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Events and workshops: Digital Humanities Innovation Lab (DHIL)

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Digital Humanities Skills Workshop Series

The DH Skills workshop series is a partnership between the Digital Humanities Innovation Lab (DHIL) and SFU Library’s Research Commons and is affiliated with the University of Victoria (ETCLDHSI, and UVic Libraries) and the University of British Columbia (UBC Library and UBC Advanced Research Computing). 

The workshops are free and open to to all, but registration is required.  Links to register are included under each workshop description.  Space is limited, so make sure to register soon to ensure a space. 

Beyond the Cloud: Using Voyant Tools to Analyze Texts

Digital tools for text analysis can help humanities researchers see and query their data in new ways through word frequency, patterns, and context. However, while a word cloud might seem to offer straightforward information about textual data, researchers may wonder how, why, and when to best to utilize these tools. This workshop will offer an introduction to Voyant - free, online software that creates visualizations of text - and to digital text analysis more broadly. We will discuss the different kinds of textual data that are optimal for digital text analysis, and explore several of Voyant’s functions that may be of interest to humanities scholars.

Note: Please bring your own laptop.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Thursday, November 7, 2019 - 1:00pm to 3:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

Introduction to Twitter bots with Tracery

Using the Tracery story-grammar generation tool, participants will learn how to turn simple JSON lists into full-fledged Twitter bots like @Gastwon, (https://twitter.com/gastwon) @TaySEliot (https://twitter.com/tayseliot) or even @SoftLandscapes. (https://twitter.com/softlandscapes). No programming experience is necessary.

Please bring a fully charged laptop.

 

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Thursday, November 14, 2019 - 1:00pm to 3:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

Introduction to Spatial Data in Humanities: Creating Story Maps

Many humanities researchers have some form of geographical information included in their research, such as objects, images, or texts from or about a particular place; narratives about a person’s movement or a place’s change over time; or information about networks of people or organizations. Whether places and spaces are at the heart of your research or are a part of it, mapping can help answer research questions and generate new ones by visualizing your data in new ways. It can help tell a story about place or space. This two-part workshop series will help humanities researchers map their place-based research with ArcGIS.

The Spatial Elements of Textual Analysis
The first workshop will cover the nuts and bolts of getting started mapping with ArcGIS. We will discuss how to extract data from your research, get it ready for analysis, and upload it into ArcGIS. The workshop will help humanities researchers explore and map the spatial elements of their research with ArcGIS.

Software: ArcGIS Online (participants will not need their own computer)

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • extract data from their research;
  • get their data ready for spatial analysis;
  • upload data into ArcGIS Online;
  • use some basic mapping techniques with ArcGIS Online.

Creating Story Maps
The second workshop will cover spatial analysis - the potential applications of your geographic information. We will demonstrate the analytic functions included in ArcGIS and discuss how to create context for your spatial data. We will also introduce Story Maps, an app that helps turn place-based information into narratives with a combination of maps, images, and text. Note: for this workshop, we will assume that you have already attended the first workshop or are comfortable with the material covered there.

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • create a Story Map;
  • extract spatial context from text.

Software: ArcGIS Online (participants will not need their own computer)

Workshop page (SFU Canvas): GIS workshops page includes workshop descriptions and suggested streams for different disciplines, handouts, slides, and example datasets

    Upcoming Workshops

    Dates Location
    Thursday, November 21, 2019 - 1:00pm to 3:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Lab 2105

    Introduction to Content Management Systems: Creating Exhibits with Omeka

    Content Management Systems (CMS) allow users to create powerful websites with user-friendly interfaces. Omeka is a “free, flexible, and open source web-publishing platform for the display of library, museum, archives, and scholarly collections and exhibitions". Any person interested in creating online exhibits and managing digital objects will benefit from this course. Attendees are encouraged to bring digital items or texts that are meaningful to them. Attendees will learn how to digitize files and objects and create rich exhibitions using the Omeka platform.
     
    Note: Please bring a laptop.
     
     

    Upcoming Workshops

    Dates Location
    Thursday, November 28, 2019 - 1:00pm to 3:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons

    Digital Humanities Discussion Series @Us

    You have a great set of research objects that you want to share publicly - but should you? You think it’s important to help your students share their work and engage in public conversations - but when should they be cautious? You want to share your research and your teaching practices on social media - but what about trolls?

    While digital tools are helping researchers and teachers to share their work in unprecedented ways, they also raise questions about how to use them in ways that are ethical, productive, and safe.

    @Us is a series of discussions that will take up these questions and more, offering participants a chance to think through issues, ask their own questions, share ideas and experiences, and get practical advice. We will suggest some optional readings to give participants some background for each topic. We will hold our discussion group at the Burnaby campus, on the first Thursday of every month, 1:30-2:30pm, through the Summer 2018 term; we are hoping to continue this discussion group beyond the term to create a space for ongoing conversations about critical DH for our community. Coffee and light refreshments served.

    Digital Humanities Café 

    The DH Café presents a series of short workshops and informal discussion on topics relevant to the basic theories and methods behind digital research in the humanities. The courses cover a broad range of topics, from larger issues in digital research in the academy to specific tools and research techniques.  The theme for Spring 2018 is How Do You Put the Digital in a Humanities Project?.  

    The workshops are free and open to to all, but registration is required.  Links to register are included under each workshop description.  Space is limited, so make sure to register soon to ensure a space.

    The DH Café is a partnership between the Digital Humanities Innovation Lab (DHIL) and SFU Library's Research Commons and is affiliated with KEY, SFU's Big Data Initiative

    Past workshops