SLC Blog: In Common. A stylized image of a diverse group of students in a lecture hall

The Student Learning Commons blog is your online writing and learning community

Getting feedback for your writing

image of glasses on top of notepad
Published by Hermine Chan

Asking for feedback for your writing sounds great. But how do you do it? How do you know what helps and what doesn't? 

The difference between Conversational and Academic English

Two people having conversation over coffee
Published by Hermine Chan

Words are just words. Or are they? Writing & Learning Peer Angelica Y. writes about the differences between conversational and academic English and gives us some tips for improving our everyday conversations.

Grammar Camp: Ending a sentence in a preposition

Published by Hermine Chan

Ending a sentence in a preposition is something up with which I will not put! Let’s talk about that infamous Latin grammar rule and scenarios where you won’t be able to not end a sentence in a preposition (yikes, a double-negative too)!  

In the time of Zoom: internationally-based students  

Published by Hermine Chan

The pandemic has changed the way we live and learn, and some internationally-based students are feeling more pressure than ever as they deal with time zone differences and expectations.  Some of our EAL peers share their experience working with, or themselves being, internationally based students. 

Happy Holidays from the SLC

Published by Julia Lane

Wishing you all safe and happy holidays. See you in the new decade (2020)!

Six word stories

Published by Julia Lane

Sharing more of the six word stories we have collected by asking members of the SLC community to reflect on their mistakes and/or what they've learned from them. Enjoy! Maybe you'll see yourself in some of these micro-stories! I know I do... :}

Essential components of argumentative writing

Published by Julia Lane

Have an argumentative or thesis-based essay coming up for one of your classes? Check out this blog post to help you develop a thorough and well-supported argument! 

Thank you to Teeba Obaid, PhD Candidate in the Faculty of Education, for contributing this post to the blog!