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Research Commons: Workshops for graduate students & postdoctoral fellows

The Research Commons is pleased to offer you a range of workshops. Register for upcoming workshops. Search by date in our workshops calendar.

If you do not see the topic(s) you are interested in and/or would like a specialized workshop for yourself and a group of colleagues, send a request to research-commons@sfu.ca.

SFU values diversity and is committed to inclusion. If you require any disability related accommodations in order to fully access and participate in our workshops and/or events, please contact us directly at library-workshops@sfu.ca. Please contact us as soon as possible as some accommodations will require lead time to arrange (i.e. CART, ASL)

All in a Day

All in a Day: Research Roadmap - is a suite of our most popular workshops for graduate students and postdoctoral fellows. Mid-morning refreshments will be served at 11:00am

Next semester's workshops will be posted soon.

Digital Humanities

Building better "Galleries, Libraries, Archives and Museum Labs"

Speaker: Mahendra Mahey, British Library Labs Manager

Description:

The British Library is one of the largest national libraries in the world and is creating and storing millions of digital items every year such as digitised books, newspapers, maps, sheet music, manuscripts, audio / TV recordings as well as born digital archived websites, personal digital archives, electronic books, radio, performances, and artworks. This incredible range of digital material is having a profound effect on the way our libraries are supporting those who want to use digital content and methods in their work. What new facts will scholars discover when they analyse thousands of digitised books computationally using data-mining techniques? What are the challenges and solutions for libraries to build systems and services that provide seamless access to its digital material from a radio recording to newspaper story? What are the practical experiences of working on digital crowdsourcing projects, and how is machine learning helping libraries to unlock new information hidden in its digital archives? Can we use digital technologies to visualise and shine light on a library’s holdings, and unearth unusual and surprising findings artistically?
 
Mahendra will give a brief overview of digital collections and data being made available through British Library Labs (BL Labs) and examine how some of them have been re-used by making connections and collaborating with digital researchers, artists, entrepreneurs, educators, curators and librarians around the world through a range of innovative projects, research questions and engagement activities. He will highlight the myths and assumptions many make about libraries and address the significant issues and challenges they face when working with digital collections and data (e.g. legal, technical, human etc.). He will reflect on lessons he has learned over nearly two decades of working in Further and Higher Education, suggesting the types of digital research that could bring significant benefit and impact to the way libraries in particular may work into the future.
 
To conclude, Mahendra will report back on an exciting international support network that he is starting to build with colleagues around the world. This community is bringing national, state, university and public Galleries, Libraries, Archives and Museums together that either had, are planning or already have experimental digital "GLAM Labs" which encourage their users to re-use their digital collections and data. The group are already providing support to each other, sharing expertise, knowledge and experience and are pooling resources together in order to build better innovative digital "GLAM Labs" that bring value to their organisations and users well into the future. They also intend to publish a practical open access book in 2019 about "Building better GLAM Labs" which will include a description of the landscape of digital "GLAM Labs" worldwide and provide advice and guidance for libraries who are in process of setting up or currently running digital "GLAM Labs".

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Monday, February 25, 2019 - 10:30am to 12:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7200

British Library Labs Workshop: A hands-on data exploration & challenge

Speaker: Mahendra Mahey, British Library Labs Manager

Description:

  • you want to understand some of the challenges of working with cultural heritage data in a large national library such as the British Library?
  • Do you want to explore and get some 'hands-on' experience of working with the British Library’s digital collections and data?
  • Do you want to leave a ‘legacy’ of being a data-set author/creator/curator on the British Library’s data-set platform?
  • Do you have some digital literacy in using familiar data exploration tools such as Microsoft Excel (see 'GUIDANCE FOR THIS WORKSHOP' below)?
If the answer is 'Yes' to any of these, then this workshop could be for you!
 
Mahendra Mahey, manager of British Library Labs (BL Labs) will examine some of the BL’s digital collections/data & discuss challenges he has had in making the BL's cultural heritage data available openly or onsite at the British Library.
 
Mahendra will invite you to explore data-sets at your leisure, setting a challenge for those of you are interested, skilled in exploring, finding patterns and grouping data. They could become data-set authors/creators of derived data-sets, based on pre-existing digital collections/data provided on the day or already available on the British Library website.
 
The workshop will conclude with reflections from you and possibly highlighting a number derived data-sets that were generated by participants on the day that could now potentially exist on the British Library website. If selected, these new derived data-sets will be attributed with the creators' / authors' details and each will have its own cite-able Digital Object Identifier (D.O.I). These new data-sets would then be available for reuse by any researcher in the world.
 
GUIDANCE FOR THIS WORKSHOP
We strongly recommend you come to this workshop with an appropriate device such as a laptop pre-installed with appropriate tools to analyse different kinds of data-sets, e.g. Microsoft Excel may work with smaller data-sets such as metadata (see other data exploration tools below). If you don't have one, and would still like to attend, please request to 'pair up' with someone who is willing to share and has already signed up.
 
Other data exploration tools include: Notepad++ (e.g. for viewing text and XML); Open Refine (e.g. for cleaning data); Tableau Public (e.g. for visualising data); Google Fusion Tables (e.g for visualising geo-spatial data); Spacy (e.g. for text and data mining), RStudio (an open source Statistical package), MATLAB (data analysis tool) & NLTK (Natural Language processing). 
 
Please note that this workshop is NOT about training you in using any of these tools, just tools you may be already familiar with to explore and find patterns in our data.
 
Datatypes you may be examining in this workshop could include: .ZIP, .PDF, .TXT, .CSV, .TSV. .XLS, .XLSX, RDF, .nt, XML (TEI, ALTO and bespoke), .JSON, .JPG, .JPEG, .TIFF and .WARC
 
Please ensure you are able to read these files on your device before the workshop if you are interested in exploring them during our session.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Monday, February 25, 2019 - 1:30pm to 4:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Wosk Seminar Room 7100 (inside Special Collections)

Introduction to Spatial Data in Humanities: The Spatial Elements of Textual Analysis

Many humanities researchers have some form of geographical information included in their research, such as objects, images, or texts from or about a particular place; narratives about a person’s movement or a place’s change over time; or information about networks of people or organizations. Whether places and spaces are at the heart of your research or are a part of it, mapping can help answer research questions and generate new ones by visualizing your data in new ways. It can help tell a story about place or space. This two-part workshop series will help humanities researchers map their place-based research with ArcGIS.

The Spatial Elements of Textual Analysis
The first workshop will cover the nuts and bolts of getting started mapping with ArcGIS. We will discuss how to extract data from your research, get it ready for analysis, and upload it into ArcGIS. The workshop will help humanities researchers explore and map the spatial elements of their research with ArcGIS.

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • extract data from their research;
  • get their data ready for spatial analysis;
  • upload data into ArcGIS Online;
  • use some basic mapping techniques with ArcGIS Online.

Software: ArcGIS Online (participants will not need their own computer)

Workshop page (SFU Canvas): GIS workshops page includes workshop descriptions and suggested streams for different disciplines, handouts, slides, and example datasets

Creating Story Maps
The second workshop will cover spatial analysis - the potential applications of your geographic information. We will demonstrate the analytic functions included in ArcGIS and discuss how to create context for your spatial data. We will also introduce Story Maps, an app that helps turn place-based information into narratives with a combination of maps, images, and text. Note: for this workshop, we will assume that you have already attended the first workshop or are comfortable with the material covered there.

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • create a Story Map;
  • extract spatial context from text.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Monday, March 4, 2019 - 1:00pm to 3:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Lab 2105

Introduction to Spatial Data in Humanities: Creating Story Maps

Many humanities researchers have some form of geographical information included in their research, such as objects, images, or texts from or about a particular place; narratives about a person’s movement or a place’s change over time; or information about networks of people or organizations. Whether places and spaces are at the heart of your research or are a part of it, mapping can help answer research questions and generate new ones by visualizing your data in new ways. It can help tell a story about place or space. This two-part workshop series will help humanities researchers map their place-based research with ArcGIS.

The Spatial Elements of Textual Analysis
The first workshop will cover the nuts and bolts of getting started mapping with ArcGIS. We will discuss how to extract data from your research, get it ready for analysis, and upload it into ArcGIS. The workshop will help humanities researchers explore and map the spatial elements of their research with ArcGIS.

Software: ArcGIS Online (participants will not need their own computer)

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • extract data from their research;
  • get their data ready for spatial analysis;
  • upload data into ArcGIS Online;
  • use some basic mapping techniques with ArcGIS Online.

Creating Story Maps
The second workshop will cover spatial analysis - the potential applications of your geographic information. We will demonstrate the analytic functions included in ArcGIS and discuss how to create context for your spatial data. We will also introduce Story Maps, an app that helps turn place-based information into narratives with a combination of maps, images, and text. Note: for this workshop, we will assume that you have already attended the first workshop or are comfortable with the material covered there.

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • create a Story Map;
  • extract spatial context from text.

Software: ArcGIS Online (participants will not need their own computer)

Workshop page (SFU Canvas): GIS workshops page includes workshop descriptions and suggested streams for different disciplines, handouts, slides, and example datasets

    Upcoming Workshops

    Dates Location
    Tuesday, March 5, 2019 - 1:00pm to 3:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Lab 2105

    EAL/ESL

    Academic Writing for Graduate Students (EAL)

    Academic Writing for Graduate Students is a non-credit, 10-week co-curricular course designed for graduate students for whom English is an additional language (EAL).  You will learn how to apply your analytical skills to the discourses of your chosen disciplines and to explore how effective academic writing in Western scholarly tradition is achieved in order to position yourself as junior scholars in your chosen academic communities. 

    The course is offered as a collaboration between the Student Learning Commons, Research Commons, and The Center for English Learning, Teaching and Research (CELLTR).

    Required textbook (supplied)

    Swales, John M., & Feak, Christine B. (2011). Academic Writing for Graduate Students: Essential Tasks and Skills (3rd Edition). Ann Arbor: U of Michigan Press (ISBN: 978-0472-03475-8).

    To support for the on-going development of students' academic writing skills, the textbook will be provided free of charge to registered students (for this first course offering only), compliments of the Library and The Centre of English Language Learning, Teaching, and Research (CELLTR).


    Spring 2019 term course dates, times, and location:

    January 14 - March 27, 2019
    Mondays and Wednesdays, 10:30 AM-12:20 PM
    Bennett Library, Research Commons, Room 7010

    **NOTE: No classes during Reading Break (February 18-24, 2019)

    Upcoming Workshops

    Dates Location
    Monday, January 14, 2019 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Wednesday, January 16, 2019 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Monday, January 21, 2019 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Wednesday, January 23, 2019 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Monday, January 28, 2019 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Wednesday, January 30, 2019 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Monday, February 4, 2019 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Wednesday, February 6, 2019 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Monday, February 11, 2019 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Wednesday, February 13, 2019 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Monday, February 25, 2019 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Wednesday, February 27, 2019 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Monday, March 4, 2019 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Wednesday, March 6, 2019 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Monday, March 11, 2019 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Wednesday, March 13, 2019 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Monday, March 18, 2019 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Wednesday, March 20, 2019 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Monday, March 25, 2019 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Wednesday, March 27, 2019 - 10:30am to 12:20pm
    Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

    Learning

    Next semester's workshops will be posted soon.

    New Year's Resolution Writing Spectacular

    Get 2019 off to a spectacular start! Join us for a full day of workshops and writing support for graduate students and post-doctoral fellows on Friday January 11 at SFU Harbour Centre in Vancouver. Register for as many workshops as you choose and stay for our dedicated writing time in the afternoon. Morning and afternoon refreshments will be served.

    Next semester's workshops will be posted soon.

    Publishing Symposium

    Are you interested in publishing your academic work, extending the reach of your research, and developing your online presence? Join us for a one day Publishing Symposium. Register for one, two, or three workshops below and get everything you need to prepare to publish and share the word about your research.

    Next semester's workshops will be posted soon.

    Research data management

    FOI (Freedom of Information) 101

    Have you ever filed an FOI request that is met with bureaucratic obstacles, outrageous fee estimates, or documents with blanked-out pages? Do you want to file an FOI request, but are unsure about the best way to get the documents you want? This interactive workshop will provide newcomers with an applied introduction to FOI, covering preliminary research, request preparation, wording, and filing, troubleshooting requests-in-progress, and general tips that should improve results. Plenty of time will be set aside for questions and discussion.
     

    Speaker: Mike Larsen

    Mike Larsen is President of the BC Freedom of Information and Privacy Association (FIPA) and Co-Chair of the Criminology Department at Kwantlen Polytechnic University. He teaches courses on socio-legal studies, criminological theory, police accountability, and surveillance and privacy issues, and his research deals with contestations around government secrecy, public accountability, and the right to know.

    Upcoming Workshops

    Dates Location
    Monday, March 11, 2019 - 1:30pm to 4:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7200

    Statistics Canada Aboriginal Census

    This presentation will provide you with an overview of findings from the recent data release of the 2017 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS) and the Aboriginal Peoples Survey – Nunavut Inuit Supplement (APS-NIS). It will present findings about the labour market experiences of First Nations people living off reserve, Métis, and Inuit from the APS, and findings about Nunavut Inuit and government employment from the APS-NIS.

    The APS provides key statistics on labour, education, language, housing and health to inform policy and programming activities aimed at improving the well-being of Aboriginal people.

     

    Upcoming Workshops

    Dates Location
    Wednesday, March 13, 2019 - 10:30am to 12:00pm Burnaby, SFU's Big Data Hub (Applied Science Building - Flexible Meeting Room ASB 10908)

    What is the Open Science Framework (OSF)?

    The OSF is a free, open-source web app that manages research projects at all stages of the research lifecycle. It is used for documentation, file storage, versioning, collaboration, and it connects the various tools researchers currently use. The OSF is produced by the Center for Open Science (COS) and has over 60,000 users across various academic disciplines. Attend the workshop to learn more and explore the OSF.

    Upcoming Workshops

    Dates Location
    Friday, March 15, 2019 - 9:30am to 11:00am Burnaby, SFU's Big Data Hub (Applied Science Building - Flexible Meeting Room ASB 10908)

    Research programming

    Data Analysis with R

    In this workshop we will focus on collecting data from a online source, follow by cleaning and parsing data for analysis and visualization. We will explore a few libraries in R, including tidyverse, rvest and stringr for data manipulation and analysis.

    Requirements

    • Intermediate knowledge in R;
    • Dependency: R, RStudio,
    • Library: tidyverse, rvest, stringr

    -------------------

    Note: This workshop is organized and facilitated by SciProg. SciProg—short for Scientific Programming Study Group—is dedicated to building a community of SFU researchers who perform computational data analysis as part of their academic work. SciProg promotes skill sharing and collaboration by (1) organizing 60 to 90-minute interactive workshops covering a wide range of software tools, (2) providing Q&A sessions for peer-to-peer assistance and collaboration, and (3) bringing researchers together at social events like Hacky Hours.

    Upcoming Workshops

    Dates Location
    Tuesday, February 26, 2019 - 1:00pm to 2:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

    Principles of Data Visualization and Interpretation

    This workshop will cover the fundamentals of data visualization design and data storytelling. The topics covered will include perception, reasoning strategies, visual thinking, best practices, and narrative structures. As this is a workshop, a data visualization design activity will also be included at the end.

    Requirements

    Participants are expected to be at least somewhat familiar with rudimentary exploratory data analysis and statistical thinking. As the exercise is going to be primarily focused on designing data visualizations, participants are encouraged to explore sketching using pen and paper, however the workshop will also accommodate data visualization tools such as Tableau.

    -------------------

    Note: This workshop is organized and facilitated by SciProg. SciProg—short for Scientific Programming Study Group—is dedicated to building a community of SFU researchers who perform computational data analysis as part of their academic work. SciProg promotes skill sharing and collaboration by (1) organizing 60 to 90-minute interactive workshops covering a wide range of software tools, (2) providing Q&A sessions for peer-to-peer assistance and collaboration, and (3) bringing researchers together at social events like Hacky Hours.

    Upcoming Workshops

    Dates Location
    Tuesday, March 12, 2019 - 3:00pm to 4:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

    Introduction to Time Series Analysis using R

    In this workshop participants will go through a brief introduction to time series analysis using ARIMA models in R. This can be applied in business forecasting, business decision-making, stock analysis, medicine, etc.

    Requirements

    • Basic knowledge of R programming language
    • Data analysis practices: parsing, cleaning, analysing data
    • Install R, R studio along with libraries TSA.

    -------------------

    Note: This workshop is organized and facilitated by SciProg. SciProg—short for Scientific Programming Study Group—is dedicated to building a community of SFU researchers who perform computational data analysis as part of their academic work. SciProg promotes skill sharing and collaboration by (1) organizing 60 to 90-minute interactive workshops covering a wide range of software tools, (2) providing Q&A sessions for peer-to-peer assistance and collaboration, and (3) bringing researchers together at social events like Hacky Hours.

    Upcoming Workshops

    Dates Location
    Tuesday, March 26, 2019 - 3:00pm to 4:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

    Intro to web data scraping with Python

    This workshop will cover downloading data from online databases using the requests Python library. Participants will also practice parsing obtained information in JSON and CSV format. Data will then be used for analysis and visualization.

    Requirements

    Intermediate knowledge of Python programming language:

    • function definition,
    • testing and
    • implementation.

    Familiarity with pandas dataframes and matplotlib.

    -------------------

    Note: This workshop is organized and facilitated by SciProg. SciProg—short for Scientific Programming Study Group—is dedicated to building a community of SFU researchers who perform computational data analysis as part of their academic work. SciProg promotes skill sharing and collaboration by (1) organizing 60 to 90-minute interactive workshops covering a wide range of software tools, (2) providing Q&A sessions for peer-to-peer assistance and collaboration, and (3) bringing researchers together at social events like Hacky Hours.

    Upcoming Workshops

    Dates Location
    Tuesday, April 2, 2019 - 3:00pm to 4:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

    Research software

    Citation Management

    Next semester's workshops will be posted soon.

    GIS

    Mapping Socio-Demographic Data in QGIS

    This workshop is intended as a gentle introduction to GIS. No prior GIS or ArcMap experience is needed. The emphasis is on the novice user who is curious about how to use GIS software for their research.

    The workshop will discuss different types of geospatial data sources and alternative GIS tools (e.g. SimplyAnalytics) and then provide a hands-on workshop focused on creating a map in ArcMap using 2016 Census data, Vancouver neighbourhood boundaries, homeless shelter and non-market housing point datasets accessible through the City of Vancouver Open Data Catalogue.

    The Lab is equipped with QGIS so you don't need to bring a laptop, although you are welcome to bring one if you would prefer.

     

    Upcoming Workshops

    Dates Location
    Wednesday, February 27, 2019 - 9:30am to 11:00am Burnaby, Bennett Library, Lab 2105

    Introduction to Spatial Data in Humanities: The Spatial Elements of Textual Analysis

    Many humanities researchers have some form of geographical information included in their research, such as objects, images, or texts from or about a particular place; narratives about a person’s movement or a place’s change over time; or information about networks of people or organizations. Whether places and spaces are at the heart of your research or are a part of it, mapping can help answer research questions and generate new ones by visualizing your data in new ways. It can help tell a story about place or space. This two-part workshop series will help humanities researchers map their place-based research with ArcGIS.

    The Spatial Elements of Textual Analysis
    The first workshop will cover the nuts and bolts of getting started mapping with ArcGIS. We will discuss how to extract data from your research, get it ready for analysis, and upload it into ArcGIS. The workshop will help humanities researchers explore and map the spatial elements of their research with ArcGIS.

    By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

    • extract data from their research;
    • get their data ready for spatial analysis;
    • upload data into ArcGIS Online;
    • use some basic mapping techniques with ArcGIS Online.

    Software: ArcGIS Online (participants will not need their own computer)

    Workshop page (SFU Canvas): GIS workshops page includes workshop descriptions and suggested streams for different disciplines, handouts, slides, and example datasets

    Creating Story Maps
    The second workshop will cover spatial analysis - the potential applications of your geographic information. We will demonstrate the analytic functions included in ArcGIS and discuss how to create context for your spatial data. We will also introduce Story Maps, an app that helps turn place-based information into narratives with a combination of maps, images, and text. Note: for this workshop, we will assume that you have already attended the first workshop or are comfortable with the material covered there.

    By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

    • create a Story Map;
    • extract spatial context from text.

    Upcoming Workshops

    Dates Location
    Monday, March 4, 2019 - 1:00pm to 3:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Lab 2105

    Introduction to Spatial Data in Humanities: Creating Story Maps

    Many humanities researchers have some form of geographical information included in their research, such as objects, images, or texts from or about a particular place; narratives about a person’s movement or a place’s change over time; or information about networks of people or organizations. Whether places and spaces are at the heart of your research or are a part of it, mapping can help answer research questions and generate new ones by visualizing your data in new ways. It can help tell a story about place or space. This two-part workshop series will help humanities researchers map their place-based research with ArcGIS.

    The Spatial Elements of Textual Analysis
    The first workshop will cover the nuts and bolts of getting started mapping with ArcGIS. We will discuss how to extract data from your research, get it ready for analysis, and upload it into ArcGIS. The workshop will help humanities researchers explore and map the spatial elements of their research with ArcGIS.

    Software: ArcGIS Online (participants will not need their own computer)

    By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

    • extract data from their research;
    • get their data ready for spatial analysis;
    • upload data into ArcGIS Online;
    • use some basic mapping techniques with ArcGIS Online.

    Creating Story Maps
    The second workshop will cover spatial analysis - the potential applications of your geographic information. We will demonstrate the analytic functions included in ArcGIS and discuss how to create context for your spatial data. We will also introduce Story Maps, an app that helps turn place-based information into narratives with a combination of maps, images, and text. Note: for this workshop, we will assume that you have already attended the first workshop or are comfortable with the material covered there.

    By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

    • create a Story Map;
    • extract spatial context from text.

    Software: ArcGIS Online (participants will not need their own computer)

    Workshop page (SFU Canvas): GIS workshops page includes workshop descriptions and suggested streams for different disciplines, handouts, slides, and example datasets

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Tuesday, March 5, 2019 - 1:00pm to 3:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Lab 2105

      Geoprocessing in ArcGIS

      The analysis of place-based (or spatial) data requires a basic understanding of how to process the data. For example, what are the routes taken by Anna’s hummingbird (Calypte anna) during winter migration and where do their routes overlap with predator territory? If we have data on the locations of Anna’s hummingbird and their predators, we could process their network (or routes) and then analyze the overlap with predator territory.

      Researchers in various disciplines will find this workshop helpful as an introduction to basic geoprocessing tools and workflow automation in ArcGIS. In this workshop, participants will learn to run basic and advanced geoprocessing tools using Python and an automated workflow process tool called Model Builder. During the workshop, participants will:

      • explore different data formats that work with ArcGIS;
      • use tools to their full extent in ArcMap;
      • learn about kernel density analysis;
      • automate geoprocessing tools; and
      • use Python in IDLE and in ArcMap.

      Software requirements:

      Participants will need to bring their own computer, running the Windows operating system. This workshop requires the use of ArcGIS Desktop, which is available for download and can be installed on Windows operating systems only. Instructions on installing ArcGIS Desktop and other necessary information will be sent out to participants closer to the workshop date.

      Prerequisite:

      This workshop assumes prerequisite knowledge of introductory Python. Please contact data-services@sfu.ca if you do not have previous experience with Python as we may be able to recommend other self-guided tutorials.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Tuesday, March 12, 2019 - 9:30am to 4:30pm Burnaby, SFU's Big Data Hub (Applied Science Building - Flexible Meeting Room ASB 10908)

      Introduction to Web Cartography

      Take your cartography to the next level by making your maps interactive and online! An interactive map helps your map viewers explore your data with greater detail and control. In this workshop, we’ll use open source software to turn our shapefiles into interactive online maps.

      Learning Outcomes: By the end of this workshop you will be able to:

      • Export data from QGIS to a web-readable format (GeoJSON)
      • Create a Leaflet-based web map
      • Customize the styling in that web map

      Software: QGIS, Leaflet, HTML & CSS

      Core Competencies: web mapping, cartography

      Pre-Requisite: Some familiarity with ArcGIS or QGIS, and have used/dabbled in HTML and CSS but may not be fluent in them.

      Workshop page (SFU Canvas): GIS workshops page includes workshop descriptions and suggested streams for different disciplines, handouts, slides, and example datasets

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Monday, March 18, 2019 - 2:00pm to 4:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Lab 2105

      Advanced GIS: Raster Data Analysis

      Raster data is continuous, pixelated data. For example, aerial photographs, LIDAR data, and digital elevation models store information as raster data. In contrast, vector data is discrete and is stored as geometric objects: points, lines and polygons. The tools available to you, and the kind of analysis you can conduct, with raster data are different than those for vector data. This session will focus on working with raster data in ArcGIS.

      By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

      • distinguish between different types of raster data;
      • work with digital elevation models (DEMs);
      • explore raster surface data (hill shade, contour, aspect data);
      • create and work with mosaic datasets.

      Software: ArcGIS Desktop 10.6 (participants will not need their own computer)

      Workshop page (SFU Canvas): GIS workshops page includes workshop descriptions and suggested streams for different disciplines, handouts, slides, and example datasets

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Tuesday, March 19, 2019 - 2:30pm to 4:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Lab 2105

      Intro to Geospatial Data with R

      The lessons in this workshop will cover how to open, work with, and plot vector and raster-format spatial data in R.

      Additional topics include:

      • working with spatial metadata (extent and coordinate reference systems),
      • reprojecting spatial data,
      • and working with raster time series data.

      By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

      • import and export raster and vector data from R;
      • analyze and edit raster and vector data;
      • explore spatio-temporal data in R.

      This full-day workshop will follow the Data Carpentries' syllabus.

      Prerequisites:

      Software requirements:

      • Participants will need to bring their own laptops with the most recent version of R and Rstudio installed. For installation instructions and to download the data used in this lesson, see the workshop homepage.

      Workshop page (SFU Canvas): GIS workshops page includes workshop descriptions and suggested streams for different disciplines, handouts, slides, and example datasets

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Friday, March 22, 2019 - 9:00am to 5:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 3008

      Python

      Introduction to Python

      Python is a popular language for scientific computing, and great for general-purpose programming as well. In fact, almost everyone who uses Python likes it so much they get upset about having to learn any other programming language.  This hands-on workshop will cover basic concepts and tools, including program design, version control, data management, and task automation. This workshop uses curricula from Software Carpentry, whose mission is to help researchers get more work done in less time and with less pain by teaching them basic lab skills for scientific computing.  It also provides a good technical basis for the two-day GIS workshop which will follow, which is an introduction to automated geoprocessing using Python to perform analysis with ArcGIS. Given this, you might be able to do St. Patrick one better, and with the power of Python, drive the snakes back into Ireland!

      Software requirements:

      Participants will need to bring their own computer. Instructions on installing Python and other necessary information will be sent out to participants closer to the workshop date.

      Prerequisite:

      This workshop is designed for people with no background in Python.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Monday, March 11, 2019 - 9:30am to 4:30pm Burnaby, SFU's Big Data Hub (Applied Science Building - Flexible Meeting Room ASB 10908)

      Geoprocessing in ArcGIS

      The analysis of place-based (or spatial) data requires a basic understanding of how to process the data. For example, what are the routes taken by Anna’s hummingbird (Calypte anna) during winter migration and where do their routes overlap with predator territory? If we have data on the locations of Anna’s hummingbird and their predators, we could process their network (or routes) and then analyze the overlap with predator territory.

      Researchers in various disciplines will find this workshop helpful as an introduction to basic geoprocessing tools and workflow automation in ArcGIS. In this workshop, participants will learn to run basic and advanced geoprocessing tools using Python and an automated workflow process tool called Model Builder. During the workshop, participants will:

      • explore different data formats that work with ArcGIS;
      • use tools to their full extent in ArcMap;
      • learn about kernel density analysis;
      • automate geoprocessing tools; and
      • use Python in IDLE and in ArcMap.

      Software requirements:

      Participants will need to bring their own computer, running the Windows operating system. This workshop requires the use of ArcGIS Desktop, which is available for download and can be installed on Windows operating systems only. Instructions on installing ArcGIS Desktop and other necessary information will be sent out to participants closer to the workshop date.

      Prerequisite:

      This workshop assumes prerequisite knowledge of introductory Python. Please contact data-services@sfu.ca if you do not have previous experience with Python as we may be able to recommend other self-guided tutorials.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Tuesday, March 12, 2019 - 9:30am to 4:30pm Burnaby, SFU's Big Data Hub (Applied Science Building - Flexible Meeting Room ASB 10908)

      Intro to web data scraping with Python

      This workshop will cover downloading data from online databases using the requests Python library. Participants will also practice parsing obtained information in JSON and CSV format. Data will then be used for analysis and visualization.

      Requirements

      Intermediate knowledge of Python programming language:

      • function definition,
      • testing and
      • implementation.

      Familiarity with pandas dataframes and matplotlib.

      -------------------

      Note: This workshop is organized and facilitated by SciProg. SciProg—short for Scientific Programming Study Group—is dedicated to building a community of SFU researchers who perform computational data analysis as part of their academic work. SciProg promotes skill sharing and collaboration by (1) organizing 60 to 90-minute interactive workshops covering a wide range of software tools, (2) providing Q&A sessions for peer-to-peer assistance and collaboration, and (3) bringing researchers together at social events like Hacky Hours.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Tuesday, April 2, 2019 - 3:00pm to 4:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

      Qualitative Data Analysis

      Advanced NVivo for Windows

      Need help moving forward with your qualitative data analysis? If you’re already comfortable with bringing in documents and coding them, you’re ready to move on to analyzing your material. In this hands-on workshop, Graduate Peer NVivo Facilitators will walk you through visualizations and queries using sample data and may be able to address other topics depending on the needs of the group.

      PREREQUISITE:
      Before registering for this workshop, you must be familiar with coding in NVivo and/or have already taken the Introduction to NVivo workshop.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Tuesday, February 26, 2019 - 1:00pm to 2:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Lab 4009

      Advanced NVivo for Mac

      Need help moving forward with your qualitative data analysis? If you’re already comfortable with bringing in documents and coding them, you’re ready to move on to analyzing your material. In this hands-on workshop, Graduate Peer NVivo Facilitators will walk you through visualizations and queries using sample data and may be able to address other topics depending on the needs of the group.

      This is a BYOL workshop: Bring Your Own Laptop, with the latest version of NVivo for Mac installed on it.

      PREREQUISITE:
      Before registering for this workshop, you must be familiar with coding in NVivo and/or have already taken the Introduction to NVivo workshop.

       

       

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Thursday, February 28, 2019 - 9:30am to 11:00am Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

      Introduction to NVivo for Windows

      NVivo is a qualitative data analysis software program, but what does that mean -- and what does it mean for your research? Find out what NVivo is, when to use it, and how to get started.

      In this hands-on introductory workshop, you'll take a tour of the NVivo software environment, using sample data. You’ll be introduced to NVivo’s functions and you’ll leave equipped with the basic info you need to begin working with NVivo. Topics introduced may include importing files and beginning coding.

      This workshop is suitable for those with little or no experience using NVivo or other qualitative data analysis software.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Thursday, March 7, 2019 - 5:30pm to 7:00pm Vancouver, Harbour Centre, Lab 1350

      Making Literature Reviews Easier with NVivo for Windows

      This interactive workshop introduces importing and coding of literature review materials and key tools that can be particularly helpful when reviewing literature in your area of research.

      Topics covered include:

      • introducing NVivo and setting up a project
      • working with your information
      • identifying themes, topics and ideas and collecting data to support them
      • using tools such as text search query, matrix coding query, and Framework Matrix.

      What will you achieve from this session? You will have the knowledge to set up a literature review in NVivo, and begin to work with your information. You will also be able to use NVivo to organize your content and begin to identify themes, topics or ideas. It is appropriate for those who have had some experience with NVivo. For more information about NVivo at SFU, please visit NVivo Software for Research Analysis.

      Participants should also have some familiarity with citation management software (Zotero, Mendeley, Refworks, EndNote, etc). Zotero will be used during this workshop.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Wednesday, March 13, 2019 - 9:30am to 11:00am Burnaby, Bennett Library, Lab 4009

      R (Software)

      Introduction to R for Non-Science Majors (2-day workshop)

      This workshop is designed for non-science students interested in the statistical computing program R. No prior knowledge of R is required. Often data outside of the sciences includes textual data, such as a corpus or series of surveys. In this workshop we’ll learn how to process textual data in R, as well as the basic skills to start analyzing it. Specific topics covered include the R environment (directories, workspace, scripts, and packages), data structures (vector, matrix, data frames, lists), and the beginnings of simple data analysis (built-in statistical packages, elementary statistics, etc.).

      Note: Workshop participants will need to bring their own laptops, with R and RStudio installed prior to attending the workshop.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Saturday, February 16, 2019 - 9:30am to 4:30pm
      Sunday, February 17, 2019 - 9:30am to 4:30pm
      Burnaby, SFU's Big Data Hub (Applied Science Building - Flexible Meeting Room ASB 10908)

      Introduction to R (2-day workshop)

      This two day workshop introduces the programming language R.  R is an open-source, widely used, and increasingly popular tool for statistical and data analyses, text mining, geospatial analysis, modelling, and a growing number of other applications. No prior knowledge is required. Students will learn the skills needed to start analyzing their own data.

      The topics covered include:

      • the R environment (directories, workspace, scripts, and packages),
      • simple commands to get you started,
      • data structures (vector, matrix, data frames, lists),
      • basic data analysis tools (built-in statistical packages, plotting, etc.)

       As time permits, an introduction to functions may also be covered.

      Requirements:

      • Participants need to bring a laptop with the latest versions of R and RStudio installed.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Monday, February 25, 2019 - 9:30am to 4:30pm
      Tuesday, February 26, 2019 - 9:30am to 4:30pm
      Burnaby, SFU's Big Data Hub (Applied Science Building - Flexible Meeting Room ASB 10908)

      Data Analysis with R

      In this workshop we will focus on collecting data from a online source, follow by cleaning and parsing data for analysis and visualization. We will explore a few libraries in R, including tidyverse, rvest and stringr for data manipulation and analysis.

      Requirements

      • Intermediate knowledge in R;
      • Dependency: R, RStudio,
      • Library: tidyverse, rvest, stringr

      -------------------

      Note: This workshop is organized and facilitated by SciProg. SciProg—short for Scientific Programming Study Group—is dedicated to building a community of SFU researchers who perform computational data analysis as part of their academic work. SciProg promotes skill sharing and collaboration by (1) organizing 60 to 90-minute interactive workshops covering a wide range of software tools, (2) providing Q&A sessions for peer-to-peer assistance and collaboration, and (3) bringing researchers together at social events like Hacky Hours.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Tuesday, February 26, 2019 - 1:00pm to 2:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

      Use dplyr to effectively handle data in R

      This workshop for intermediate R users will show you how to leverage dplyr (a package in tidyverse) to more effectively filter, transform, and aggregate your data. If you've used R before, then you know that getting base R to transform data into a form needed for your analysis is usually a challenge, with complex blocks of code to perform what should be simple operations. Luckily for us, dplyr is designed to help easily express these operations so that what is essentially a simple data transformation only requires simple code.
       
      This workshop assumes that you are already comfortable in base R. For example, you should be able to: 
      • Import data from a CSV or text file 
      • Extract and create columns in a data frame, and filter rows according to different conditions 
      • Write an R script that can run on its own without manual user intervention.

      By the end of the workshop you will be able to: 

      • Use the primary dplyr functions for selecting, mutating, filtering, summarizing, and re-ordering data 
      • Recognize existing complicated base R code blocks and simplify them down using dplyr 
      • Use tidyr (a tidyverse package) to easily reshape data both to and from long and wide formats. 

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Thursday, March 7, 2019 - 2:00pm to 5:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

      Write your own personal R package

      This workshop for intermediate R users will teach you how to write your own R package. Everyone has functions that they've written that they reuse across different projects, and keeping track of them all and the slight differences between them is tiresome, let alone copy-pasting and then modifying yet another version. By writing your own R package you can properly document and access these functions from one place, and even share your own package with others.  
       
      This workshop assumes that you are already comfortable in base R. For example, you should be able to: 
      • Write for-loops and if-statements 
      • Write an R script that can run on its own without manual user intervention
      • Write your own function (although we suggest that you already know how to do this, it's not required and will be briefly covered). 

      By the end of the workshop you will be able to:

      • Write your own functions for use in your scripts 
      • Use RStudio to write a package containing functions you want 
      • Write help files for your functions that are accessible using ?YourFunctionNameHere
      • Include sample datasets in your package 
      • Export your package to share with others
       

       

       

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Wednesday, March 13, 2019 - 1:30pm to 4:30pm Burnaby, SFU's Big Data Hub (Applied Science Building - Flexible Meeting Room ASB 10908)

      Intro to Geospatial Data with R

      The lessons in this workshop will cover how to open, work with, and plot vector and raster-format spatial data in R.

      Additional topics include:

      • working with spatial metadata (extent and coordinate reference systems),
      • reprojecting spatial data,
      • and working with raster time series data.

      By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

      • import and export raster and vector data from R;
      • analyze and edit raster and vector data;
      • explore spatio-temporal data in R.

      This full-day workshop will follow the Data Carpentries' syllabus.

      Prerequisites:

      Software requirements:

      • Participants will need to bring their own laptops with the most recent version of R and Rstudio installed. For installation instructions and to download the data used in this lesson, see the workshop homepage.

      Workshop page (SFU Canvas): GIS workshops page includes workshop descriptions and suggested streams for different disciplines, handouts, slides, and example datasets

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Friday, March 22, 2019 - 9:00am to 5:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 3008

      Write parallel code in R to improve performance

      This workshop for intermediate R users will show you how to leverage some of the parallel packages in R to run tasks concurrently, or parallel to each other. This means that your code can complete faster using the additional CPU cores found on most computers, allowing you to spend more time working and less time waiting. 
       
      This workshop assumes that you are already comfortable in base R. For example, you should be able to: 
      • Write for-loops and if-statements 
      • Repeatedly run some analysis that in total takes minutes or hours to complete 
      • Write an R script that can run on its own without manual user intervention. 
      By the end of the workshop you will be able to:
      • Write your own functions for use in your scripts 
      • Recognize when a task can or cannot be made parallel 
      • Understand why parallel code is more difficult to write, and how to write it 
      • Recognize several popular parallel code packages and understand the style of coding required for each one
      • Write parallel code where possible.

       

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Friday, March 22, 2019 - 9:30am to 12:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

      Introduction to Time Series Analysis using R

      In this workshop participants will go through a brief introduction to time series analysis using ARIMA models in R. This can be applied in business forecasting, business decision-making, stock analysis, medicine, etc.

      Requirements

      • Basic knowledge of R programming language
      • Data analysis practices: parsing, cleaning, analysing data
      • Install R, R studio along with libraries TSA.

      -------------------

      Note: This workshop is organized and facilitated by SciProg. SciProg—short for Scientific Programming Study Group—is dedicated to building a community of SFU researchers who perform computational data analysis as part of their academic work. SciProg promotes skill sharing and collaboration by (1) organizing 60 to 90-minute interactive workshops covering a wide range of software tools, (2) providing Q&A sessions for peer-to-peer assistance and collaboration, and (3) bringing researchers together at social events like Hacky Hours.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Tuesday, March 26, 2019 - 3:00pm to 4:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

      Statistics

      Statistics Canada Aboriginal Census

      This presentation will provide you with an overview of findings from the recent data release of the 2017 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS) and the Aboriginal Peoples Survey – Nunavut Inuit Supplement (APS-NIS). It will present findings about the labour market experiences of First Nations people living off reserve, Métis, and Inuit from the APS, and findings about Nunavut Inuit and government employment from the APS-NIS.

      The APS provides key statistics on labour, education, language, housing and health to inform policy and programming activities aimed at improving the well-being of Aboriginal people.

       

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Wednesday, March 13, 2019 - 10:30am to 12:00pm Burnaby, SFU's Big Data Hub (Applied Science Building - Flexible Meeting Room ASB 10908)

      Visual Analytics

      Principles of Data Visualization and Interpretation

      This workshop will cover the fundamentals of data visualization design and data storytelling. The topics covered will include perception, reasoning strategies, visual thinking, best practices, and narrative structures. As this is a workshop, a data visualization design activity will also be included at the end.

      Requirements

      Participants are expected to be at least somewhat familiar with rudimentary exploratory data analysis and statistical thinking. As the exercise is going to be primarily focused on designing data visualizations, participants are encouraged to explore sketching using pen and paper, however the workshop will also accommodate data visualization tools such as Tableau.

      -------------------

      Note: This workshop is organized and facilitated by SciProg. SciProg—short for Scientific Programming Study Group—is dedicated to building a community of SFU researchers who perform computational data analysis as part of their academic work. SciProg promotes skill sharing and collaboration by (1) organizing 60 to 90-minute interactive workshops covering a wide range of software tools, (2) providing Q&A sessions for peer-to-peer assistance and collaboration, and (3) bringing researchers together at social events like Hacky Hours.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Tuesday, March 12, 2019 - 3:00pm to 4:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

      Data visualization with Tableau: The painless, programming-free way to build charts and graphs

      Tableau is a data visualization tool that can help you analyze your data and illustrate the patterns and insights behind them. This interactive workshop will introduce researchers to Tableau Public, a free access version of Tableau.

      You will leave this workshop with an understanding of how to:
      • connect datasets to your Tableau workbook;
      • create a variety of basic chart types (including bar charts, line graphs, and maps);
      • use Tableau's built-in analysis features, like reference lines, trend lines and calculated fields; and
      • publish and share publication-quality interactive charts and graphs.
      Requirements: Participants will need to bring their own laptop and charger. Before the workshop, please download and install the latest version of Tableau Public to your laptop.
       
      Notes: 

       

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Thursday, March 14, 2019 - 10:00am to 4:00pm Burnaby, SFU's Big Data Hub (Applied Science Building - Flexible Meeting Room ASB 10908)

      Scholarly communication

      Next semester's workshops will be posted soon.

      Writing

      Graduate Open Writing Lab: Write Time, Write Space (drop-in)

      The Graduate Open Writing Lab is for all graduate students who want the time and a quiet, dedicated space to work on their writing. A Graduate Writing Facilitator will be available for consultations and to answer questions.

      Registration not required - please drop in!

      Spring Semester 2019 [January 7 to April 5]

      Burnaby Campus
      Graduate Open Writing Lab  - Mondays, 2:00 pm to 4:30 pm, SFU Burnaby, W.A.C. Bennett Library, Research Commons, Rm 7010
      (no session February 18)

      Vancouver Campus
      Graduate Open Writing Lab - Fridays, 11:30 am to 2:30 pm, SFU Vancouver, Harbour Centre - Room HC 7400*
      *January 11, it will take place in Room HC 1315, from 1:30pm to 4:30pm as part of New Year's Resolution Writing Spectacular

      Writing Workshops

      Please register for the following writing workshops:

      Write Conversations: Managing Writing Anxiety

      Being anxious about academic writing can lead to unhelpful writing habits like avoidance and procrastination. Join us for a discussion on how to make more progress by alleviating writing anxiety!

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Monday, February 25, 2019 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

      Write Conversations: What is a Literature Review?

      Believe it or not, it’s not just a long summary of relevant literature. Your literature review serves many purposes including improving your research, focusing your thesis or project, and perhaps most importantly, aptly demonstrating your new-found expertise to your reader while providing a strong first impression for your final written product.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Monday, March 4, 2019 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

      Write Conversations: "You're reader is a little bit drunk": Writing Clearly for an Audience of Sleep-Deprived Academics

      Today’s informal workshop borrows its name from a 2018 University Affairs article with the same title, written by Letitia Henville. Writing for an audience of academics has unique benefits and challenges: these individuals are intelligent, willing to read, and might even have high interest in your topic, but they are also indescribably busy, likely sleep-deprived, and are juggling a multitude of priorities. Join us today for some tips on how to get your message across to readers whose demanding schedules might leave them feeling a bit intoxicated by the time they open your file!

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Monday, March 11, 2019 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

      Write Conversations: Writing More Concisely

      Get to the point. Say more in fewer words. Bring your own strategies for writing concisely and learn some new ones, too. As Dante reminds us: “Let thy words be counted.”

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Monday, March 18, 2019 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

      Thesis reBoot

      Thesis reBoot is a day-long thesis writing retreat designed for graduate students who have already participated in Thesis Boot Camp.  

      Along with a comfortable, quiet working environment, writing and research support, and snacks and lunches, this day-long writing retreat offers students community and motivation in that final push towards the completion of their dissertation or thesis.

      More information can be found on the Thesis reBoot page.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Thursday, March 21, 2019 - 8:30am to 5:00pm Surrey, Galleria 5, Rm 5080

      Write Conversations: Transition Words and How to Use Them

      Are you getting feedback that your writing is “choppy”? Are you overusing certain transitional words and phrases like “however” or “on the other hand”? Join today’s discussion on how to use transitions thoughtfully so that your reader can comprehend your writing with ease and clarity.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Monday, March 25, 2019 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

      Write Conversations: The Home Stretch: Revising and Proofreading

      Knowing when to revise, what to look for, and when it's time to proofread will help you edit your own writing more effectively.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Friday, March 29, 2019 - 10:30am to 11:30am Vancouver, Harbour Centre, Rm 7400

      Write Conversations: Don't Plagiarize: Understanding how to Paraphrase

      Learning how to accurately and skillfully use our own words to describe other scholar’s ideas remains a challenging process for many graduate students, and understandably so. While practicing and improving paraphrasing is guaranteed to level-up your writing, doing so without plagiarizing can and should be an ongoing concern. Come to this discussion to learn more about that foreboding beast "plagiarism," and its lesser known version "patch writing," so that you are better able to both spot it in students' writing and avoid it in your own.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Monday, April 1, 2019 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

      Thesis

      Hands-On with the Library’s Thesis Word Template: Open Lab

      Bring your laptop (either PC or Mac), your document(s), and your questions to this open lab session to get some hands-on, practical help and suggestions with the Library’s thesis template. Join the Library’s support staff anytime during the open lab to learn how to:

      • populate the Table of Contents so that chapter headings and subheadings automatically show up with the correct pagination
      • insert table or figure/image captions so that they are auto-numbered and automatically populated into the List of Tables & List of Figures sections of your document
      • fine-tune the formatting of your tables
      • create very large tables to fit onto a landscape or tabloid (11x17) page
      • apply appropriate styles to make your thesis look consistent, professional and acceptable for Library submission and publication
      • other formatting tips & tricks

      Please register so that we know you’re coming.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Thursday, February 21, 2019 - 10:00am to 12:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

      Thesis reBoot

      Thesis reBoot is a day-long thesis writing retreat designed for graduate students who have already participated in Thesis Boot Camp.  

      Along with a comfortable, quiet working environment, writing and research support, and snacks and lunches, this day-long writing retreat offers students community and motivation in that final push towards the completion of their dissertation or thesis.

      More information can be found on the Thesis reBoot page.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Thursday, March 21, 2019 - 8:30am to 5:00pm Surrey, Galleria 5, Rm 5080

      Thesis template and resources: How to use it and where to find help

      This demonstration introduces you to the Thesis Assistance wepageThesis Submission process and the Thesis Template. This workshop will be broken down into four parts:

      1. It will begin with an introduction to required copyright permissions from the Copyright Office at SFU. (about 30 minutes)
      2. SFU Library's research data specialists will give instruction on how to preserve and, if appropriate, share research data for future uses. (about 15 minutes)
      3. The Theses Office will provide an overview of the Thesis Assistant website and go over the overall submission process (including deadlines and supporting documentation). (about 30 to 40 minutes)
      4. The technical part of the workshop will follow, where you will be walked through the overall structure of your thesis and the functionality of the thesis template. (about 30 to 40 minutes)

      Students are encouraged to bring their own computer and thesis document(s) to work along with the facilitator during the workshop.

      Learn how to:

      • request copyright permissions (if your thesis includes reproductions of copyright protected images, including  figures, drawings, paintings, photographs, logos, maps, diagrams, tables or charts, and even screen captures on the web, then you might need to request copyright permission)
      • write in the MS Word template-based file
      • format your text using styles
      • bring text in from other documents
      • insert figures, images, and auto-numbered captions
      • generate the Table of Contents, List of Tables, List of Figures, etc.

      If you’ve begun writing, send your document to theses@sfu.ca in advance of the workshop; one might be used in demonstrating the Library’s thesis template. After the session, the formatted document will be returned in which the student can continue his/her work.

      Upcoming Workshops

      Dates Location
      Thursday, March 7, 2019 - 10:30am to 12:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons
      Wednesday, April 3, 2019 - 1:30pm to 3:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons