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World Literature information resources: Citing & writing

Style guides

  • MLA Style Library guide (8th ed., 2016)
  • MLA handbook for writers of research papers [print]

Citing translations

MLA, 8th ed.

Note that in the 8th ed., terms like 'translator' ('editor', 'illustrator', etc.) are no longer abbreviated, and that the place of publication and the type of source at the end of a citation (e.g. 'Print') are no longer required. Authors' names from languages that do not use the Latin alphabet should be romanized.

Gorky, Maksim. Childhood. Translated by Graham Hettlinger, Ivan R. Dee, 2010.

MLA (8th ed.), p. 23: "When you discuss a source that was translated from another language and your focus is on the translation, treat the translator as the author." E.g.:

Seidensticker, Edward G., translator. The Tale of Genji. By Murasaki Shikibu. Knopf, 1976.

Sullivan, Alan, and Timothy Murphy, translators. Beowulf. Edited by Sarah Anderson, Pearson, 2004.

Writing guides

Recommended books

  • How to write critical essays: a guide for students of literature [online]
  • Writing about literature: essay and translation skills for university students of English and foreign literature [online]
  • Writing at university: a guide for students [online]
  • Writing analytically [print]
  • Academic writing: an introduction [print]

Plagiarism

Plagiarism is the unacknowledged use of other people's ideas or work. It is a serious academic offence. Take the Understanding and Avoiding Plagiarism Tutorial to test your knowledge of plagiarism. For more information about what constitutes plagiarism and how to avoid it, see the Library guide.

Citation management tools

To learn how to generate your works-cited list and in-text citations automatically, see Citation Management Software.