Search Instructions for Print Measurement Bureau

 

Print Measurement Bureau (PMB) Canada's leading syndicated study for single-source data on print readership, non-print media exposure, product usage and lifestyles. PMB is a tabulation program designed to process and analyse data from readership and product survey databases and is an excellent source of Canadian marketing information. It allows you to compare and contrast several variables across selected populations or media.

The first question to ask yourself is, "Do I need to search the PMB database?" The appropriate information might be in the Print Measurement Bureau Category Reports or PMB's Readership volume (Bennett and Belzberg Reference PN 4914 P4 P45 pt. 1). If you want to know how many people in Alberta read Canadian Gardener, for instance, it's in the Readership volume. If you want to know how many seniors wear Chanel perfume, it's in the Cosmetics/Women's Products section of the category reports. If, though, you want to compare the Chanel perfume wearing and Canadian Gardener reading habits of elderly Albertans, then it's time to search the PMB database.

Be forewarned: PMB a complex database to search, but has very useful data, and is quite flexible in how you present the data. With some patience and time spent practicing, you will be able to do detailed market research with this database.

Accessing the PMB database

PMB, produced by Nielsen Clear Decision and formerly by Interactive market Systems, can be found on the standalone computer at the Belzberg and Bennett Libraries.

To access PMB at the Belzberg and Bennett standalone computers click on:

Start --> Programs  --> Clear decisions (Formerly IMS Print)

This guide is an introduction to basic PMB crosstabulation searching. A Crosstabulation search compares and contrasts several variables across a selected population. A crosstab search could compare such variables as the entertaining habits of beer drinkers versus champagne drinkers in Vancouver, which will be our sample search. There is also Cost ranking and Reach & Frequency, which this guide won't be covering.

Crosstabulation

1. Select Bases

  • Click on  Crosstab icon

 

  • Drill down using the plus icon to the year of study you want and click on OK

There are two parts to the work screen: the left side is the Codebook or information side and the right side of the screen is the work area/build grid where the search will be built.

Click on Quickdemos under Shortcuts for a fast way to obtain population suggestions. Make the population base pretty general, such as women, or people over 65. You will be narrowing the search later in rows and columns.

To pick the base, click on Cities. Click on vancouver, drag over to "Drag items here to build grid" to drop in Add Base area when it appears. The title "vancouver" is suggested for the base population. You will now see the number of Vancouverites.

Note: You can combine terms in the Bases. For example, if you want the target population to be women in Vancouver, go into Quickdemos, click on gender, click on women and drag it over to the current Base (i.e. Vancouver) and hover. Select the choice vancouver AND women and then drop into And with existing Base. The title will change to vancouver and women.

2.  Select Rows

This step defines the vertical axis on the chart you are creating. We're selecting the variables beer drinkers and champagne drinkers.

Note: Rows and columns are the sets of information that are going to be compared. Whether you want variable A in column and B in row, or B in column and A in row really is a matter of taste. Any two pieces of information in the database can be compared, or crosstabulated.

In Codebook under Contents:

  • Click on Alcohol
  • Click on Beer
  • Drill down using the plus icon  to Personally Drank in Past 6 months.
  • Click on Yes, drag it over to Add Row in the work area and drop it in
  • Right click on the title Yes (which is not terribly descriptive), click on Edit title and change Yes to Beer drinkers

To get champagne drinkers the process is the same:

In Codebook under Contents:

  • Click on Alcohol
  • Click on Champagne \ Sparkling wine
  • Drill down using the plus icon to Personally Drank in Past 6 months.
  • Click on Yes, drag it over to Add Row in the work area and drop it in
  • Right click on the title Yes (which is not terribly descriptive), click on Edit title and change Yes to Champagne drinkers

You now have the number of beer and champagne drinkers.

3. Select Columns

This step defines the horizontal axis of the chart you are making. We are selecting people who entertain at home.

In Codebook under Contents:

  • Click on Leisure, Restaurants, Tobacco
  • Drill down using the plus icon  to Leisure Activities - Personally Participated and then Leisure Activities - Entertaining at Home.
  • Click and highlight 1 to 10+ times to get everyone who entertains, drag them over to Add Columns, hover over "Join items with OR into single column" and then drop them in. Right click on the long title, click on edit title, and change it to Entertains at home.

4. Reading the Report

 

You now have the numbers of:

  • Vancouverites, beer drinkers in Vancouver, champagne drinkers in Vancouver, and people who entertain at home in Vancouver;
  • beer drinkers in Vancouver who entertain at home, and finally, champagne drinkers in Vancouver who entertain at home.

You can look at the numbers in several, useful ways.

Weighted numbers: the weighted or (000) number represents the estimated number, in the thousands, of the population as a whole. (The unweighted number is the actual number of survey respondents.) Using this report as an example, it is estimated that 797,000 Vancouverites entertain at home.

Index: "a percentage that relates numbers to a base. Used to show what is above average (101 or greater), average (100), or below average (99 or less)." When an index is greater than 110 or less than 90 it is considered statistically significant.

How to read horizontal and vertical percentages:

                                Y
X                            xx
                  Vert  Z(%)
                 Horiz Q(%)
                            Xxx

It's easiest to figure out the percentages by reading aloud:
Vert %:      “Of Y, Z% are X”
Horiz %:     “Of X, Q% are Y”

To use this report as an example:

Vertical percentage: "Of people who entertain at home in Vancouver, 49.08% are beer drinkers."
Horizontal percentage: "Of the beer drinkers in Vancouver, 43.88% entertain at home."

To test yourself, work out the vertical and horizontal percentages for champagne drinkers. (Answers at bottom of this page.)

5. Printing the Report

To print, export, save or email the report, click on the Clear Decisions ball in the upper right hand corner of the screen, click on print and follow the instructions.

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Answers

Vertical percentage: "Of people who entertain at home in Vancouver, 20.33% drink champagne."
Horizontal percentage: "Of champagne drinkers in Vancouver, 60% entertain at home."