SLC Blog: In Common. A stylized image of a diverse group of students in a lecture hall

The Student Learning Commons blog is your online writing and learning community

Happy Holidays from the SLC

Published by Julia Lane

Wishing you all safe and happy holidays. See you in the new decade (2020)!

Six word stories

Published by Julia Lane

Sharing more of the six word stories we have collected by asking members of the SLC community to reflect on their mistakes and/or what they've learned from them. Enjoy! Maybe you'll see yourself in some of these micro-stories! I know I do... :}

Essential components of argumentative writing

Published by Julia Lane

Have an argumentative or thesis-based essay coming up for one of your classes? Check out this blog post to help you develop a thorough and well-supported argument! 

Thank you to Teeba Obaid, PhD Candidate in the Faculty of Education, for contributing this post to the blog!

The Excellent Mistakes Toolkit

Published by Julia Lane

Looking for an icebreaker for your next event? Interested in promoting self-reflection opportunities? Curious about the relationship between mistakes or failure and resiliency?

This is the toolkit for you! 

[Note: Excellent mistakes not included!]

The common comma: Part 1

Published by Julia Lane

Perhaps you are starting to gear up for term paper writing? If so, you might be wondering when you are REALLY supposed to be using commas...

SLC Writing Coordinator Amanda Goldrick-Jones, PhD, returns to help us understand that common piece of punctuation, the comma... and maybe, just maybe, how to save our relationships? 

Welcome Guest Blogger Eric Cai!

Published by Julia Lane

In Common welcomes former SLC Peer Eric Cai as a guest blogger. In his posts, he will focus on study and communication skills for students in math and science. Learn more about Eric in the following email interview.

I'm from...

Published by Julia Lane

“Hi, how are you?”

“I'm doing well. How about you?”

“I'm good too. Are you from here? Where are you from?”

In this submission to the SLC Multilingual Story Hub, Sneha Ralli digs into this familiar exchange and wonders about the ways that asking where someone is from can serve to accentuate our differences and interrupt one's sense of cultural belonging.  

Sneha Ralli is a PhD student at SFU who was born in Delhi and raised in Mumbai, India. Sneha participated in Dr. Timothy Mossman's non-credit course Academic Grammar and Writing for Multilingual Learners during the Fall 2018 semester.