findability.   As a bonus, we'll also show  you how to find data relevant to your research.

Some of the tools we'll be looking at are DataCite, Abacus, ICPSR and Radar.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Wednesday, March 14, 2018 - 11:00am to 12:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

Clean data

Do you work with research data in spreadsheets? If so, this workshop is designed for you! We’ll be covering the best practices for Data Organization in Spreadsheets, according to Data Carpentry. Then we’ll look at formatting values, fixing dates, merging/splitting columns, and more. By the end, you’ll be prepared to take your spreadsheets to the next level.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Wednesday, April 11, 2018 - 11:00am to 12:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7200

Privacy and Public Pedagogy in an Expository Society

How is privacy understood and experienced in educational settings today? How do students (in particular) navigate the complex webs of monitoring and information sharing that characterize contemporary educational institutions and, crucially, how do these institutions prepare them to make informed decisions about privacy and personal information? This presentation will explore these questions and situate them in relation to the emergence of what Harcourt (2015) refers to as the ‘expository society’ (Harcourt 2015): a form of social organization in which everyone is increasingly inclined to simultaneously expose themselves and watch others, and where this inclination is facilitated and driven by digital power and technologies.

Mike Larsen is the President of the BC Freedom of Information and Privacy Association, and a faculty member in the Criminology Department at Kwantlen Polytechnic University. He teaches courses on criminal justice, criminological theory, law & society, policing and police accountability, surveillance, and transparency. His research deals with access to information, privacy, and security practices, particularly as they involve the deprivation of liberty and contestations around government secrecy, public accountability, and the right to know. 
 
 
 
 

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Thursday, January 25, 2018 - 10:30am to 11:30am Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

Secure data

Protect your research data by following strong security practices. This workshop will cover topics including: cloud storage, full disk encryption, threat modelling, communication and file sharing, account security, two-factor authentication (2FA), and digital preservation.

Learn how to keep data secure with SFU resources.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Thursday, January 25, 2018 - 1:00pm to 2:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

Records Security & Surveillance Self-Defense

Tools and best practices will keep your records more secure. We'll consider security topics including cloud storage, full disk encryption, digital preservation, and secure destruction of records.
 
In the hands-on component of the workshop, participants will undertake surveillance self-defense by:
  • Installing a password manager,
  • Enabling two-factor authentication on an account, and
  • Using plug-ins for safer browsing (i.e. Privacy Badger, HTTPS Everywhere).

Note: attendees must bring their own device and laptops are preferred.

 

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Thursday, January 25, 2018 - 6:00pm to 8:00pm Harbour Centre, Rm 1520

What is the Open Science Framework (OSF)?

The OSF is a free, open-source web app that manages research projects at all stages of the research lifecycle. It is used for documentation, file storage, versioning, collaboration, and it connects the various tools researchers currently use. The OSF is produced by the Center for Open Science (COS) and has over 60,000 users across various academic disciplines. Attend the workshop to learn more and explore the OSF here: https://osf.io/

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Monday, February 5, 2018 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

Version data

Git is a version control system that enables reproducible research and collaboration in teams. In this workshop, novice users will be introduced to Git on the command line. Topics include: creating a repository, tracking changes, exploring history, using GitHub, and handling conflicts.

The lesson is produced by Software Carpentry.

Registrants will be contacted prior to the event with installation instructions.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Tuesday, February 13, 2018 - 9:30am to 12:30pm Burnaby, SFU's Big Data Hub (Applied Science Building - Flexible Meeting Room ASB 10908)

Intro to Shell Scripting: The Terminal Does Not Hate You

Have you ever had to use a command line interface before? Was it to do one specific thing that you needed and didn't understand particularly well? Did you enjoy the experience? Did you nervously make a joke about DOS? Does reading the word "DOS" right now make you nervous? Are you a nervous person? This workshop will teach some of the particularities of working in a modern bash shell, connecting to external servers, using some helpful command line programs you probably don't know about, and generally making the entire terminal experience much more pleasant for you than it probably is right now. Highly recommended for amateur programmers who have started learning a language or two but still hate hate hate not being able to use their mouse and a nice GUI for certain things. The gun* is good. The mouse is evil. (The gun is a bash shell in this analogy.)

-------

About Alex Garnett:

Alex is a Data Curation and Digital Preservation Specialist at SFU Library. He is extremely verbose in real life, but not when programming, which is why he loves shell scripting, since it lets him type little nonsense invocations like $ ps aux | sed -e $(echo "s/.*/man paps/g") which better programmers would tell you are both useless and unintelligible. He believes that the world is full of suffering and that everyone should learn regular expressions.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Tuesday, February 13, 2018 - 1:00pm to 4:00pm Burnaby, SFU's Big Data Hub (Applied Science Building - Flexible Meeting Room ASB 10908)

Keynote: Big Data and History (or ‘how this historian learned to stop worrying and love big data’)

The continually-growing volume of cultural heritage held in web archives is a vast resource awaiting the use of researchers in fields as varied as history, political science, sociology, and computer science. While web archives have been collected and saved since 1996, scholarly use has lagged due to the sheer scale of the data that confronts potential users. In this talk, Ian Milligan argues that interdisciplinary collaboration, bringing together librarians, computer scientists, and historians, holds the best pathway forward. Drawing on varied case studies, from explorations of 1990s youth culture to comparing the archived websites of Obama and Trump, Milligan highlights efforts to unlock web archives for historical research.

-------

About Ian Milligan:

Ian Milligan is an Associate Professor of History at the University of Waterloo, where he teaches Canadian and digital history. Ian's work explores how historians can use web archives, the large repositories of cultural information that the Internet Archive and many other libraries have been collecting since 1996. He has published two books: the co-authored Exploring Big Historical Data: The Historian’s Macroscope (2015) and Rebel Youth: 1960s Labour Unrest, Young Workers, and New Leftists in English Canada (2014). In 2016, Ian was named the Canadian Society for Digital Humanities/Société canadienne des humanités numériques (CSDH/SCHN)’s recipient of the Outstanding Early Career Award.

-------

Note: Keynote will be from 10:00am to 11:00am. Following the keynote, after a short break, there will be a  Faculty Panel: "Why should you love your data? The benefits of well-curated data."

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Wednesday, February 14, 2018 - 10:00am to 12:15pm Burnaby, SFU's Big Data Hub, Presentation Studio (Applied Science Building - Room 10900)

Twitter and Web Archive Analysis at Scale

Born-digital sources, such as Twitter streams and archived web pages, have the potential to re-work scholarship in several crucial respects. The sheer volume of cultural information generated and, crucially, preserved every day presents exciting opportunities for historians, political scientists, sociologists, and other scholars. Since 2015, the Web Archives for Historical Research group at the University of Waterloo and York University has been developing, testing, and using tools to explore wide swaths of our collective cultural heritage. In 2017, Waterloo and York received a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to develop the "Archives Unleashed" project, a set of tools for web and social media analysis.

This day and a half workshop presents a series of Twitter and Web Archive analysis tools for researchers to use. On Day 1(half day), in the afternoon, Nick Ruest (Digital Assets Librarian, York University) will run a hands-on workshop on Twitter analysis (using both the twarc tool and the Archives Unleashed Toolkit). On Day 2, in the morning, Ian Milligan (Associate Professor of History, University of Waterloo) will run an Archives Unleashed workshop on web archiving analysis, using collections form Simon Fraser University. Finally, in the afternoon, participants will have the tools and resources to work on independent projects, with support from Ruest and Milligan.

 

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Wednesday, February 14, 2018 - 1:30pm to 4:00pm
Thursday, February 15, 2018 - 9:00am to 4:00pm
Day 1: Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons | Day 2: Vancouver, Harbour Centre, Rm 1425

Research programming

Building robust data processing pipelines with Python and Shell Scripts

Practical scientific computing involves extensive manipulation and processing of data. A pipeline is a self-contained program that performs a series of data processing steps with very little effort needed from the user. An ideal scientific computing pipeline is one that requires the user to only provide input data files and performs the rest of the computation on its own. Building pipelines like these are ideal for scientific research because they allow others to easily replicate computational research. In this workshop, participants will learn the basics of creating robust data processing pipelines using shell scripts and Python. Participants will build their own genetic variant caller pipeline to showcase this skill.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Thursday, February 1, 2018 - 3:30pm to 5:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

Getting started with emacs

Emacs is (along with Vim) one of the two most powerful text editors out there. They both are amongst the oldest software still in use (they started in the 70s!) and, thanks to a horde of passionate developers, grew over four decades to become monsters of power and beauty. They are absolutely free: GNU Emacs was actually created by Richard Stallman, a software freedom activist and author of copyleft and GNU GPL. Thousands of packages were written to extend emacs capabilities to handle emails with joy (for real), have syntax highlighting and run codes in most coding languages, keep notes, organize todos, plan projects, compare files and directories, write papers, play games, read the news... all that with efficient keybindings :\

... and of course... in plain text!
Have I picked your curiosity?

Come to this introductory level workshop to discover what emacs is and what it can do. Even if you do not plan on learning emacs, being exposed to its world could be inspiring and make you reconsider your workflow and work tools. If you intend on playing with emacs during the workshop, come with a version installed on your machine (see below).

Visit this page for instructions on how to install emacs as well as some of the material covered during the workshop.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Tuesday, February 13, 2018 - 3:00pm to 4:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

Introduction to Database and SQL

This is an introductory course on Databases and SQL Querying. There are no pre-requisites for this workshop. If you are looking to get acquainted with the concept of Databases and Queries, this is the right workshop for you.
 
Requirements:
Bring your laptop and we will walk through very basic installation to setting up your environment to creating your first table and writing queries against it.
 

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Thursday, February 22, 2018 - 3:30pm to 5:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

Introduction to Social Network Analysis with R

Social Network Analysis is to visualize and analyze data from a social network like Twitter or Facebook. If you're involved in analytics in any capacity, this course will be a huge help, teaching you how the R SNA and igraph modules works and how to format data for analysis, create graphs, analyze network graphs, and visualize networks.
 
Requirements:
Basic knowledge of R programming, but no knowledge of social network analysis required.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Thursday, March 15, 2018 - 3:30pm to 5:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

Programming with Python

Python is a popular language for scientific computing, and great for general-purpose programming as well.

This 2-day hands-on workshop will cover basic concepts and tools, including program design, version control, data management, and task automation. This workshop is offered by Software Carpentry, whose mission is to help scientists and engineers get more research done in less time and with less pain by teaching them basic lab skills for scientific computing.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Monday, January 29, 2018 - 9:30am to 4:30pm
Tuesday, January 30, 2018 - 9:30am to 4:30pm
Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons
Wednesday, March 14, 2018 - 9:30am to 4:30pm
Thursday, March 15, 2018 - 9:30am to 4:30pm
Burnaby, SFU's Big Data Hub (Applied Science Building - Flexible Meeting Room ASB 10908)

Intro to Shell Scripting: The Terminal Does Not Hate You

Have you ever had to use a command line interface before? Was it to do one specific thing that you needed and didn't understand particularly well? Did you enjoy the experience? Did you nervously make a joke about DOS? Does reading the word "DOS" right now make you nervous? Are you a nervous person? This workshop will teach some of the particularities of working in a modern bash shell, connecting to external servers, using some helpful command line programs you probably don't know about, and generally making the entire terminal experience much more pleasant for you than it probably is right now. Highly recommended for amateur programmers who have started learning a language or two but still hate hate hate not being able to use their mouse and a nice GUI for certain things. The gun* is good. The mouse is evil. (The gun is a bash shell in this analogy.)

-------

About Alex Garnett:

Alex is a Data Curation and Digital Preservation Specialist at SFU Library. He is extremely verbose in real life, but not when programming, which is why he loves shell scripting, since it lets him type little nonsense invocations like $ ps aux | sed -e $(echo "s/.*/man paps/g") which better programmers would tell you are both useless and unintelligible. He believes that the world is full of suffering and that everyone should learn regular expressions.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Tuesday, February 13, 2018 - 1:00pm to 4:00pm Burnaby, SFU's Big Data Hub (Applied Science Building - Flexible Meeting Room ASB 10908)

Research software

Citation Management

Up and Running with Zotero

Want to make your research and writing more efficient? Hate the last minute rush of trying to create a correctly formatted bibliography? This workshop is for you! We will introduce Zotero, a citation management tool that can help you import, organize, share, and manage your citations and documents, as well as create correctly formatted in-text citations and bibliographies in almost any style -- in seconds.

Bring your laptop: this interactive workshop will cover registration, installation, and everything that you need to know to get up and running with Zotero.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Wednesday, January 24, 2018 - 11:00am to 12:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

Up and Running with Mendeley

Want to make your research and writing more efficient? Hate the last minute rush of trying to create a correctly formatted bibliography? This workshop is for you! We will introduce Mendeley, a citation management tool that can help you import, organize, share, and manage your citations and documents, as well as create correctly formatted in-text citations and bibliographies in almost any style -- in seconds.

Bring your laptop: this interactive workshop will cover registration, installation, and everything that you need to know to get up and running with Mendeley.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Wednesday, January 24, 2018 - 3:30pm to 4:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

GIS

Searching for Geospatial Data

In this hands-on workshop participants will learn how to access a number of sources and repositories for geospatial data, at SFU and beyond. Constructing an effective search for geospatial data will also be covered, as will the array of GIS services available via SFU Library's Research Commons.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Wednesday, January 24, 2018 - 2:30pm to 4:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Lab 2105

Getting Started With QGIS for Mac Users

QGIS is Open Source GIS software for creating maps and viewing, editing, and managing spatial data in a wide variety of commonly used vector and raster formats. Free to download, QGIS can be installed on Mac, Windows, Linux, and Unix operating systems. This workshop will provide and introduction to the basic features of QGIS using geospatial data from the Lower Mainland.

Attendees will need to bring a laptop with QGIS installed. You can download QGIS here: http://www.qgis.org/en/site/. If you need access to a laptop, please email Julie Jones, GIS & Map Librarian at jsj7[at]sfu.ca.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Thursday, January 25, 2018 - 1:30pm to 3:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7200

Working with Canadian Census data and geocoding in ArcGIS

This short workshop will cover two very practical skill areas for ArcGIS users: finding Canadian Census data and using it in ArcGIS and geocoding (the process of giving addresses spatial information so they can be used as a dataset). Good for attendees who are new to these processes as well as those wanting a quick refresher.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Thursday, February 1, 2018 - 10:30am to 12:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Lab 2105

Getting Started With QGIS for PC Users

QGIS is Open Source GIS software for viewing, editing, and managing spatial data in a wide variety of commonly used vector and raster formats. Free to download, QGIS can be installed on Mac, Windows, Linux, and Unix operating systems -  however, this workshop will only cover QGIS for Windows. This workshop will provide and introduction to the basic features of QGIS using data from the Lower Mainland.

Note: you will need to bring your own Windows laptop, loaded with the latest version of QGIS for Windows, available here: https://qgis.org/en/site/forusers/download.html. Please download latest version of QGIS for Windows prior to attending the workshop.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Saturday, February 3, 2018 - 10:00am to 12:00pm Harbour Centre, Rm 1520

Introduction to ArcGIS

Designed for students new to Geographic Information Systems (GIS), this workshop will introduce basic GIS concepts using the ArcGIS software environment.

Topics will include:

  • ArcGIS software basics
  • Creating simple maps
  • Finding geospatial data and resources

The workshop assumes attendees have no previous experience with GIS.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Thursday, February 8, 2018 - 10:00am to 11:30am Burnaby, Bennett Library, Lab 2105

Advanced GIS I: Tips and Tricks for Handling Spatial and Tabular Data

This workshop will deepen your knowledge of attribute tables. You will learn to add new data in an existing table, import data from an Excel worksheet, join two tables together, convert a list of XY coordinates to a shapefile, and create simple SQL-queries.

Covered in this workshop:

  • Editing an attribute table
  • Importing Excel tables and XY coordinates into ArcMap
  • Formulating queries
  • Table join
  • Formulating queries
  • Generating statistics from an attribute table and summarizing a field
  • Use of the field calculator

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Thursday, March 1, 2018 - 10:30am to 12:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Lab 2105

Advanced GIS II: Vector Analysis in ArcMap

This workshop will provide an introduction to vector analysis, attribute handling, and the formulation of spatial queries.

This workshop will cover:

  • Searching by attribute
  • Making spatial queries
  • Exporting query results to shapefiles

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Thursday, March 15, 2018 - 1:30pm to 3:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Lab 2105

Python

Programming with Python

Python is a popular language for scientific computing, and great for general-purpose programming as well.

This 2-day hands-on workshop will cover basic concepts and tools, including program design, version control, data management, and task automation. This workshop is offered by Software Carpentry, whose mission is to help scientists and engineers get more research done in less time and with less pain by teaching them basic lab skills for scientific computing.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Monday, January 29, 2018 - 9:30am to 4:30pm
Tuesday, January 30, 2018 - 9:30am to 4:30pm
Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons
Wednesday, March 14, 2018 - 9:30am to 4:30pm
Thursday, March 15, 2018 - 9:30am to 4:30pm
Burnaby, SFU's Big Data Hub (Applied Science Building - Flexible Meeting Room ASB 10908)

Qualitative Data Analysis

NVivo Project Time - open laptop lab for qualitative data analysis

Set aside a few hours in your schedule to devote to advancing your work in NVivo. Bring in your project and work away in the company of other NVivo users. During this unstructured time, an NVivo facilitator will be on hand to answer your questions and help you move through any sticking points.  Whether you're just getting started or are quite far along, this is your time. We’ll put on the kettle for tea and coffee, so bring your own mug.

This is a Bring Your Own Laptop session and is suitable for both Mac and Windows users. 

Please sign up so we know you're joining us.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Wednesday, January 24, 2018 - 12:30pm to 3:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons
Wednesday, January 31, 2018 - 12:30pm to 3:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons
Wednesday, February 7, 2018 - 12:30pm to 3:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons
Wednesday, February 21, 2018 - 12:30pm to 3:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons
Wednesday, February 28, 2018 - 12:30pm to 3:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons
Wednesday, March 7, 2018 - 12:30pm to 3:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons
Wednesday, March 14, 2018 - 12:30pm to 3:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons
Wednesday, March 21, 2018 - 12:30pm to 3:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons
Wednesday, March 28, 2018 - 12:30pm to 3:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons
Wednesday, April 4, 2018 - 12:30pm to 3:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

The Nuts and Bolts of NVivo for Windows

NVivo is a qualitative data analysis software program, but what does that mean -- and what does it mean for your research? Find out what NVivo is, when to use it, and how to get started.

In this hands-on introductory workshop, you'll take a tour of the NVivo software environment, using sample data. You’ll be introduced to NVivo’s functions and you’ll leave equipped with the basic info you need to begin working with NVivo. Topics introduced may include importing files and beginning coding.

This workshop is suitable for those with little or no experience using NVivo or other qualitative data analysis software.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Wednesday, January 31, 2018 - 9:30am to 11:30am Burnaby, Bennett Library, Lab 4009

Making Literature Reviews a Breeze (almost) with NVivo for Mac

This interactive workshop introduces importing and coding of literature review materials and key tools that can be particularly helpful when reviewing literature in your area of research.

Topics covered include: introducing NVivo and setting up a project working with your information identifying themes, topics and ideas and collecting data to support them using tools such as text search query, matrix coding query, and Framework Matrix.

What will you achieve from this course? At the end of this, you will have the knowledge to set up a literature review in NVivo, and begin to work with your information. You will also be able to use NVivo to organize your content and begin to identify themes, topics or ideas.

It is appropriate for those who have had some experience with NVivo or who have taken the Nuts and Bolts of NVivo workshop. For more information about NVivo at SFU, please visit NVivo Software for Research Analysis.

Participants should also have some familiarity with citation management software (Zotero, Mendeley, Refworks, EndNote, etc).

Note: You will need to bring your own Mac laptop, loaded with the latest version of NVivo for Mac.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Tuesday, March 6, 2018 - 9:30am to 11:30am Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

R (Software)

Introduction to R for Non-Science Majors

This workshop is designed for non-science students interested in the statistical computing program R. No prior knowledge of R is required. Often data outside of the sciences includes textual data, such as a corpus or series of surveys. In this workshop we’ll learn how to process textual data in R, as well as the basic skills to start analyzing it. Specific topics covered include the R environment (directories, workspace, scripts, and packages), data structures (vector, matrix, data frames, lists), and the beginnings of simple data analysis (built-in statistical packages, elementary statistics, etc.).

Note: Workshop participants will need to bring their own laptops, with R and RStudio installed prior to attending the workshop.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Saturday, February 3, 2018 - 10:00am to 4:30pm Harbour Centre, Rm 1600

Generalized Linear Mixed-Effects Models in R

This two-day workshop will focus on generalized linear mixed-effects models (GLMMs) using the R programming language. We will begin with a quick refresher on linear mixed-effects models and GLMs (generalized linear models), but will concentrate mostly on GLMMs.

Advanced topics will include dealing with overdispersion, zero-inflation, and delta-GLMMs for modelling positive continuous data with zeros. We will fit models with lme4, glmmTMB, and rstanarm. We will concentrate on practical elements such as choosing a modeling approach, the process of building and understanding a model, model checking, and plotting and interpreting model output.

Prior to taking this workshop, you should be comfortable with linear mixed-effects modeling and GLMs in R. Some background with dplyr and ggplot2 would be helpful, but participants can also complete some short tutorials before arriving to learn these packages.

Closer to the workshop date, some download instructions and final details will be emailed to registered participants.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Saturday, February 3, 2018 - 10:30am to 5:00pm
Sunday, February 4, 2018 - 10:30am to 5:00pm
Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7200

Introduction to Social Network Analysis with R

Social Network Analysis is to visualize and analyze data from a social network like Twitter or Facebook. If you're involved in analytics in any capacity, this course will be a huge help, teaching you how the R SNA and igraph modules works and how to format data for analysis, create graphs, analyze network graphs, and visualize networks.
 
Requirements:
Basic knowledge of R programming, but no knowledge of social network analysis required.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Thursday, March 15, 2018 - 3:30pm to 5:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

Statistics

Next semester's workshops will be posted soon.

Visual Analytics

An Introduction to Using Tableau for Data Visualization

Tableau is a data visualization tool that is being used to help analyze data and illustrate the patterns and insights behind them. This interactive workshop will introduce researchers or students to Tableau Public, a free access version of Tableau.

Requirements:

  • No prior experience with Tableau is necessary.
  • Participants will need to bring their own laptop preloaded with the latest version of Tableau Public

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Tuesday, February 13, 2018 - 10:00am to 12:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons
Friday, February 16, 2018 - 1:00pm to 3:00pm Burnaby, SFU's Big Data Hub (Applied Science Building - Flexible Meeting Room ASB 10908)
Friday, March 16, 2018 - 1:00pm to 3:00pm Burnaby, SFU's Big Data Hub (Applied Science Building - Flexible Meeting Room ASB 10908)

Scholarly communication

Get credit for your work: Distinguish yourself with ORCID

The Open Researcher and Contributor ID (ORCID) provides authors with a unique numeric identifier to distinguish themselves from other researchers and automatically link their professional publications and activities. ORCID iDs persist throughout an author's scholarly career and ensure consistent, reliable attribution of their work.

Bring your laptop: this interactive workshop will cover the basics and benefits of getting started with ORCID. Participants will leave with an ORCID ID and an understanding of how to automatically keep their profile up-to-date. 

 

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Tuesday, February 6, 2018 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons
Thursday, March 15, 2018 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

Addressing the Elephant in the Room: Grad Student Publication

Graduate students are always encouraged to publish but often without really knowing what that means or how to start. This workshop will focus on navigating the peer review process and will also touch on the topics of open access, working with an editor, and co-authorship.  It will include a discussion of copyright transfer agreements and licenses and provide insight into publishing venues for assuring your research has the best possible visibility, accessibility, and impact.

A few questions this session will help to answer:

  • How does the publishing cycle work?
  • How can you assess potential publishing venues?
  • What is peer review and how can you respond to reviewer comments?
  • What rights can you retain to your published research?
  • What are predatory publishers and how can you avoid them?

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Wednesday, February 21, 2018 - 10:00am to 11:30am Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

What's Your Impact?: An Introduction to Measuring the Impact of Your Research Within and Beyond the Academy

Who is looking at your research and how can you measure it? Find out more about research impact – what it is, how to measure it and how to leverage it. This session will help you:

  • understand what is meant by research impact,
  • become familiar with the different types of research impact metrics,
  • know the tools available to calculate research impact.
  • and devise a strategy to increase the impact of your own research activities.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Thursday, April 19, 2018 - 10:00am to 11:30am Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

Writing

Graduate Open Writing Lab: Write Time, Write Space (drop-in)

The Graduate Open Writing Lab is for all graduate students who want the time and a quiet, dedicated space to work on their writing. A Graduate Writing Facilitator will be available for consultations and to answer questions.

Registration not required - please drop in!

Spring Semester 2018 - January 8 to April 9

Burnaby Campus
Graduate Open Writing Lab (Facilitated) - Mondays, 2:00 pm to 4:30 pm, SFU Burnaby, W.A.C. Bennett Library, Research Commons, Rm 7000
(no sessions Feb 12 & Apr 2)

Vancouver Campus
Graduate Open Writing Lab (Facilitated) - Fridays, 11:30 am to 2:30 pm, SFU Vancouver, Harbour Centre - room locations listed below:

Jan 19, Rm 7356
Jan 26, Rm 101
Feb 2, Rm WCC 430
Feb 9, Rm 2235
Feb 16, Rm 7356
Feb 23 to Apr 9, Rm 101

(no session on March 30)

Workshops

Please register for the following writing workshops:

Write Conversations: Write Stronger Paragraphs to Improve Cohesion

When each paragraph has a clear structure and purpose, overall writing cohesion is improved. Today we’ll discuss how writing stronger paragraphs will help you clearly communicate with your readers with more “flow.”

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Monday, January 29, 2018 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7301

Write Conversations: Improve Readability with Thoughtful Transitions

Are you getting feedback that your writing is “choppy”? Are you overusing certain transitional words and phrases like “however” or “on the other hand”? Join today’s discussion on how to use transitions thoughtfully so that your reader can comprehend your writing with ease and clarity.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Monday, February 5, 2018 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

Thesis Boot Camp

This multi-day boot camp is for SFU graduate students at both the PhD and Masters level, who are currently writing their thesis or dissertation.

Here's your opportunity to dedicate three days to making serious progress on your dissertation or master’s thesis. Along with a comfortable, quiet working environment, snacks and lunches, you will benefit from structured time, dedicated space, professional advising and peer support—all motivating factors in that final push towards completion of your dissertation or thesis.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Tuesday, February 13, 2018 - 8:30am to 5:00pm
Wednesday, February 14, 2018 - 8:30am to 5:00pm
Thursday, February 15, 2018 - 8:30am to 5:00pm
Harbour Centre, Rm 1410-1430

Write Conversations: Reading for Writing: A (de)constructive exercise on Improving Style

Trying to shape your academic writing style takes time and effort, but it doesn’t happen in a void; better writing is supported by better reading. Join us today to work on reading for style and on transferring deconstruction skills to constructing.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Monday, February 19, 2018 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

Addressing the Elephant in the Room: Grad Student Publication

Graduate students are always encouraged to publish but often without really knowing what that means or how to start. This workshop will focus on navigating the peer review process and will also touch on the topics of open access, working with an editor, and co-authorship.  It will include a discussion of copyright transfer agreements and licenses and provide insight into publishing venues for assuring your research has the best possible visibility, accessibility, and impact.

A few questions this session will help to answer:

  • How does the publishing cycle work?
  • How can you assess potential publishing venues?
  • What is peer review and how can you respond to reviewer comments?
  • What rights can you retain to your published research?
  • What are predatory publishers and how can you avoid them?

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Wednesday, February 21, 2018 - 10:00am to 11:30am Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

Write Conversations: What's Your Research Question?

It is important to know what your research question is prior to writing your dissertation. Fully understanding what THE question is will help you make conceptual links and focus your reading and research.  How does one come up with a research question? What is a good research question?  Is the research question same thing as a hypothesis?  Join this Write Conversations session to find out.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Monday, March 5, 2018 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

Presentation Skills: Writing and Presenting the Academic Poster

Your poster speaks for you! Learn how to capture your audience's attention, communicate the key aspects of your research and persuade your intended audience to reach out to you.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Monday, March 12, 2018 - 9:30am to 11:00am Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7200

Write Conversations: Managing Writing Anxiety

Being anxious about academic writing can lead to unhelpful writing habits like avoidance and procrastination. Join us for a discussion on how to make more progress by alleviating writing anxiety!

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Monday, March 26, 2018 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

Presentation Skills for Graduate Students

Presenting in graduate school, often in front of an academic audience, can be a very rewarding, but a somewhat anxiety-provoking experience. This interactive workshop will provide practical strategies to plan, organize, and structure a professional presentation that will increase your confidence and have you delivering an engaging presentation. You’ll learn the elements that contribute to an effective presentation and how to facilitate and field questions from your audience.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Monday, April 9, 2018 - 9:30am to 11:00am Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

Lay Language

Lay language is needed in order to convey technical and advanced ideas in ways that are more effective than “dumbing it down”. You may be preparing a grant or fellowship proposal, writing for online purposes or fine tuning your “job talk”— all of which require you to translate your work and research to persons outside of your core field of study.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Monday, April 9, 2018 - 11:30am to 1:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

Extend your reach: Writing and publishing across disciplines

In this day long workshop, you will learn more effective ways to convey and communicate your research to multiple audiences and colleagues across disciplines. The day begins with a workshop on plain-language writing, including an overview of contexts that promote or strongly encourage plain language. After lunch (included), the emphasis shifts to the publishing process, strategies for assessing potential publication venues, and reaching wider audiences. Approaches to developing your research narrative will also be discussed, with a focus on tools for privacy, social media, and auditing and building your online academic portfolio. You’ll have opportunities to write and share your work with peers, and will take away practical strategies for conveying knowledge to a variety of readerships. 

Included: morning and afternoon coffee/tea with light snacks and lunch; if you have any severe dietary restrictions, please bring your own snacks and lunch

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Wednesday, April 11, 2018 - 10:00am to 3:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

Thesis

Thesis Boot Camp

This multi-day boot camp is for SFU graduate students at both the PhD and Masters level, who are currently writing their thesis or dissertation.

Here's your opportunity to dedicate three days to making serious progress on your dissertation or master’s thesis. Along with a comfortable, quiet working environment, snacks and lunches, you will benefit from structured time, dedicated space, professional advising and peer support—all motivating factors in that final push towards completion of your dissertation or thesis.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Tuesday, February 13, 2018 - 8:30am to 5:00pm
Wednesday, February 14, 2018 - 8:30am to 5:00pm
Thursday, February 15, 2018 - 8:30am to 5:00pm
Harbour Centre, Rm 1410-1430

Thesis Template and Resources

This demonstration introduces you to the Thesis Submission process and the Thesis Template. It will begin with an introduction to required copyright permissions from the Copyright Office at SFU, followed by a review of the overall submission process (including deadlines and supporting documentation). Additionally, SFU Library's research data specialists will give instruction on how to preserve and, if appropriate, share research data for future uses.

The technical part of the workshop will follow, where you will be walked through the resources on the website and the functionality of the thesis template.

Students are encouraged to bring their own computer and thesis document(s) to work along with the facilitator during the workshop.

Learn how to:

  • request copyright permissions
  • write in the MS Word template-based file
  • format your text using styles
  • bring text in from other documents
  • insert figures, images, and auto-numbered captions
  • generate the Table of Contents, List of Tables, List of Figures, etc.

If you’ve begun writing, send your document to theses@sfu.ca in advance of the workshop; one might be used in demonstrating the Library’s thesis template. After the session, the formatted document will be returned in which the student can continue his/her work.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Wednesday, February 7, 2018 - 10:30am to 12:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons
Thursday, March 8, 2018 - 1:30pm to 3:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons
Thursday, April 12, 2018 - 10:30am to 12:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons