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Citing websites: APA (6th ed.) citation guide

 

This guide is based on the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th ed. It provides selected citation examples for common types of sources. For more detailed information please consult a print copy of the style manual.

For the best printing results for this guide, use the printer-friendly PDF format.

Entire site, not a single document or web page

Reference in text example:

The website for Simon Fraser University in British Columbia, Canada can be found at http://www.sfu.ca.

Reference list example:

Not applicable

Comments:

  • Citation information for citing a website in its entirety (not a document or page found on that website) is from the APA style blog.
  • If you are citing the entire website cite the URL in the text - putting a reference in the Reference List is unnecessary. 
  • If you are quoting or paraphrasing information from a website you should cite that material using the format found in the next section - "Website - Quoting or Paraphrasing Part of a Website."
  • If you are citing a document or report found online, use the format found in "Website - A Document or Report Found Online."

Quoting or paraphrasing part of a website (6.05, 6.29, 6.31-6.32 & 7.11, pp. 171-172, 185-192, 214-215)

 

General reference form for websites (from the APA Style Blog) :
Author, A. (date). Title of document. Retrieved from http://URL

 

General reference form for websites including a format description (i.e. a blog post, lecture notes, or CD) :
Author, A. (date). Title of document [Format description]. Retrieved from http://URL

 

Reference in text example:

(American Red Cross, 2004)
(American Red Cross, 2004, "Home fire campaign  underway") [when quoting]

(Property and Environment Research Center [PERC], 2007) [first use]
(PERC, 2007) [subsequent use]
(PERC, 2007, para. 4) [subsequent use - when quoting]

(Jess, 2009)
(Jess, 2009, para. 5) [when quoting]

Reference list example:

American Red Cross. (2004). A home fire escape plan can save your life. Retrieved from http://www.redcross.org/news/article/A-Home-Fire-Escape-Plan-Can-Save-Your-Life

Jess. (2009, April 18). Some things I have learned about teens [Blog post]. Retrieved from http://coollibrarianblog.blogspot.com/2009/04/some-things-i-have-learned-about-teens.html

Property and Environment Research Center. (2007, Winter). Less is more when it comes to packaging. Retrieved from http://perc.org/articles/less-more-when-it-comes-packaging

Comments:

  • Other non-routine information examples: [Letter to the editor], [Special issue], [Special section], [Monograph], [Abstract], [Audio podcast], [Data file], [Brochure], [Motion picture], [CD], [Computer software], [Video webcast], and [Supplemental material].
  • When citing a web site in the Reference List, provide as much as possible of the following information:
    • Author's name (if available).
    • Date of publication or update in parentheses (if available). If there is no date, use '(n.d.)' instead.
    • Title or description of document.
    • Title of complete work (if relevant), in italics or underlined.
    • URL.
  • If there is no author the title of the webpage is used in its place.
  • When making in-text citations, use paragraph numbers (abbreviated to “para.”) if page numbers are not available. If there are no paragraph numbers, use the heading. The heading may be shortened if necessary.
  • Do not include retrieval dates unless the source material is likely to change over time (e.g. blogs, wikis).
  • There is no period after the URL.
  • Do not insert a hyphen when breaking a long URL.
  • For blogs, include the name of the blog to which the entry was posted, if this information is not part of the URL. If the author’s full name is unavailable, use the screen name.
  • Do not include retrieval dates unless the source material is likely to change over time (e.g. blogs, wikis).

A Document or report found online (6.31-6.32 & 7.03, pp. 187-192, 205-206)

 

General reference form:
Author, A. A., & Author, B. B. (Date of publication). Title of document. Retrieved from http://URL

 

Reference in text example:

(National Institute of Mental Health [NIMH], 2014) [first use]
(NIMH, 2014) [subsequent use]
(NIMH, 2014, "Binge-eating disorder") [when quoting]

(Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change [IPCC], 2014) [first use]
(IPCC, 2014) [subsequent use]
(IPCC, 2014, p. 19) [subsequent use - when quoting]

Reference list example:

Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. (2014). Summary for policymakers. In Field, C.B., V.R. Barros. D.J. Dokken, K.J. Mach, M.D. Mastrandrea, T.E. Bilir, M. Chatterjee, K.L. Ebi, Y.O. Estrada, R.C. Genova, B. Girma, E.S. Kissel, A.N. Levy, S. MacCracken, P.R. Mastrandrea, and L.L. White (Eds.), Climate Change 2014: Impacts, Adaptation, and Vulnerability. Part A: Global and Sectoral Aspects. Contribution of Working Group II to the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. (pp. 1-32). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Retrieved from http://ipcc-wg2.gov/AR5/images/uploads/WG2AR5_SPM_FINAL.pdf

National Institute of Mental Health. (2014). Eating disorders: About more than food. Retrieved from http://www.nimh.nih.gov.health/publications/eating-disorders-new-trifold/eating disorders-pdf_148810.pdf

Comments:

  • Try the root website if you can't find the information you're looking for on the page that you want to cite.
  • If there is no author, the title of the webpage is used in its place.
  • If you are missing one or more elements, this chart from the APA Style Blog will show you how to adapt your reference.
  • When making in-text citations, use paragraph numbers (abbreviated to "para.") if page numbers are not available. If there are no paragraph numbers, use the heading. The heading may be shortened if necessary.
  • There is no period after the URL.
  • Do not insert a hyphen when breaking a long URL.
  • Provide a URL that links directly to the chapter or section.
  • When an internet document is more than one web page, provide  a URL that links to the home page or entry page for the document.
  • If there is no date available for the document use (n.d.) for "no date."
If your report is from a Canadian government website, refer to SFU's customised APA citation guides for Canadian government documents.

No author, no date (6.27, 6.28, 6.15, pp. 184, 185, 176-177)

Reference in text example:

("Tautology," n.d.)

Reference list example:

Tautology. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/tautology

Comments:

When making in-text citations, use paragraph numbers (abbreviated to “para.”) if page numbers are not available. If there are no paragraph numbers, use the heading. The heading may be shortened if necessary.