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Events and workshops: Digital Humanities Innovation Lab (DHIL)

Digital Humanities Skills Workshop Series

The DH Skills workshop series is a partnership between the Digital Humanities Innovation Lab (DHIL) and SFU Library’s Research Commons and is affiliated with the University of Victoria (ETCLDHSI, and UVic Libraries) and the University of British Columbia (UBC Library and UBC Advanced Research Computing). 

The workshops are free and open to to all, but registration is required.  Links to register are included under each workshop description.  Space is limited, so make sure to register soon to ensure a space. 

Introduction to the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI): What is it and why should I care? [Online]

The Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) is the de facto standard for digitizing and enriching textual materials. An XML encoding language, the TEI offers a robust, multi-lingual vocabulary for describing, analyzing, preserving, and publishing “texts” across various genres: poems, drama, manuscripts, tombstones, posters, audio recordings, music videos, et cetera.

This workshop will serve as an introduction to the TEI as an encoding language, outlining how individuals can use the TEI in their own research projects. No prior experience with markup language, text encoding, or the digital humanities is needed. By the end of this workshop, participants will understand why it is that so many digital humanities resources—including Early English Books Online (EEBO), Eighteenth Century Collections Online, and the Women Writers Project—use TEI to enrich their digital archives and what the scholarly and technical affordances are of using the TEI. This workshop will also provide participants tangible tools for taking up the TEI for their own purposes and outline how participants leverage the mechanisms of the TEI within their own work.

Technical requirements: Computer with access to the internet via an up-to-date browser.

Register for upcoming workshops

Dates Location
Tuesday, July 7, 2020 - 1:00pm to 2:30pm via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

Using Palladio for Social Network Analysis [Online]

Palladio, developed by Stanford’s Humanities + Design Lab, is a web-based visualization tool for complex humanities data. A super easy-to-use tool, it can be particularly good for beginners to social network analysis.  This workshop will contextualize the exploration of Palladio within an intellectual inquiry–what drove the inquiry and what emerged from the data as a result of deep engagement of the visualization.  Specifically, the workshop will cover: 

  1. Introduction to Palladio 
  2. Example: using the Chinese Head Tax data to visualize historical migration patterns 
  3. The caveats behind Palladio's ease of use 

*It's not necessary to have knowledge about social network analysis. 

Technical requirements: Computer with access to the internet via an up-to-date browser.

Register for upcoming workshops

Dates Location
Friday, July 17, 2020 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

Introduction to Spatial Data in Humanities: The Spatial Elements of Textual Analysis [Online]

Many humanities researchers have some form of geographical information included in their research, such as objects, images, or texts from or about a particular place; narratives about a person’s movement or a place’s change over time; or information about networks of people or organizations. Whether places and spaces are at the heart of your research or are a part of it, mapping can help answer research questions and generate new ones by visualizing your data in new ways. It can help tell a story about place or space. This two-part workshop series will help humanities researchers map their place-based research with ArcGIS.

The Spatial Elements of Textual Analysis
The first workshop will cover the nuts and bolts of getting started mapping with ArcGIS. We will discuss how to extract data from your research, get it ready for analysis, and upload it into ArcGIS. The workshop will help humanities researchers explore and map the spatial elements of their research with ArcGIS.

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • extract data from their research;
  • get their data ready for spatial analysis;
  • upload data into ArcGIS Online;
  • use some basic mapping techniques with ArcGIS Online.

Creating Story Maps
The second workshop will cover spatial analysis - the potential applications of your geographic information. We will demonstrate the analytic functions included in ArcGIS and discuss how to create context for your spatial data. We will also introduce Story Maps, an app that helps turn place-based information into narratives with a combination of maps, images, and text. Note: for this workshop, we will assume that you have already attended the first workshop or are comfortable with the material covered there.

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • create a Story Map;
  • extract spatial context from text.

--------------------------

For both workshops:

Software: ArcGIS Online. You do not need to install any software. However, if you wish to participate during the hands-on portion, please send an email to gis-software@sfu.ca to request an ArcGIS online account.

Workshop page (SFU Canvas): GIS workshops page includes workshop descriptions and suggested streams for different disciplines, handouts, slides, and example datasets.

Register for upcoming workshops

Dates Location
Tuesday, July 21, 2020 - 10:00am to 12:00pm via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

Introduction to Spatial Data in Humanities: Creating Story Maps [Online]

Many humanities researchers have some form of geographical information included in their research, such as objects, images, or texts from or about a particular place; narratives about a person’s movement or a place’s change over time; or information about networks of people or organizations. Whether places and spaces are at the heart of your research or are a part of it, mapping can help answer research questions and generate new ones by visualizing your data in new ways. It can help tell a story about place or space. This two-part workshop series will help humanities researchers map their place-based research with ArcGIS.

The Spatial Elements of Textual Analysis
The first workshop will cover the nuts and bolts of getting started mapping with ArcGIS. We will discuss how to extract data from your research, get it ready for analysis, and upload it into ArcGIS. The workshop will help humanities researchers explore and map the spatial elements of their research with ArcGIS.

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • extract data from their research;
  • get their data ready for spatial analysis;
  • upload data into ArcGIS Online;
  • use some basic mapping techniques with ArcGIS Online.

Creating Story Maps
The second workshop will cover spatial analysis - the potential applications of your geographic information. We will demonstrate the analytic functions included in ArcGIS and discuss how to create context for your spatial data. We will also introduce Story Maps, an app that helps turn place-based information into narratives with a combination of maps, images, and text. Note: for this workshop, we will assume that you have already attended the first workshop or are comfortable with the material covered there.

By the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • create a Story Map;
  • extract spatial context from text.

--------------------------

For both workshops:

Software: ArcGIS Online. You do not need to install any software. However, if you wish to participate during the hands-on portion, please send an email to gis-software@sfu.ca to request an ArcGIS online account.

Workshop page (SFU Canvas): GIS workshops page includes workshop descriptions and suggested streams for different disciplines, handouts, slides, and example datasets

    Register for upcoming workshops

    Dates Location
    Tuesday, July 28, 2020 - 10:00am to 12:00pm via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

    R for Literature Scholars [Online]

    Computational analysis, also known as distant reading, provides access to information or insights about a text that would be nearly impossible to gather using methods of close reading and “manual” synthesis. This workshop is based on Matthew Jockers’ book “Text Analysis with R for Students of Literature”. We will provide an introduction to computational text analysis using the programming language R and look at 1-2 analysis techniques based on word frequency. 

    This workshop is for beginners.

    Software/Technical Requirements:

    Register for upcoming workshops

    Dates Location
    Thursday, August 6, 2020 - 9:00am to 12:00pm via Zoom (link will be sent to participants 24 hours before the workshop/event begins)

    Past workshops