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Events and workshops: Digital Humanities Innovation Lab (DHIL)

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Digital Humanities Skills Workshop Series

The DH Skills workshop series is a partnership between the Digital Humanities Innovation Lab (DHIL) and SFU Library’s Research Commons and is affiliated with the University of Victoria (ETCLDHSI, and UVic Libraries) and the University of British Columbia (UBC Library and UBC Advanced Research Computing). 

The workshops are free and open to to all, but registration is required.  Links to register are included under each workshop description.  Space is limited, so make sure to register soon to ensure a space. 

Building better "Galleries, Libraries, Archives and Museum Labs"

Speaker: Mahendra Mahey, British Library Labs Manager

Description:

The British Library is one of the largest national libraries in the world and is creating and storing millions of digital items every year such as digitised books, newspapers, maps, sheet music, manuscripts, audio / TV recordings as well as born digital archived websites, personal digital archives, electronic books, radio, performances, and artworks. This incredible range of digital material is having a profound effect on the way our libraries are supporting those who want to use digital content and methods in their work. What new facts will scholars discover when they analyse thousands of digitised books computationally using data-mining techniques? What are the challenges and solutions for libraries to build systems and services that provide seamless access to its digital material from a radio recording to newspaper story? What are the practical experiences of working on digital crowdsourcing projects, and how is machine learning helping libraries to unlock new information hidden in its digital archives? Can we use digital technologies to visualise and shine light on a library’s holdings, and unearth unusual and surprising findings artistically?
 
Mahendra will give a brief overview of digital collections and data being made available through British Library Labs (BL Labs) and examine how some of them have been re-used by making connections and collaborating with digital researchers, artists, entrepreneurs, educators, curators and librarians around the world through a range of innovative projects, research questions and engagement activities. He will highlight the myths and assumptions many make about libraries and address the significant issues and challenges they face when working with digital collections and data (e.g. legal, technical, human etc.). He will reflect on lessons he has learned over nearly two decades of working in Further and Higher Education, suggesting the types of digital research that could bring significant benefit and impact to the way libraries in particular may work into the future.
 
To conclude, Mahendra will report back on an exciting international support network that he is starting to build with colleagues around the world. This community is bringing national, state, university and public Galleries, Libraries, Archives and Museums together that either had, are planning or already have experimental digital "GLAM Labs" which encourage their users to re-use their digital collections and data. The group are already providing support to each other, sharing expertise, knowledge and experience and are pooling resources together in order to build better innovative digital "GLAM Labs" that bring value to their organisations and users well into the future. They also intend to publish a practical open access book in 2019 about "Building better GLAM Labs" which will include a description of the landscape of digital "GLAM Labs" worldwide and provide advice and guidance for libraries who are in process of setting up or currently running digital "GLAM Labs".

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Monday, February 25, 2019 - 10:30am to 12:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Rm 7200

British Library Labs Workshop: A hands-on data exploration & challenge

Speaker: Mahendra Mahey, British Library Labs Manager

Description:

  • you want to understand some of the challenges of working with cultural heritage data in a large national library such as the British Library?
  • Do you want to explore and get some 'hands-on' experience of working with the British Library’s digital collections and data?
  • Do you want to leave a ‘legacy’ of being a data-set author/creator/curator on the British Library’s data-set platform?
  • Do you have some digital literacy in using familiar data exploration tools such as Microsoft Excel (see 'GUIDANCE FOR THIS WORKSHOP' below)?
If the answer is 'Yes' to any of these, then this workshop could be for you!
 
Mahendra Mahey, manager of British Library Labs (BL Labs) will examine some of the BL’s digital collections/data & discuss challenges he has had in making the BL's cultural heritage data available openly or onsite at the British Library.
 
Mahendra will invite you to explore data-sets at your leisure, setting a challenge for those of you are interested, skilled in exploring, finding patterns and grouping data. They could become data-set authors/creators of derived data-sets, based on pre-existing digital collections/data provided on the day or already available on the British Library website.
 
The workshop will conclude with reflections from you and possibly highlighting a number derived data-sets that were generated by participants on the day that could now potentially exist on the British Library website. If selected, these new derived data-sets will be attributed with the creators' / authors' details and each will have its own cite-able Digital Object Identifier (D.O.I). These new data-sets would then be available for reuse by any researcher in the world.
 
GUIDANCE FOR THIS WORKSHOP
We strongly recommend you come to this workshop with an appropriate device such as a laptop pre-installed with appropriate tools to analyse different kinds of data-sets, e.g. Microsoft Excel may work with smaller data-sets such as metadata (see other data exploration tools below). If you don't have one, and would still like to attend, please request to 'pair up' with someone who is willing to share and has already signed up.
 
Other data exploration tools include: Notepad++ (e.g. for viewing text and XML); Open Refine (e.g. for cleaning data); Tableau Public (e.g. for visualising data); Google Fusion Tables (e.g for visualising geo-spatial data); Spacy (e.g. for text and data mining), RStudio (an open source Statistical package), MATLAB (data analysis tool) & NLTK (Natural Language processing). 
 
Please note that this workshop is NOT about training you in using any of these tools, just tools you may be already familiar with to explore and find patterns in our data.
 
Datatypes you may be examining in this workshop could include: .ZIP, .PDF, .TXT, .CSV, .TSV. .XLS, .XLSX, RDF, .nt, XML (TEI, ALTO and bespoke), .JSON, .JPG, .JPEG, .TIFF and .WARC
 
Please ensure you are able to read these files on your device before the workshop if you are interested in exploring them during our session.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Monday, February 25, 2019 - 1:30pm to 4:30pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Wosk Seminar Room 7100 (inside Special Collections)

Introduction to Spatial Data in Humanities: The Spatial Elements of Textual Analysis

Many humanities researchers have some form of geographical information included in their research, such as objects, images, or texts from or about a particular place; narratives about a person’s movement or a place’s change over time; or information about networks of people or organizations. Whether places and spaces are at the heart of your research or are a part of it, mapping can help answer research questions and generate new ones by visualizing your data in new ways. It can help tell a story about place or space. This two-part workshop series will help humanities researchers map their place-based research with ArcGIS.

The Spatial Elements of Textual Analysis
The first workshop will cover the nuts and bolts of getting started mapping with ArcGIS. We will discuss how to extract data from your research, get it ready for analysis, and upload it into ArcGIS. The workshop will help humanities researchers explore and map the spatial elements of their research with ArcGIS.

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • extract data from their research;
  • get their data ready for spatial analysis;
  • upload data into ArcGIS Online;
  • use some basic mapping techniques with ArcGIS Online.

Software: ArcGIS Online (participants will not need their own computer)

Workshop page (SFU Canvas): GIS workshops page includes workshop descriptions and suggested streams for different disciplines, handouts, slides, and example datasets

Creating Story Maps
The second workshop will cover spatial analysis - the potential applications of your geographic information. We will demonstrate the analytic functions included in ArcGIS and discuss how to create context for your spatial data. We will also introduce Story Maps, an app that helps turn place-based information into narratives with a combination of maps, images, and text. Note: for this workshop, we will assume that you have already attended the first workshop or are comfortable with the material covered there.

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • create a Story Map;
  • extract spatial context from text.

Upcoming Workshops

Dates Location
Monday, March 4, 2019 - 1:00pm to 3:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Lab 2105

Introduction to Spatial Data in Humanities: Creating Story Maps

Many humanities researchers have some form of geographical information included in their research, such as objects, images, or texts from or about a particular place; narratives about a person’s movement or a place’s change over time; or information about networks of people or organizations. Whether places and spaces are at the heart of your research or are a part of it, mapping can help answer research questions and generate new ones by visualizing your data in new ways. It can help tell a story about place or space. This two-part workshop series will help humanities researchers map their place-based research with ArcGIS.

The Spatial Elements of Textual Analysis
The first workshop will cover the nuts and bolts of getting started mapping with ArcGIS. We will discuss how to extract data from your research, get it ready for analysis, and upload it into ArcGIS. The workshop will help humanities researchers explore and map the spatial elements of their research with ArcGIS.

Software: ArcGIS Online (participants will not need their own computer)

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • extract data from their research;
  • get their data ready for spatial analysis;
  • upload data into ArcGIS Online;
  • use some basic mapping techniques with ArcGIS Online.

Creating Story Maps
The second workshop will cover spatial analysis - the potential applications of your geographic information. We will demonstrate the analytic functions included in ArcGIS and discuss how to create context for your spatial data. We will also introduce Story Maps, an app that helps turn place-based information into narratives with a combination of maps, images, and text. Note: for this workshop, we will assume that you have already attended the first workshop or are comfortable with the material covered there.

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • create a Story Map;
  • extract spatial context from text.

Software: ArcGIS Online (participants will not need their own computer)

Workshop page (SFU Canvas): GIS workshops page includes workshop descriptions and suggested streams for different disciplines, handouts, slides, and example datasets

    Upcoming Workshops

    Dates Location
    Tuesday, March 5, 2019 - 1:00pm to 3:00pm Burnaby, Bennett Library, Lab 2105

    Digital Humanities Discussion Series @Us

    You have a great set of research objects that you want to share publicly - but should you? You think it’s important to help your students share their work and engage in public conversations - but when should they be cautious? You want to share your research and your teaching practices on social media - but what about trolls?

    While digital tools are helping researchers and teachers to share their work in unprecedented ways, they also raise questions about how to use them in ways that are ethical, productive, and safe.

    @Us is a series of discussions that will take up these questions and more, offering participants a chance to think through issues, ask their own questions, share ideas and experiences, and get practical advice. We will suggest some optional readings to give participants some background for each topic. We will hold our discussion group at the Burnaby campus, on the first Thursday of every month, 1:30-2:30pm, through the Summer 2018 term; we are hoping to continue this discussion group beyond the term to create a space for ongoing conversations about critical DH for our community. Coffee and light refreshments served.

    Digital Humanities Café 

    The DH Café presents a series of short workshops and informal discussion on topics relevant to the basic theories and methods behind digital research in the humanities. The courses cover a broad range of topics, from larger issues in digital research in the academy to specific tools and research techniques.  The theme for Spring 2018 is How Do You Put the Digital in a Humanities Project?.  

    The workshops are free and open to to all, but registration is required.  Links to register are included under each workshop description.  Space is limited, so make sure to register soon to ensure a space.

    The DH Café is a partnership between the Digital Humanities Innovation Lab (DHIL) and SFU Library's Research Commons and is affiliated with KEY, SFU's Big Data Initiative

    Past workshops