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Grammar Camp: Ending a sentence in a preposition

Published by Hermine Chan

Ending a sentence in a preposition is something up with which I will not put! Let’s talk about that infamous Latin grammar rule and scenarios where you won’t be able to not end a sentence in a preposition (yikes, a double-negative too)!  

In the time of Zoom: internationally-based students  

Published by Hermine Chan

The pandemic has changed the way we live and learn, and some internationally-based students are feeling more pressure than ever as they deal with time zone differences and expectations.  Some of our EAL peers share their experience working with, or themselves being, internationally based students. 

Happy Holidays from the SLC

Published by Julia Lane

Wishing you all safe and happy holidays. See you in the new decade (2020)!

Writing anxiety

Published by Julia Lane

Feeling anxious about writing your term papers this semester? You aren't alone! In fact, writing anxiety is experienced by writers across all genres and all stages of writing experience. This blog post explores the topic of writing anxiety and provides some practical suggestions for how to address the anxiety you may be experiencing. 

Note: this post focuses on "every day" writing anxiety and not clinical anxiety. If your anxiety is unmanageable, please get support from SFU Health and Counselling or from another health care professional. Your well-being matters! 

Reflective writing

Published by Julia Lane

This post explains the genre of reflective writing, which is often what you are expected to do if you have a (critical) journal or analytical response assignment in your class. 

This explanation of reflective writing starts from Gerald Graff and Cathy Birkenstein's (2012) statement that such assignments "require that you demonstrate that you have thought about what it is you think" (p. 222). Graff and Birkenstein are focused on writing in the social sciences, but the idea that you have to think about what you think is broadly applicable to any reflective writing task.