Radical Access: The SFU Scholarly Publishing blog

Scholarly Publishing and Open Access blog

The latest news and answers to your questions about scholarly publishing and open access.

Monographs: a path to publishing your thesis or dissertation

Published by Ioana Liuta

This blog post was written by Eleonora Joensuu, PhD

As you approach the end of your graduate work, you may be starting to consider and wonder about the possibility of publishing your thesis or dissertation as a book. Each publisher has their own process, but I am here to share my experiences publishing my doctoral dissertation with a major academic publisher in the hopes that it offers some insight into what the process may be like.

How can I publish an academic article as an undergraduate student?

Published by Kate Shuttleworth
If you're an undergraduate student involved in research, or you've written some original work, you may be wondering about your options for getting an article published in an academic journal.
 
We've written about graduate student publishing before on Radical Access when we showcased recipients of the GSS Open Access award and answered the question,"Can I publish my thesis?." While publishing a

Should I be worried about my thesis or dissertation being openly available in Summit?

Published by Jennifer Zerkee

It can be daunting to think about your thesis or dissertation being openly available in Summit for anyone to find and read. You may have heard concerns about plagiarism, predatory publishers or limitations on your ability to publish a manuscript based on your openly available thesis. Be reassured that, for the most part, these concerns are unwarranted. Most universities in Canada make their students' theses and dissertations open.

Can I publish my thesis?

Published by Jennifer Zerkee

Your Masters or PhD thesis is the result of years spent in study of a specific topic. It's no surprise that many grads would like to turn their thesis into an article, a series of articles, a book chapter or a monograph.

Do you have the right to do this? What are SFU's rights to your thesis? Will publishers want a work that is based on a thesis, especially once the thesis is publicly available in Summit?