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Different ways of approaching the academic essay

Published by Hermine Chan

Many students don’t find the academic English essay structure natural — it can seem repetitive, direct, and rigid. It’s important to recognize that the English essay structure is just one mode of thinking!   

Writing a Professional Email: 101

Published by Julia Lane

Former SLC English as Additional Language Peer Bessie W. returns with tips and tricks for writing a professional email. Just in time to help you reach out to your professor or TA to get clarification on those first assignments... 

CJSF interview -- Inclusive Writing resources highlight

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Published by Julia Lane

On July 29th, Julia Lane (SLC Writing Services Associate) did an interview with Ciara Reid on CJSF. Check out the link in the post to listen to the interview and learn about the SLC's forthcoming Inclusive Writing resources. 

 
 

The parts of speech: The last 4

Published by Julia Lane

Welcome to second installment of our Grammar Camp series on the Parts of Speech. 

If you didn't catch it or want to review, check out last week's post, which covered nouns, pronouns, adjectives, and verbs.

This week's post covers adverbs, prepositions, conjunctions, and interjections

Thanks for Dr. Amanda Goldrick-Jones, SLC Writing Coordinator, for developing and sharing this content. 

The parts of speech: The first 4

Published by Julia Lane

In this Grammar Camp post, Dr. Amanda Goldrick-Jones, SLC Writing Coordinator, provides an overview of 4 basic parts of speech. There are 8 basic parts of speech, so stay tuned for next week's post about the last 4, and for two self-test quizzes for you to test out your newly acquired grammar know-how!

You can also jump to Part 2

Broken EAL student's monologue

Published by Julia Lane

By Daniel Chang 

PhD candidate and SLC Writing Consultant Daniel Chang writes about his experience being an EAL student for the past 10 years. In this post he questions the image of EAL students as "broken students" and reinforces the idea that language issues are experienced by everyone.