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Digital Humanities Innovation Lab blog

DHIL blog

News about the Digital Humanities Innovation Lab

Dreams, Narratives… Analysis

Published March 28, 2018 by Rebecca Dowson
Dream Language Word Cloud

Most people regard their nocturnal adventures a little higher than sheer gibberish, and they tend to quickly forget about them a few minutes after waking up. At Dr. Tore Nielsen’s Dream and Nightmare Laboratory in Montréal though, these are highly valued as items of a scientific inquiry into consciousness and cognition. Talk of text analysis, at first, might seem a bit out of place here; dreams are hallucinatory experiences that take place during sleep - they don’t seem to be the kind of things that give way to objective study.

INKE 2018 & Academics on Social Media

Published February 25, 2018 by Rebecca Dowson
INKE 2018 Beyond Open: Implementing Social Scholarship

What does it mean for scholars to work in the “open”? How do they connect with their communities, publish their work, and what issues should they be aware of? How can libraries support and foster the open exchange of knowledge? These and many other questions were addressed at Beyond Open: Implementing Social Scholarship, a gathering in Victoria, BC hosted by INKE (Implementing New Knowledge Networks).

Suspense: Towards a Digital Narratology

Published October 5, 2017 by Rebecca Dowson
Mark Algee-Hewitt on analyzing suspense with digital methods

In partnership with KEY, SFU’s Big Data Initiative, the Digital Humanities Innovation Lab was pleased to welcome Dr. Mark Algee-Hewitt on September 22, 2017. Mark is an Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities and English at Stanford University, and the Director of the Stanford Literary Lab. He spoke about his current project with the lab, which uses data analysis from works of fiction in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries to discover literary techniques that create the feeling of suspense.

Spotlight on Aldus@SFU

Published May 4, 2017 by Rebecca Dowson
Detail from Aldine Press book

I met with John Maxwell and Alessandra Bordini in John’s office on a typically grey spring day. Maxwell is the director of the Publishing Program at SFU and Bordini is the lead researcher for this project as well as self-described Aldus Manutius fan, among her many other qualifications. Tacked to his office door, Maxwell has small printout of the classical Latin adage, festina lente, which means “make haste slowly.” This adage is not only personified in the anchor and dolphin of Aldus Manutius’ printer’s mark but also occasionally in the nature of digital humanities projects. I sat down and talked with Maxwell and Bordini about Aldus and what it means to do DH.

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