SLC Blog: In Common. A stylized image of a diverse group of students in a lecture hall

The Student Learning Commons blog is your online writing and learning community

Grammar Camp: Ending a sentence in a preposition

Published by Hermine Chan

Ending a sentence in a preposition is something up with which I will not put! Let’s talk about that infamous Latin grammar rule and scenarios where you won’t be able to not end a sentence in a preposition (yikes, a double-negative too)!  

Reflecting on English as Additional Language Peer Educator Training

Published by Julia Lane

Guest blogger and English as Additional Language Peer Educator, Ashley K. writes this week about her experiences with EAL Peer training. In particular, she reflects on a lecture presented by Dr. Ena Lee, Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Education. Dr. Lee's talk focused on the "commonsense discourses" of English language learning, and how these "commonsense" ideas are often actually wrong. 

Ashley connects this talk with her experiences doing a "Pluriligual Identity" exercise and reflecting on her own connections with language learning, identity, and culture. 

 

Writing anxiety

Published by Julia Lane

Feeling anxious about writing your term papers this semester? You aren't alone! In fact, writing anxiety is experienced by writers across all genres and all stages of writing experience. This blog post explores the topic of writing anxiety and provides some practical suggestions for how to address the anxiety you may be experiencing. 

Note: this post focuses on "every day" writing anxiety and not clinical anxiety. If your anxiety is unmanageable, please get support from SFU Health and Counselling or from another health care professional. Your well-being matters! 

Reflective writing

Published by Julia Lane

This post explains the genre of reflective writing, which is often what you are expected to do if you have a (critical) journal or analytical response assignment in your class. 

This explanation of reflective writing starts from Gerald Graff and Cathy Birkenstein's (2012) statement that such assignments "require that you demonstrate that you have thought about what it is you think" (p. 222). Graff and Birkenstein are focused on writing in the social sciences, but the idea that you have to think about what you think is broadly applicable to any reflective writing task. 

Grammar Camp: Myths & truths Part 2

Published by Julia Lane

By Dr. Amanda Goldrick-Jones, SLC Writing Services Coordinator 

In Part 2 of Myths and truths, Amanda offers a definition of grammar that you may not have considered before. She then goes on to dispel three grammar myths and offer one grammar truth. 

If you missed Part 1, read it now. 

Grammar Camp: Myths & truths Part 1

Published by Julia Lane

By Dr. Amanda Goldrick-Jones, SLC Writing Services Coordinator 

In Part 1 of Myths and truths, Amanda explains that there are probably fewer grammar "rules" than many of us assume. Then, she takes apart four common myths about grammar. 

If you want a challenge, try taking the quiz before reading these posts. See how well you can distinguish grammar rules from grammar myths. 

Read Part 2 of Myths and truths coming up in one week!